Tuesday, May 12, 2015

GARDNER SNOW 1793-1889

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow).]

Manti Cemetery photo taken August 10, 2004
Burial: Manti Cemetery, Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, USA - Plot: Lot 18 Block 13 Plot A Grv

 Colorized by tin type.








Militia headstone for Gardener Snow.













GARDNER SNOW
Gardner Snow was born 4 February, 1793, to James Snow and Abagail Farr, in Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire. He was the fourth child. He first married Sarah Sawyer Hastings, sometimes referred to as Sally. A daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Salome Burt, she was born on November 30, 1814 at Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She died 27 April, 1855 at Manti, Sanpete County, Utah.

In June 1833, three years after the Church was organized, Orson Pratt was doing missionary work in the Chesterfield area, and he baptized and confirmed Gardner Snow, along with other members of the Snow family. Gardner was also ordained to the Office of a Priest at this time by Orson Pratt.

In 1834 he was ordained to the office of an Elder by John Badger and in 1838 he was ordained to the office of a Seventy by Joseph Young.

By 1840 we find some of the Snow family in Lima, Adams County, Illinois. According to the church records of the Lima Branch at a conference held there October 23, 1840, at the house of Alexander Mills, Hyrum Smith was chosen to act as President, with James C. Snow (the son of Gardner) as Clerk. Elder Gardner Snow was sustained as Bishop of the Lima Branch, and was ordained to the office of High Priest by Hyrum Smith.

The family lived for a time at Yelrome, Hancock County, near Lima, Adams County, (2½ miles northeast of Lima.) It was called Yelrome or Morley’s Settlement.

In the spring of 1846, Gardner left Nauvoo in common with all the Saints by reason of hostile foes, who were then preparing to come against the Saints as they journeyed to the western part of Pottowatomie County, State of Iowa, to a place known as Council Bluffs, and at a settlement made by the Saints called Cartersville. Gardner was again called upon to resume his bishopric, until 1850 when he crossed the plains to reside in the valleys of the Rocky Mountains. He arrived in Manti, Utah, where he settled November 6 of that same year.

From the union of Gardner Snow and Sarah Hastings, the following children were born: Jonathan Hastings, James Chauncy, Warren Stone, George, Eliza, John, Martha Jane, Gardner Hastings, and Elizabeth Colledge.

Gardner also had other wives, but did not have children by any of them except Sarah Hastings.

Sometime before 1850 he married Obedience B. _______________, who died in 1850. A notation in the Manti Ward records call her “2nd wife of Gardner Snow died before his arrival in Salt Lake Valley.”

He married his third wife, Caroline Maria Nelson Twede, on July 24, 1855, and according to record also took his fourth wife, Anna Maria Hansen (also called Jensen) upon this same day. His fifth wife was Johannah Augusta Iverson.

On July 9, 1874, Gardner was ordained to a Patriarch by President Brigham Young.

Gardner died in his 97th year on the 17 November, 1889 in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, and was buried in the Manti Cemetary.

The above was taken from records from Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Submitted by Aldyth Riggs Quilter, 113 Robber’s Roost Lane, Cedar City, Utah 84720 on 6/1/95 with a notation “This history was taken from a book written by Gardner and Sarah Snow and family “Valiant in the Faith.”




 


A True Reckord of the Genealogy of Gardner Snow

















Permission was finally obtained from his father, Levi, only through the intercession of his mother. After the ice was broken, Erastus was baptized 3 February 1833 in Lake Derby at Charleston, by his older brother William.
















The work of conversion continued, and the Gospel leaven was leavening the hearts of God-fearing men and women and children in the community. By the time Elders Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson returned the next spring at the command of the Prophet, others among the Snows and related families were almost ready for baptism.

On June 8, 1833, a conference was held in Bath, at which Orson Pratt ordained William Snow a High Priest. They came to St. Johnsbury on June 13 and preached upon the scattering of Israel and more revelations and miracles at their gathering. The original journal of Orson gives a graphic description of the setting for the entrance of Gardner Snow and his wife into the Church.
















On the 15th I went to visit Mr. Harvey’s family. I conversed with and found them some believing. A young woman was there whose name was Emily Harvey. She had been sick about twelve weeks and vomited much blood; and it was supposed by many that she could not live many days. She was desirous that I should pray for her that she might be healed; at the same time covenanting before God to obey the Gospel. Therefore I prayed for and laid my hands upon her in the name of Jesus Christ and she was immediately healed.
















He continued to hold meetings in St. Johnsbury and towns nearby, preaching “the Gospel and prophecies.”
















On the 18th I attended a meeting in the same place (St. Johnsbury) Brother Zerubbabel (Snow), having returned from the west, preached. After meeting I baptized six, whose names are as follows: Gardner Snow, Willard Snow, Lucina Snow, Jacob Gates, Mary Gates and Emily Harvey; the last named person having been healed three days before, by the power of God. In the evening we came together and held a confirmation meeting.(7)
















Others baptized on June 18, were Lucina, mother of Erastus, Willard, his brother, and Mary, his sister who had married Jacob Gates in March. Nine of the brothers and sisters of Erastus became members of the Church.
















Orson stated he then held 35 meetings in counties in northern Vermont. When he returned to St. Johnsbury on July 26th he “preached upon the difference between faith and knowledge, and baptized Sally Snow.” This was Sarah, the wife of Gardner.
















Gardner Snow as well-respected in the community, and the Snow and Farr families were in good circumstances. However, their conversion to the Gospel of Jesus Christ – taking the word of God as a guide through the scriptures of the Bible and the recently printed Book of Mormon – had brought many changes in their lives.
















The spirit of gathering now rested upon Gardner and Sally and their family. In 1836 they made preparations to leave St. Johnsbury for Kirtland, Ohio, a journey of some 700 miles. A record of their departure in June 1836, is found in The Town of St. Johnsbury:
















Quite a number of families of the town, including the Snows, sold their farms and went off to the Promised Land, which at that time was Kirtland, Ohio. They went in large canvas-covered wagons, men, women and children and all their household goods. Seventy years afterwards a woman who witnessed the scene said, “I remember seeing them start off, and one woman stopped as they passed the East Village graveyard, and went to visit her child’s grave before they left the place forever.” After the migration of the Snows there was not much left to make Chesterfield a popular resort.(14)
















Like Abraham of old, Gardner Snow and his family – his brother Levi (and those of his family who had not responded in 1834 to the word of the Lord “for the strength of the Lord’s House to gather up to Zion,”) – and other faithful Church members – bade adieu to their friends and left their homes and properties – for the West.
















The course they took in their covered wagons must have carried them across Vermont in a southwesterly direction to the south of Lake Champlain; thence across the vast state of New York, utilizing what few and poor roads were in existence, threading their toilsome way around, or fording or ferrying the numerous streams in their pathway; then across Pennsylvania near the shore of Lake Erie to their destination at Kirtland. The journey is those days of fully 700 miles must have required a whole month.






























Gardner Snow died 17 Nov 1889 age 97. Manti, Utah.
















The above was taken from Daughters of Utah Pioneers records. Submitted by Tessie Alberts, 4422 South 100 West, Ogden, Utah – taken from Book: “Valiant to the Faith the Lives of Gardner Snow and Sarah S. Hastings Snow” pg no. 1 to 17. Compiled by Ellen and Archibald Bennett.









My great-great-great-grandparent Gardner Snow as born 15 Feb. 1793, in the town of Chesterfield, Cheshire, Co., New Hampshire, the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr. He spent the first twenty-five years of his life in the town of his birth. There, in 1814, he married Sarah Sawyer Hastings, generally known as Sally. Here also, their second son, James Chauncey Snow, was born 11 Jan., 1817. he was my great-great-grandfather. Gardner Snow’s father moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1804, Gardner himself moved there in 1818.

GARDNER SNOW































The above was taken from Daughters of Utah Pioneers records. Submitted by Tessie Alberts, 4422 South 100 West, Ogden, Utah – taken from Book: “Valiant to the Faith the Lives of Gardner Snow and Sarah S. Hastings Snow” pg no. 1 to 17. Compiled by Ellen and Archibald Bennett.















GARDNER SNOWMy great-great-great-grandparent Gardner Snow as born 15 Feb. 1793, in the town of Chesterfield, Cheshire, Co., New Hampshire, the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr. He spent the first twenty-five years of his life in the town of his birth. There, in 1814, he married Sarah Sawyer Hastings, generally known as Sally. Here also, their second son, James Chauncey Snow, was born 11 Jan., 1817. he was my great-great-grandfather. Gardner Snow’s father moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1804, Gardner himself moved there in 1818.















The family of Winslow Farr, cousin of Gardner Snow, lived about thirty miles north of St. Johnsbury at Charleston, Orleans Co., Vermont. On May 14, 1832, there came into Charleston two “Mormon” missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, both then just over 20. They had traveled many long miles afoot, without purse or scrip, and preached wherever they were led by the Spirit. They tarried in Charleston ten days and preached seven times in this region. “In these parts,” wrote Orson Pratt in his journal, “the Lord wrought by our hands many miracles of hearing.”















One of these remarkable incidents closely affected the family of Gardner Snow. Winslow Farr’s wife, Olive Hovey Freeman, then 33 years of age, had been a constant sufferer for nearly seven years and was a helpless invalid. She had been under the care of several physicians who had pronounced her case hopeless. The Farrs heard that the missionaries preaching in their neighborhood believed in the healing of the sick by administration. They sent one of their sons, a mere boy, to go out and find the two “Mormon elders and invite them to come to the Farr home. The lad went on his errand, not knowing by sight either of the men he was sent to find.















After searching for some time he met a young man whom he suspected was one of the elders. He stopped this man and asked if he was not one of the “Mormons” preaching in the town. Orson Pratt replied that he was, and the boy made known his errand. At this particular time the two elders had become separated from each other, and Elder Pratt and the boy went to the Farr home. There they found the family and some of the curious neighbors in waiting. The sick woman in her emaciated and weakened condition was lying upon her bed, to all appearances in the last stage of life.















Elder Orson Pratt, although young and inexperienced in the ordinance of administering to the sick, and without oil or his missionary companion, went forward to the bedside of the sick woman and softly took her by the hand.















“Do you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ?” he asked her.















Although she was too weak to reply by word, there was a perceptible nod of her head in the affirmative. Elder Pratt then asked those present to kneel with him in prayer and unite their faith with his in behalf of the patient. They did so. After offering a prayer, Elder Pratt took her by the right hand and asking her name, said unto her, “Olive, in the name of Jesus of Nazareth, I command you to be made whole, and promise you that you shall live until you are satisfied with life.”















She was healed and made whole in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself and sat up in bed, called for her clothes, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family that there was no sleep that night.















Not only was she healed but, true to the promise given, although she was much older than Elder Pratt, she outlived him many years, and died at the age of 94 in Big Cottonwood, Utah.















This miracle of healing created a great stir in Charleston and adjoining towns. Many joined the Church. Among them my great-great-great grandparents Gardner Snow and his family.















On June 18, 1833, Gardner Snow was baptized by Elder Orson Pratt, and his wife Sally Snow, joined the Church on July 26 of the same year. On August 24, Gardner was ordained a Priest. In the winter of 1834 he was ordained an Elder and appointed to preside over the branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. He and his cousin, Erastus Snow, frequently went to preach the Gospel in adjacent towns, and many were convinced of the truth and accepted baptism. Probably Gardner Snow did not dream, when he was giving Erastus his first training in missionary work, that he was schooling one who would become an outstanding missionary in the Church, and who would later establish a mission in far-off Scandinavia.















The spirit of gathering now rested upon Gardner Snow and his family. In 1836 they made a journey of about 700 miles overland to Kirtland, Ohio, traveling in large, canvas-covered wagons. In Kirtland he was ordained a Seventy, and on Dec. 21 he received a patriarchal blessing from Joseph Smith, Sr., in which these significant words were used: “Thou shalt have the power, like Abraham, to bless thy posterity. Be careful and God will make thee great and powerful on the earth. Thy life shall be lengthened out.”















In 1837 he received his blessings in the Kirtland Temple along with the Seventies Quorum to which he belonged. With them he journeyed in the famous Kirtland Camp, nearly a thousand miles from Kirtland to Far West, Missouri. Deaths occurred all too frequently, usually of children. On October 2, they reached Far West and were met by the First Presidency and other leading officials of the Church, having traveled a whole distance of 870 miles. The brethren, says the Prophet, “Provided for them like men of God, for they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days.















From Far West they moved twenty-five miles to the north and settled at Adam-ondi-Ahman. It was a beautiful spot but not long to be their resting place. Already mobs inflamed with hatred against the Mormons were gathering in great numbers and threatening them with destruction. The Saints were forbidden to leave the town under pain of death and were shot at whenever they attempted to go in search of food. Some of the brethren perished from starvation. In dire straits the Saints had to leave the place and abandon their homes. As they journeyed away they were fired upon by the mob and threatened. Several of the brethren died from fatigue and privation, and were buried by the wayside without a coffin. It was in the midst of this impending peril, while the men at Adam-ondi-Ahman were standing continuously of guard, momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Gardner Snow died and was buried just six weeks old.















They arrived at Far West just in time to participate in all the outrageous mobbings and abuse of the inhabitants by the army which carried their Prophet and other leaders off as prisoners. After this the Saints were driven from Missouri by the exterminating order of Governor Boggs. “In the winter of 1839 together with all the Saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob,” wrote Gardner Snow.















In Illinois they established a new home at a place known as Morley’s Settlement, or Yelrome. On Oct. 23, 1840, he was ordained a High Priest by Hyrum Smith and was appointed Bishop of the Lima Branch organized there.















Again in 1844 and 1845 mobs burst upon their quiet settlement and drove them from their homes, burning their houses and property. With the Saints, they were driven from Nauvoo and lived for a time in the vicinity of Council Bluffs, Iowa.















In the year 1850 Gardner Snow crossed the plains to Utah. Joseph Young was President of the Company, with Winslow Farr as Captain of the first fifty, and Gardner Snow as Captain of the second fifty. The latter settled at Manti, Utah, participating in all the hardships and exciting events of pioneer days there. In Manti and in Sanpete County he held a number of responsible civic and Church positions, being finally ordained a Patriarch.















By this time his sons and daughters had all married, and when his long and useful life closed, Nov. 17, 1889, at the age of nearly 97, the blessing given by Patriarch Joseph Smith, Sr., had been abundantly fulfilled. The blessings of Abraham were his. Like Abraham of old, he had proved faithful under all tests and trials, and he died, bequeathing to his posterity a glorious heritage of a righteous life and example, and name that should be honored till the last generation of time.















The above was submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Mildred S. Rose, April 25, 1962.

The family of Winslow Farr, cousin of Gardner Snow, lived about thirty miles north of St. Johnsbury at Charleston, Orleans Co., Vermont. On May 14, 1832, there came into Charleston two “Mormon” missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, both then just over 20. They had traveled many long miles afoot, without purse or scrip, and preached wherever they were led by the Spirit. They tarried in Charleston ten days and preached seven times in this region. “In these parts,” wrote Orson Pratt in his journal, “the Lord wrought by our hands many miracles of hearing.”
One of these remarkable incidents closely affected the family of Gardner Snow. Winslow Farr’s wife, Olive Hovey Freeman, then 33 years of age, had been a constant sufferer for nearly seven years and was a helpless invalid. She had been under the care of several physicians who had pronounced her case hopeless. The Farrs heard that the missionaries preaching in their neighborhood believed in the healing of the sick by administration. They sent one of their sons, a mere boy, to go out and find the two “Mormon elders and invite them to come to the Farr home. The lad went on his errand, not knowing by sight either of the men he was sent to find.
After searching for some time he met a young man whom he suspected was one of the elders. He stopped this man and asked if he was not one of the “Mormons” preaching in the town. Orson Pratt replied that he was, and the boy made known his errand. At this particular time the two elders had become separated from each other, and Elder Pratt and the boy went to the Farr home. There they found the family and some of the curious neighbors in waiting. The sick woman in her emaciated and weakened condition was lying upon her bed, to all appearances in the last stage of life.
Elder Orson Pratt, although young and inexperienced in the ordinance of administering to the sick, and without oil or his missionary companion, went forward to the bedside of the sick woman and softly took her by the hand.
“Do you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ?” he asked her.
Although she was too weak to reply by word, there was a perceptible nod of her head in the affirmative. Elder Pratt then asked those present to kneel with him in prayer and unite their faith with his in behalf of the patient. They did so. After offering a prayer, Elder Pratt took her by the right hand and asking her name, said unto her, “Olive, in the name of Jesus of Nazareth, I command you to be made whole, and promise you that you shall live until you are satisfied with life.”
She was healed and made whole in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself and sat up in bed, called for her clothes, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family that there was no sleep that night.
Not only was she healed but, true to the promise given, although she was much older than Elder Pratt, she outlived him many years, and died at the age of 94 in Big Cottonwood, Utah.
This miracle of healing created a great stir in Charleston and adjoining towns. Many joined the Church. Among them my great-great-great grandparents Gardner Snow and his family.
On June 18, 1833, Gardner Snow was baptized by Elder Orson Pratt, and his wife Sally Snow, joined the Church on July 26 of the same year. On August 24, Gardner was ordained a Priest. In the winter of 1834 he was ordained an Elder and appointed to preside over the branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. He and his cousin, Erastus Snow, frequently went to preach the Gospel in adjacent towns, and many were convinced of the truth and accepted baptism. Probably Gardner Snow did not dream, when he was giving Erastus his first training in missionary work, that he was schooling one who would become an outstanding missionary in the Church, and who would later establish a mission in far-off Scandinavia.
The spirit of gathering now rested upon Gardner Snow and his family. In 1836 they made a journey of about 700 miles overland to Kirtland, Ohio, traveling in large, canvas-covered wagons. In Kirtland he was ordained a Seventy, and on Dec. 21 he received a patriarchal blessing from Joseph Smith, Sr., in which these significant words were used: “Thou shalt have the power, like Abraham, to bless thy posterity. Be careful and God will make thee great and powerful on the earth. Thy life shall be lengthened out.”
In 1837 he received his blessings in the Kirtland Temple along with the Seventies Quorum to which he belonged. With them he journeyed in the famous Kirtland Camp, nearly a thousand miles from Kirtland to Far West, Missouri. Deaths occurred all too frequently, usually of children. On October 2, they reached Far West and were met by the First Presidency and other leading officials of the Church, having traveled a whole distance of 870 miles. The brethren, says the Prophet, “Provided for them like men of God, for they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days.
From Far West they moved twenty-five miles to the north and settled at Adam-ondi-Ahman. It was a beautiful spot but not long to be their resting place. Already mobs inflamed with hatred against the Mormons were gathering in great numbers and threatening them with destruction. The Saints were forbidden to leave the town under pain of death and were shot at whenever they attempted to go in search of food. Some of the brethren perished from starvation. In dire straits the Saints had to leave the place and abandon their homes. As they journeyed away they were fired upon by the mob and threatened. Several of the brethren died from fatigue and privation, and were buried by the wayside without a coffin. It was in the midst of this impending peril, while the men at Adam-ondi-Ahman were standing continuously of guard, momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Gardner Snow died and was buried just six weeks old.
They arrived at Far West just in time to participate in all the outrageous mobbings and abuse of the inhabitants by the army which carried their Prophet and other leaders off as prisoners. After this the Saints were driven from Missouri by the exterminating order of Governor Boggs. “In the winter of 1839 together with all the Saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob,” wrote Gardner Snow.
In Illinois they established a new home at a place known as Morley’s Settlement, or Yelrome. On Oct. 23, 1840, he was ordained a High Priest by Hyrum Smith and was appointed Bishop of the Lima Branch organized there.
Again in 1844 and 1845 mobs burst upon their quiet settlement and drove them from their homes, burning their houses and property. With the Saints, they were driven from Nauvoo and lived for a time in the vicinity of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
In the year 1850 Gardner Snow crossed the plains to Utah. Joseph Young was President of the Company, with Winslow Farr as Captain of the first fifty, and Gardner Snow as Captain of the second fifty. The latter settled at Manti, Utah, participating in all the hardships and exciting events of pioneer days there. In Manti and in Sanpete County he held a number of responsible civic and Church positions, being finally ordained a Patriarch.
By this time his sons and daughters had all married, and when his long and useful life closed, Nov. 17, 1889, at the age of nearly 97, the blessing given by Patriarch Joseph Smith, Sr., had been abundantly fulfilled. The blessings of Abraham were his. Like Abraham of old, he had proved faithful under all tests and trials, and he died, bequeathing to his posterity a glorious heritage of a righteous life and example, and name that should be honored till the last generation of time.
The above was submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Mildred S. Rose, April 25, 1962.


GARDNER SNOW

Gardner Snow was born 04 February, 1793, to James Snow and Abagail Farr, in Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire. He was the fourth child. He first married Sarah Sawyer Hastings, sometimes referred to as Sally. A daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Salome Burt, she was born on November 30, 1814 at Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She died 27 April, 1855 at Manti, Sanpete County, Utah.

In June 1833, three years after the Church was organized, Orson Pratt was doing missionary work in the Chesterfield area, and he baptized and confirmed Gardner Snow, along with other members of the Snow family. Gardner was also ordained to the Office of a Priest at this time by Orson Pratt.

In 1834 he was ordained to the office of an Elder by John Badger and in 1838 he was ordained to the office of a Seventy by Joseph Young.

By 1840 we find some of the Snow family in Lima, Adams County, Illinois. According to the church records of the Lima Branch at a conference held there October 23, 1840, at the house of Alexander Mills, Hyrum Smith was chosen to act as President, with James C. Snow (the son of Gardner) as Clerk. Elder Gardner Snow was sustained as Bishop of the Lima Branch, and was ordained to the office of High Priest by Hyrum Smith.

The family lived for a time at Yelrome, Hancock County, near Lima, Adams County, (2½ miles northeast of Lima.) It was called Yelrome or Morley’s Settlement.

In the spring of 1846, Gardner left Nauvoo in common with all the Saints by reason of hostile foes, who were then preparing to come against the Saints as they journeyed to the western part of Pottowatomie County, State of Iowa, to a place known as Council Bluffs, and at a settlement made by the Saints called Cartersville. Gardner was again called upon to resume his bishopric, until 1850 when he crossed the plains to reside in the valleys of the Rocky Mountains. He arrived in Manti, Utah, where he settled November 6 of that same year.

From the union of Gardner Snow and Sarah Hastings, the following children were born: Jonathan Hastings, James Chauncy, Warren Stone, George, Eliza, John, Martha Jane, Gardner Hastings, and Elizabeth Colledge.

Gardner also had other wives, but did not have children by any of them except Sarah Hastings.

Sometime before 1850 he married Obedience B. _______________, who died in 1850. A notation in the Manti Ward records call her “2nd wife of Gardner Snow died before his arrival in Salt Lake Valley.”

He married his third wife, Caroline Maria Nelson Twede, on July 24, 1855, and according to record also took his fourth wife, Anna Maria Hansen (also called Jensen) upon this same day. His fifth wife was Johannah Augusta Iverson.

On July 9, 1874, Gardner was ordained to a Patriarch by President Brigham Young.

Gardner died in his 97th year on the 17 November, 1889 in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, and was buried in the Manti Cemetary.

The above was taken from records from Daughters of Utah Pioneers. Submitted by Aldyth Riggs Quilter, 113 Robber’s Roost Lane, Cedar City, Utah 84720 on 6/1/95 with a notation “This history was taken from a book written by Gardner and Sarah Snow and family “Valiant in the Faith.”
A True Reckord of the Genealogy of Gardner Snow


Born in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of N. Hampshire, Feb. 15 A.D. 1793, who was the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr Snow my Mother his wife and she was the Daughter of Jonathan Farr my Grandfather and James Snow was the son of Zerubable Snow and Mary Trobridge Snow his wife. Zerubable Snow was the son of John Snow.

At two and twenty I was Married in the year 1814 taking Sarah S. Hastings the Daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Saloma Burt Hastings for my wife, in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of New Hampshire, where I remained until my wife gave birth to three sons Jonathan H., James C. and Warren S. Snow and in the year 1818 I removed to the Town of St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County, State of Vermont. Here my wife gave birth to George Snow, Eliza Snow, John Snow and Martha S. Snow and in June, 1833 I was baptized and confirmed and ordained a Priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and in the winter of 1834 I was Ordained an Elder under the hands of John Badger to Preside over the Branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury in 1836 I removed with my family to Kirtland, Ohio and in the winter of 1837 I was Ordained into the Quorum of the seventies in the Attic Story of the Temple of the Lord, and in the month of April of the same year I received my washing and anointing. In 1838 I moved to Adam Ondiahman, Davis County, State of Missouri (and while on my Journey my wife gave Birth to Gardner H. Snow at Dayton, Ohio.) and saw the remains of an Alter which Father Adam Erected after he was driven out of the Garden of Eden. Here in this place my little son Gardner H. Died and was Burried by my own hands by reason of Mob violence being so great and in the winter of 1839 together with all the saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob and in Jan., 1840 my wife gave birth to Elisabeth C. Snow and on the 23 of October following I was Ordained a Bishop under the hands of Hyrum Smith who Died a Martyr with his Brother Joseph a Mighty Prophet of God in Carthage Gaol on the 27 June 1844 and in the fall of 1845 I was again driven by Mob violence into Nauvoo suffering Great Loss of Property with other __________ the general conflagration and in the winter of 1846 I received my Washing and Anointing in the Temple of the Lord in Nauvoo and in the spring of the same year I left Nauvoo in common with all the saints by reason of hostile foes who were then preparing to come against us and journeyed to the western part of Pottawattomie County State of Iowa and a place then known as council Bluffs and at a settlement made by the Saints called Cartersville. I was called upon to resume my Bishoprick until 1850 when I moved with my family to the valleys of the Rockey Mountains and arrived in the City of Manti on the 6 day November of the same year where I remained ever since. (it now being 1874) and on the 25 day of April 1855 my wife Sarah the Partner of my early youth departed this life as calmly as a Summer Morning age 60 Years 2 Months and 22 days and after the departure of my first wife I took Caroline M. N. Tweedy, Ann M. Hansen Johanah A. Iverson and Caroline Iverson as my wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God and when Sanpete County was organized I was Electer County Commissioner for a long term and served in that capacity until I was Elected Probate Judge for said County by the joint vote of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah and also served as a member of the High Council of this stake of Zion for a number of years and on the 9 day of July 1874 I was Ordained a Patriarch in Salt Lake City by Pres. Young’s Office under the hands of the First Presidency or the Church and on the 11 of the same year and month I received my second Anointing and I am now acting in the capacity of my Office and Calling as Patriarch.

Gardner Snow’s Book of Patriarchal Blessings – Vol.124, pp.2-4, (Church Historical Department, Salt Lake City, Utah.)

Gardiner Snow, son of James Snow and Abigail Farr, b. 15 Feb. 1793, Chesterfield, Cheshire, N.H.; bap. June, 1833, by Orson Pratt; ordained 9 July, 1874 by Brigham Young; residence Manti; d. 17 Nov. 1889.

“Genealogy of Patriarchs,” p. 73.

-viii-

The above looks like it came from a book.
The Lives of Gardner and Sarah S. H. Snow

In Chesterfield, New Hampshire

Birth and Parentage

Gardner Snow was born February 15, 1793, in the town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr. Both of his parents were of pure New England ancestry; and an extensive pedigree has been worked out of their lineage. Gardner Snow and Winslow Farr, were almost like brothers – their fathers and mothers being full brothers and sisters and they were life-long companions, sharing together the greatest joys of their lives, and likewise the bitterest persecutions and most heart-breaking sorrows. Winslow as the father of three well-known sons – Aaron Freeman Farr, Lorin Farr and Winslow Farr, Jr.

In the same town of Chesterfield lived pretty “Sally Hastings” who evidently accompanied Gardner frequently to these dancing frolics. Ordinarily the gentleman and lady rode to the ball on the same horse – the lady on a pillion, behind her companion. Once a young lady went to a ball with her escort, each riding on a separate horse, which was regarded as an unheard of evidence of extravagance.

Gardner and Sarah Sawyer Hastings Snow

It was in the “old meeting house” in Centre village that Gardner Snow led his bride, Sally Hastings, through the porch at the west end, walking between the rows of square pews, up the broad aisle to the front of the pulpit, and they were pronounced man and wife. Rev. Abraham Wood was minister of the First congregational Church at that time. Their marriage is recorded in the Vital Records as, “Gardner Snow and Sally Hastings married Nov. 30, 1814. Residence of Groom and of Bride Chesterfield.” (1) Gardner later wrote of this memorable occasion:

At two and twenty I was Married in the year 1814, taking Sarah S. Hastings, the Daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Saloma Burt Hastings, for my wife, in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of New Hampshire;(2)
This lovely young lady ad been christened with the more formal name of Sarah Sawyer Hastings, being named for her maternal grandmother, Sarah Sawyer. Sarah, a Hebrew name meaning Princess, was a favorite among her relatives. However, “Sally” was the name by which she was known most of her life, and also in the recording of her family in the Chesterfield, N.H. records:
Gardner and Sally’s firstborn, whose birth occurred 25 May 1815, was given the name of her father, Jonathan Hastings. Jonathan lived until he was about 30 years old. The second son, James Chauncey, was born 11 January 1817; and the third, Warren Stone Snow, 5 June 1818. Each of these sons lived to become the progenitor of a numerous posterity. Gardner’s brief recording of these events was:

(Chesterfield) where I remained until my wife gave birth to three sons: Jonathan H., James C. & Warren S. Snow.
Gardner’s uncles Levi Snow and Asahel Farr, moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont as early as 1804. His father, James, and most of his brothers and sisters went there by 1818. Alpheus, Gardner’s brother, as a young man had learned blacksmithing, and remained in the West Village of Chesterfield to practice his trade. Gardner stayed there also for the next several years, farming and making numerous buckets, tubs and barrels to support his growing family.
The following account by Gardner will bear amplifying.

In the year 1818 I removed to the Town of St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County, State of Vermont. Here my wife gave birth to George Snow, Eliza Snow, John Snow & Martha J. Snow.
3. Conversion to Mormonism
Amid industrious, yet peaceful surroundings the children of Gardner and Sally grew up. By the year 1832 Jonathan, the eldest, was 17, and Martha the youngest was five. The boys labored on the farm and fields and were learning the cooper trade. Then an event happened that changed the whole course of their lives.

The family of Winslow Farr, cousin of Gardner, lived about 30 miles north of St. Johnsbury at Charleston, Orleans County, Vermont. On May 14, 1832 there came into Charleston two Mormon missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, both then just over twenty. They had traveled many long miles afoot from Ohio, without purse or scrip, carrying their change of clothing in their hands. They preached wherever they were led by the Spirit.(1)

While on this mission they tarried in Charleston ten days, and preached seven times in this region. “In these parts,” wrote Orson Pratt in his journal, “the Lord wrought by our hands many miracles of healing.”(2)

One of these remarkable incidents closely affected the Farr family. An account as told by cousin Winslow Farr’s son, Lorin, explained the miraculous healing of his mother, and his family’s conversion to the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ.

In the spring of 1832, when Lorin was 11 years of age, in the month of May, the family, for the first time, heard the gospel preached by Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, who had come all the way from Ohio to Charleston on foot, a distance of 800 miles. They stayed over night with his uncle Isaac Farwell Freeman, who came to Father (Winslow) Farr next morning, he being a prominent man in the town, to see if he could get permission for them to preach in the school house. Father Farr asked what kind of religion they had to preach, and was answered that they said that the Lord had raised up a prophet by the name of Joseph Smith; that he had found a record of gold plates, and was inspired of the Lord to translate the characters on those plates which gave an account of the aborigines of this continent; that the Lord had revealed Himself to this prophet, and had organized the true Church of Christ on the earth, with all the gifts and blessings of the ancient gospel. These elders represented that they had been commissioned by divine authority, had been sent there to preach the gospel and wanted to obtain a house to preach in. Accordingly Father Farr gave them the use of the school house and an appointment was given out for preaching that afternoon. Lorin and his father went to hear the elders. Orson Pratt spoke first. Neither of the elders were 21 years of age. Orson Pratt commenced to preach to a crowded house, and told them the nature of his mission. He said they had come to preach the principles of the everlasting gospel, as taught by Jesus Christ and his apostles. In his discourse Orson said that the gifts of healing and the working of miracles was in the Church for the Lord’s people in these days; that the Lord had called upon all men to repent, for the true Church was not on the earth until organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith; after which they must be baptized for remission of sins, and that they should then receive the gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands. He also discoursed on many other interesting things pertaining to the gospel. Afterwards Lyman Johnson arose and delivered one of the most powerful testimonies pertaining to the mission of Joseph Smith, and the great work of the last days, that Lorin ever heard. He also said that he knew the Book of Mormon was true, for he had seen an angel and he had made this known unto him.

Father Farr invited Orson Pratt home with him and Mr. Freeman took Lyman Johnson. After supper the evening was spent in the house of Mr. Farr, to a late hour, in conversing upon the glorious principles advanced by Elder Pratt. Father and Mother Farr were devout people and belonged to the Congregational Church. Before retiring to bed, Father Farr asked Elder Pratt to pray. In his prayer he prayed for the healing of Mrs. Farr (Olive Freeman) who had been sick for nearly seven years with the liver complaint, and had been confined to her bed most of the time. Her husband had been to a great expense with the doctors, who said that she had gone into consumption, and could not live another year. After prayer Elder Pratt went to the bed-side, where Mother Farr was lying, and as they had mentioned her sickness during the evening’s conversation, and had talked freely upon the gifts of healing, he asked her if she had faith to believe that she could be healed. She said she had faith; she knew that all things were possible with God. If it was His will that she might be healed, she believed that it would be done.

Elder Pratt then took her by the right hand and asked her her name, and said unto her, “Olive, the name of Jesus of Nazareth I command you to be made whole.” She was healed and made whole, in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself and sat up in the bed, called for her clothes, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family tat there was no sleep that night.

Next day, Mrs. Farr went to meeting, and the day after, and on hearing the third sermon, Lorin’s Father, Mother, and their cousin William Snow, brother of Erastus Snow, since one of the Apostles, obeyed the gospel, they being the three first in that part of the country. Elders Pratt and Johnson continued to labor some two or three weeks, preaching nearly every day, and baptized and built up a branch of the Church of about sixty members.(3)

Olive lived to fulfill the promise made to her by Orson Pratt, that “she should be healed and live until she was satisfied with life.” Not only was she healed but, although she was much older than Elder Pratt, she outlived him many years, and died at the age of 94, in Big Cottonwood, Utah. Her funeral service was held at the residence of the then Apostle John Henry Smith, whose wife was the granddaughter of Sister Farr and the daughter of her son Lorin. The latter related the circumstances of his mother’s healing at her services, and of the family’s conversion, with others, into the Church. He then requested the assembly present to kneel in prayer, as did the group over 60 years previously when requested by Elder Orson Pratt to kneel and unite their faith with his in behalf of his afflicted mother. Elder Milando Pratt, a son of Orson Pratt, then arose before the assemblage which was still kneeling, and pronounced the benediction.(4)

This miracle of healing created a great sensation in the towns of Charleston and St. Johnsbury and vicinity. They heard of it very soon, and William and Zerubbabel Snow, who had witnessed the healing of Olive, also hearkened to the word of God as expounded by the young missionaries. Between May 14 and May 24 Orson Pratt recorded that he and his companion baptized 14 persons, “among whom were Winslow Farr, William Snow and Zerubbabel Snow.”(5)

On June 15, after an interval in other adjoining towns, the missionaries again arrived in Charleston; tarried 11 days; held six meetings and baptized 11 persons. The entire family of Winslow Farr was baptized in the Clyde River near the father’s house. Winslow Farr was a well-to-do farmer of the community, and a prominent and influential citizen, being judge of the county court. Naturally their conversion attracted much attention.

On July 9 the missionaries were back in Charleston, and held three meetings during the six days they were there. They ordained John Badger an Elder, cousin William Snow a Priest, and Winslow Farr a Teacher. They then left this fertile field to which they had been guided by the inspiration of the Lord, for other districts, and did not return until October 15, when they held two meetings at Charleston. On the 20th they ordained William Snow an Elder, and on the 26th they took him with them on a missionary journey into the west for some three or four hundred miles. After November 8th he was Orson Pratt’s sole companion. By January their circuit had brought them back to Charleston, where they held a meeting. On January 28 Orson Pratt started on his return journey to Kirtland, Ohio.

Among the eager listeners to Orson Pratt’s teachings was a boy of 14, destined to become later one of the leading Apostles and Pioneers of the Church. This boy was Erastus Snow, a cousin to Gardner. He later remembered that at fourteen years of age he had “sufficient knowledge of the scriptures to know” that the doctrines “correspond with the gospel of the Ancients.” We quote from what Erastus wrote in his journal:

While hearing Orson Pratt converse on the scriptures, and read and recite sundry revelations and manifestations to Joseph Smith, the Holy Ghost descended upon me, bearing witness that it was true and that they were messengers of God. This testimony has never departed from me, but has often been renewed and confirmed in the experiences of my life…I prayed to God to soften the hearts of my parents that I might have the privilege of obeying the Gospel.(6)
Permission was finally obtained from his father, Levi, only through the intercession of his mother. After the ice was broken, Erastus was baptized 3 February 1833 in Lake Derby at Charleston, by his older brother William.
The work of conversion continued, and the Gospel leaven was leavening the hearts of God-fearing men and women and children in the community. By the time Elders Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson returned the next spring at the command of the Prophet, others among the Snows and related families were almost ready for baptism.

On June 8, 1833, a conference was held in Bath, at which Orson Pratt ordained William Snow a High Priest. They came to St. Johnsbury on June 13 and preached upon the scattering of Israel and more revelations and miracles at their gathering. The original journal of Orson gives a graphic description of the setting for the entrance of Gardner Snow and his wife into the Church.
On the 15th I went to visit Mr. Harvey’s family. I conversed with and found them some believing. A young woman was there whose name was Emily Harvey. She had been sick about twelve weeks and vomited much blood; and it was supposed by many that she could not live many days. She was desirous that I should pray for her that she might be healed; at the same time covenanting before God to obey the Gospel. Therefore I prayed for and laid my hands upon her in the name of Jesus Christ and she was immediately healed.
He continued to hold meetings in St. Johnsbury and towns nearby, preaching “the Gospel and prophecies.”
On the 18th I attended a meeting in the same place (St. Johnsbury) Brother Zerubbabel (Snow), having returned from the west, preached. After meeting I baptized six, whose names are as follows: Gardner Snow, Willard Snow, Lucina Snow, Jacob Gates, Mary Gates and Emily Harvey; the last named person having been healed three days before, by the power of God. In the evening we came together and held a confirmation meeting.(7)
Others baptized on June 18, were Lucina, mother of Erastus, Willard, his brother, and Mary, his sister who had married Jacob Gates in March. Nine of the brothers and sisters of Erastus became members of the Church.
Orson stated he then held 35 meetings in counties in northern Vermont. When he returned to St. Johnsbury on July 26th he “preached upon the difference between faith and knowledge, and baptized Sally Snow.” This was Sarah, the wife of Gardner.
Gardner Snow as well-respected in the community, and the Snow and Farr families were in good circumstances. However, their conversion to the Gospel of Jesus Christ – taking the word of God as a guide through the scriptures of the Bible and the recently printed Book of Mormon – had brought many changes in their lives.
The spirit of gathering now rested upon Gardner and Sally and their family. In 1836 they made preparations to leave St. Johnsbury for Kirtland, Ohio, a journey of some 700 miles. A record of their departure in June 1836, is found in The Town of St. Johnsbury:
Quite a number of families of the town, including the Snows, sold their farms and went off to the Promised Land, which at that time was Kirtland, Ohio. They went in large canvas-covered wagons, men, women and children and all their household goods. Seventy years afterwards a woman who witnessed the scene said, “I remember seeing them start off, and one woman stopped as they passed the East Village graveyard, and went to visit her child’s grave before they left the place forever.” After the migration of the Snows there was not much left to make Chesterfield a popular resort.(14)
Like Abraham of old, Gardner Snow and his family – his brother Levi (and those of his family who had not responded in 1834 to the word of the Lord “for the strength of the Lord’s House to gather up to Zion,”) – and other faithful Church members – bade adieu to their friends and left their homes and properties – for the West.
The course they took in their covered wagons must have carried them across Vermont in a southwesterly direction to the south of Lake Champlain; thence across the vast state of New York, utilizing what few and poor roads were in existence, threading their toilsome way around, or fording or ferrying the numerous streams in their pathway; then across Pennsylvania near the shore of Lake Erie to their destination at Kirtland. The journey is those days of fully 700 miles must have required a whole month.
Gardner Snow died 17 Nov 1889 age 97. Manti, Utah.
Born in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of N. Hampshire, Feb. 15 A.D. 1793, who was the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr Snow my Mother his wife and she was the Daughter of Jonathan Farr my Grandfather and James Snow was the son of Zerubable Snow and Mary Trobridge Snow his wife. Zerubable Snow was the son of John Snow.

At two and twenty I was Married in the year 1814 taking Sarah S. Hastings the Daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Saloma Burt Hastings for my wife, in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of New Hampshire, where I remained until my wife gave birth to three sons Jonathan H., James C. and Warren S. Snow and in the year 1818 I removed to the Town of St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County, State of Vermont. Here my wife gave birth to George Snow, Eliza Snow, John Snow and Martha S. Snow and in June, 1833 I was baptized and confirmed and ordained a Priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and in the winter of 1834 I was Ordained an Elder under the hands of John Badger to Preside over the Branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury in 1836 I removed with my family to Kirtland, Ohio and in the winter of 1837 I was Ordained into the Quorum of the seventies in the Attic Story of the Temple of the Lord, and in the month of April of the same year I received my washing and anointing. In 1838 I moved to Adam Ondiahman, Davis County, State of Missouri (and while on my Journey my wife gave Birth to Gardner H. Snow at Dayton, Ohio.) and saw the remains of an Alter which Father Adam Erected after he was driven out of the Garden of Eden. Here in this place my little son Gardner H. Died and was Burried by my own hands by reason of Mob violence being so great and in the winter of 1839 together with all the saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob and in Jan., 1840 my wife gave birth to Elisabeth C. Snow and on the 23 of October following I was Ordained a Bishop under the hands of Hyrum Smith who Died a Martyr with his Brother Joseph a Mighty Prophet of God in Carthage Gaol on the 27 June 1844 and in the fall of 1845 I was again driven by Mob violence into Nauvoo suffering Great Loss of Property with other __________ the general conflagration and in the winter of 1846 I received my Washing and Anointing in the Temple of the Lord in Nauvoo and in the spring of the same year I left Nauvoo in common with all the saints by reason of hostile foes who were then preparing to come against us and journeyed to the western part of Pottawattomie County State of Iowa and a place then known as council Bluffs and at a settlement made by the Saints called Cartersville. I was called upon to resume my Bishoprick until 1850 when I moved with my family to the valleys of the Rockey Mountains and arrived in the City of Manti on the 6 day November of the same year where I remained ever since. (it now being 1874) and on the 25 day of April 1855 my wife Sarah the Partner of my early youth departed this life as calmly as a Summer Morning age 60 Years 2 Months and 22 days and after the departure of my first wife I took Caroline M. N. Tweedy, Ann M. Hansen Johanah A. Iverson and Caroline Iverson as my wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God and when Sanpete County was organized I was Electer County Commissioner for a long term and served in that capacity until I was Elected Probate Judge for said County by the joint vote of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah and also served as a member of the High Council of this stake of Zion for a number of years and on the 9 day of July 1874 I was Ordained a Patriarch in Salt Lake City by Pres. Young’s Office under the hands of the First Presidency or the Church and on the 11 of the same year and month I received my second Anointing and I am now acting in the capacity of my Office and Calling as Patriarch.

Gardner Snow’s Book of Patriarchal Blessings – Vol.124, pp.2-4, (Church Historical Department, Salt Lake City, Utah.)

Gardiner Snow, son of James Snow and Abigail Farr, b. 15 Feb. 1793, Chesterfield, Cheshire, N.H.; bap. June, 1833, by Orson Pratt; ordained 9 July, 1874 by Brigham Young; residence Manti; d. 17 Nov. 1889.

“Genealogy of Patriarchs,” p. 73.

-viii-

The above looks like it came from a book.
The Lives of Gardner and Sarah S. H. Snow

In Chesterfield, New Hampshire

Birth and Parentage

Gardner Snow was born February 15, 1793, in the town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr. Both of his parents were of pure New England ancestry; and an extensive pedigree has been worked out of their lineage. Gardner Snow and Winslow Farr, were almost like brothers – their fathers and mothers being full brothers and sisters and they were life-long companions, sharing together the greatest joys of their lives, and likewise the bitterest persecutions and most heart-breaking sorrows. Winslow as the father of three well-known sons – Aaron Freeman Farr, Lorin Farr and Winslow Farr, Jr.

In the same town of Chesterfield lived pretty “Sally Hastings” who evidently accompanied Gardner frequently to these dancing frolics. Ordinarily the gentleman and lady rode to the ball on the same horse – the lady on a pillion, behind her companion. Once a young lady went to a ball with her escort, each riding on a separate horse, which was regarded as an unheard of evidence of extravagance.

Gardner and Sarah Sawyer Hastings Snow

It was in the “old meeting house” in Centre village that Gardner Snow led his bride, Sally Hastings, through the porch at the west end, walking between the rows of square pews, up the broad aisle to the front of the pulpit, and they were pronounced man and wife. Rev. Abraham Wood was minister of the First congregational Church at that time. Their marriage is recorded in the Vital Records as, “Gardner Snow and Sally Hastings married Nov. 30, 1814. Residence of Groom and of Bride Chesterfield.” (1) Gardner later wrote of this memorable occasion:

At two and twenty I was Married in the year 1814, taking Sarah S. Hastings, the Daughter of Jonathan Hastings and Saloma Burt Hastings, for my wife, in the Town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, State of New Hampshire;(2)
This lovely young lady ad been christened with the more formal name of Sarah Sawyer Hastings, being named for her maternal grandmother, Sarah Sawyer. Sarah, a Hebrew name meaning Princess, was a favorite among her relatives. However, “Sally” was the name by which she was known most of her life, and also in the recording of her family in the Chesterfield, N.H. records:
Gardner and Sally’s firstborn, whose birth occurred 25 May 1815, was given the name of her father, Jonathan Hastings. Jonathan lived until he was about 30 years old. The second son, James Chauncey, was born 11 January 1817; and the third, Warren Stone Snow, 5 June 1818. Each of these sons lived to become the progenitor of a numerous posterity. Gardner’s brief recording of these events was:

(Chesterfield) where I remained until my wife gave birth to three sons: Jonathan H., James C. & Warren S. Snow.
Gardner’s uncles Levi Snow and Asahel Farr, moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont as early as 1804. His father, James, and most of his brothers and sisters went there by 1818. Alpheus, Gardner’s brother, as a young man had learned blacksmithing, and remained in the West Village of Chesterfield to practice his trade. Gardner stayed there also for the next several years, farming and making numerous buckets, tubs and barrels to support his growing family.
The following account by Gardner will bear amplifying.

In the year 1818 I removed to the Town of St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County, State of Vermont. Here my wife gave birth to George Snow, Eliza Snow, John Snow & Martha J. Snow.
3. Conversion to Mormonism
Amid industrious, yet peaceful surroundings the children of Gardner and Sally grew up. By the year 1832 Jonathan, the eldest, was 17, and Martha the youngest was five. The boys labored on the farm and fields and were learning the cooper trade. Then an event happened that changed the whole course of their lives.

The family of Winslow Farr, cousin of Gardner, lived about 30 miles north of St. Johnsbury at Charleston, Orleans County, Vermont. On May 14, 1832 there came into Charleston two Mormon missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, both then just over twenty. They had traveled many long miles afoot from Ohio, without purse or scrip, carrying their change of clothing in their hands. They preached wherever they were led by the Spirit.(1)

While on this mission they tarried in Charleston ten days, and preached seven times in this region. “In these parts,” wrote Orson Pratt in his journal, “the Lord wrought by our hands many miracles of healing.”(2)

One of these remarkable incidents closely affected the Farr family. An account as told by cousin Winslow Farr’s son, Lorin, explained the miraculous healing of his mother, and his family’s conversion to the restored Gospel of Jesus Christ.

In the spring of 1832, when Lorin was 11 years of age, in the month of May, the family, for the first time, heard the gospel preached by Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, who had come all the way from Ohio to Charleston on foot, a distance of 800 miles. They stayed over night with his uncle Isaac Farwell Freeman, who came to Father (Winslow) Farr next morning, he being a prominent man in the town, to see if he could get permission for them to preach in the school house. Father Farr asked what kind of religion they had to preach, and was answered that they said that the Lord had raised up a prophet by the name of Joseph Smith; that he had found a record of gold plates, and was inspired of the Lord to translate the characters on those plates which gave an account of the aborigines of this continent; that the Lord had revealed Himself to this prophet, and had organized the true Church of Christ on the earth, with all the gifts and blessings of the ancient gospel. These elders represented that they had been commissioned by divine authority, had been sent there to preach the gospel and wanted to obtain a house to preach in. Accordingly Father Farr gave them the use of the school house and an appointment was given out for preaching that afternoon. Lorin and his father went to hear the elders. Orson Pratt spoke first. Neither of the elders were 21 years of age. Orson Pratt commenced to preach to a crowded house, and told them the nature of his mission. He said they had come to preach the principles of the everlasting gospel, as taught by Jesus Christ and his apostles. In his discourse Orson said that the gifts of healing and the working of miracles was in the Church for the Lord’s people in these days; that the Lord had called upon all men to repent, for the true Church was not on the earth until organized by the Prophet Joseph Smith; after which they must be baptized for remission of sins, and that they should then receive the gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands. He also discoursed on many other interesting things pertaining to the gospel. Afterwards Lyman Johnson arose and delivered one of the most powerful testimonies pertaining to the mission of Joseph Smith, and the great work of the last days, that Lorin ever heard. He also said that he knew the Book of Mormon was true, for he had seen an angel and he had made this known unto him.

Father Farr invited Orson Pratt home with him and Mr. Freeman took Lyman Johnson. After supper the evening was spent in the house of Mr. Farr, to a late hour, in conversing upon the glorious principles advanced by Elder Pratt. Father and Mother Farr were devout people and belonged to the Congregational Church. Before retiring to bed, Father Farr asked Elder Pratt to pray. In his prayer he prayed for the healing of Mrs. Farr (Olive Freeman) who had been sick for nearly seven years with the liver complaint, and had been confined to her bed most of the time. Her husband had been to a great expense with the doctors, who said that she had gone into consumption, and could not live another year. After prayer Elder Pratt went to the bed-side, where Mother Farr was lying, and as they had mentioned her sickness during the evening’s conversation, and had talked freely upon the gifts of healing, he asked her if she had faith to believe that she could be healed. She said she had faith; she knew that all things were possible with God. If it was His will that she might be healed, she believed that it would be done.

Elder Pratt then took her by the right hand and asked her her name, and said unto her, “Olive, the name of Jesus of Nazareth I command you to be made whole.” She was healed and made whole, in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself and sat up in the bed, called for her clothes, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family tat there was no sleep that night.

Next day, Mrs. Farr went to meeting, and the day after, and on hearing the third sermon, Lorin’s Father, Mother, and their cousin William Snow, brother of Erastus Snow, since one of the Apostles, obeyed the gospel, they being the three first in that part of the country. Elders Pratt and Johnson continued to labor some two or three weeks, preaching nearly every day, and baptized and built up a branch of the Church of about sixty members.(3)

Olive lived to fulfill the promise made to her by Orson Pratt, that “she should be healed and live until she was satisfied with life.” Not only was she healed but, although she was much older than Elder Pratt, she outlived him many years, and died at the age of 94, in Big Cottonwood, Utah. Her funeral service was held at the residence of the then Apostle John Henry Smith, whose wife was the granddaughter of Sister Farr and the daughter of her son Lorin. The latter related the circumstances of his mother’s healing at her services, and of the family’s conversion, with others, into the Church. He then requested the assembly present to kneel in prayer, as did the group over 60 years previously when requested by Elder Orson Pratt to kneel and unite their faith with his in behalf of his afflicted mother. Elder Milando Pratt, a son of Orson Pratt, then arose before the assemblage which was still kneeling, and pronounced the benediction.(4)

This miracle of healing created a great sensation in the towns of Charleston and St. Johnsbury and vicinity. They heard of it very soon, and William and Zerubbabel Snow, who had witnessed the healing of Olive, also hearkened to the word of God as expounded by the young missionaries. Between May 14 and May 24 Orson Pratt recorded that he and his companion baptized 14 persons, “among whom were Winslow Farr, William Snow and Zerubbabel Snow.”(5)

On June 15, after an interval in other adjoining towns, the missionaries again arrived in Charleston; tarried 11 days; held six meetings and baptized 11 persons. The entire family of Winslow Farr was baptized in the Clyde River near the father’s house. Winslow Farr was a well-to-do farmer of the community, and a prominent and influential citizen, being judge of the county court. Naturally their conversion attracted much attention.

On July 9 the missionaries were back in Charleston, and held three meetings during the six days they were there. They ordained John Badger an Elder, cousin William Snow a Priest, and Winslow Farr a Teacher. They then left this fertile field to which they had been guided by the inspiration of the Lord, for other districts, and did not return until October 15, when they held two meetings at Charleston. On the 20th they ordained William Snow an Elder, and on the 26th they took him with them on a missionary journey into the west for some three or four hundred miles. After November 8th he was Orson Pratt’s sole companion. By January their circuit had brought them back to Charleston, where they held a meeting. On January 28 Orson Pratt started on his return journey to Kirtland, Ohio.

Among the eager listeners to Orson Pratt’s teachings was a boy of 14, destined to become later one of the leading Apostles and Pioneers of the Church. This boy was Erastus Snow, a cousin to Gardner. He later remembered that at fourteen years of age he had “sufficient knowledge of the scriptures to know” that the doctrines “correspond with the gospel of the Ancients.” We quote from what Erastus wrote in his journal:

While hearing Orson Pratt converse on the scriptures, and read and recite sundry revelations and manifestations to Joseph Smith, the Holy Ghost descended upon me, bearing witness that it was true and that they were messengers of God. This testimony has never departed from me, but has often been renewed and confirmed in the experiences of my life…I prayed to God to soften the hearts of my parents that I might have the privilege of obeying the Gospel.(6)



































Garner and Sarah Snow




























Garner Snow born 15 February 1793, Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire

Parents are James and Abigail Farr Snow. He died 17 November, 1889, Manti, Sampete, Utah. Married Sarah Sawyer Hastings daughter of Johnathon and Salome Burt Hastings on 30 November, 1814. After the birth of 3 little boys, Garner and Sarah moved to Vermont where some relatives had settled in 1818 Garner was a well known cooper, an industrious farmer, and a carpenter. In 1832, when the LDS missionaries came, the family was converted and baptized. He served as presiding elder and missionary. In 1836, the family sold their property and moved to Kirtland. Garner was president of the Kirtland cam and president of the 3rd Quorum of Elders. They went with the saints to Missouri where they were expelled by orders of the governor. They settled in Lima, but in 1844 they were compelled to flee Nauvoo.

In 1845 an angry mob burned his home, cooper shop, oats, a cow and a calf, 200 bushels of corn, 30 bushels of potatoes, and other property. Other members of the church met the same fate.

Sarah and Garner left Nauvoo and journeyed to Cartersville, Iowa, where he was assigned to be an overseer of the poor and a bishop. In June 1850, they left from Iowa, arriving in the Valley in October 1850. They moved south to Manti where they contributed their talents and abilities to helping the church and community. In 1855, his beloved Sarah died from a liver complaint. In July 1855 he married 2 women and later 3 more. He said he “took them as his wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God.” There were no children from these wives. He was ordained a patriarch in 1874 by Brigham Young. He was a faithful man to his church and his family.
Taken from ancestry.com

























Gardner and Sarah SnowGardner and Sarah Snow

Replies: 35
Re: Gardner Snow
swedishswan (View posts)Posted: 27 Jan 2009 2:25PM
Classification: Biography
Surnames: Snow
I don't have all of my files with me (I am currently living in England, my files are back home in Sweden), but here is a brief summary.

Richard Snow, b. 21/12/1608, d. 5/5/1677 was the emigrant. He was married to Annis or Avis Barret (or Barrett), b. 1616, d. 1677.

His father was Patrick Snow, b. 8/7/1571, d. 17/1/1638 married to Elizabeth de Tosberry, b. 1573, d. 17/1/1639, all inHartland near Barnstaple, Devonshire, England.

Richard Snow (sometimes spelled Snowe), b. 1547, d. 31/12/1614. Married Alice Mersthell or Musthill, b. 1549, d. 1619.

Patrick Snow or Snowe, b. 1517, d. 26/12/1568 married to Isolda or Isota Debery, b. 1520, d. 8/10/1570.

These people were all from around Barnstaple, Devonshire, England. I am hoping to get down there this summer at some point and actually look in the parish records.

You may be interested to know that Devonshire still holds the largest concentration of the surname Snow in England and you may know that originally Snow was Snaw or Snawe, which is an old Saxon word meaning fair. Given the Saxons were quite fair, I assume the first Snaws must have been either quite fair and/or prematurely went white. What is interesting is that my father, Roland Verl Snow, and his 5 sisters all were prematurely grey in their early 20s. Would be an interesting genetic study, as there is also some premature greying among some of my siblings.

There is also a mention of a Brithtric Snaw being a Saxon nobleman who was here in England when William the Conquerorinvaded in 1066 and was mentioned in the Domesday Book.
Also taken from ancestry.com


Re: Gardner Snow
Re: Gardner Snow
gblack (View posts)Posted: 11 May 2008 11:35AM
Classification: Query
Surnames: Snow















My mother died and left me a copy of the Gardner Snow book. I didn't know she had a copy before she died. I had tried and tried to purchase a copy, but there wasn't a copy available anywhere at any price. I tried to track down the publisher (Roylance Publishing), but that publisher is out of business. I think the owner of Roylance Publishing now lives somewhere in Arizona. The authors of the book were Archibald F. Bennett, Ella M. Bennett, and Barbara Bennett Roach. Archibald Bennett used to be General Secretary of the Utah Genealogical Society. In 1940, Archibald Bennett was called to the Deseret Sunday School Board. In that capacity he wrote other books, including the Book, Family Exaltation. Family Exaltation was a course of study for the LDS Sunday School program that was designed to teach proper genealogical research. Archibald Bennett used the example of the Gardner Snow family in many places in the book. Family Exaltation includes a photograph of Gardner Snow. Also, the book, Valiant in the Faith, Gardner and Sarah Snow and Their Family is available for review at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. I don't believe anyone has made a pdf of the book, as it is still under copyright. However, if you can get me written permission from the copyright owner (whoever that might be now--the book lists the owner as Barbara Bennett Roach), I would be happy to scan the book and upload a pdf to lulu.com or some other site for anyone to access. You might be able to contact Brett and Kathy Larsen at 255 West Main, Castledale, Utah 84513 (if they are still alive), to see if they know whether Barbara Bennett Road is still alive and can be located, or whether her heirs are willing to give their consent.
Also taken from ancestry.com

















baptised by Orson Pratt















Orson baptizes 6, including Jacob Gates. ¶ June 18 [1833].—I baptized six, namely, Gardner Snow, Willard Snow, Lucina Snow, Jacob Gates, Mary Gates and Emily Harvey, the last person named having been healed three days before by the power of God. Jacob Gates (1862–1892) became one of the seven presidents of the Seventy.
Also taken from ancestry.com

















Garner and Sarah SnowGarner Snow born 15 February 1793, Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire

Parents are James and Abigail Farr Snow. He died 17 November, 1889, Manti, Sampete, Utah. Married Sarah Sawyer Hastings daughter of Johnathon and Salome Burt Hastings on 30 November, 1814. After the birth of 3 little boys, Garner and Sarah moved to Vermont where some relatives had settled in 1818 Garner was a well known cooper, an industrious farmer, and a carpenter. In 1832, when the LDS missionaries came, the family was converted and baptized. He served as presiding elder and missionary. In 1836, the family sold their property and moved to Kirtland. Garner was president of the Kirtland cam and president of the 3rd Quorum of Elders. They went with the saints to Missouri where they were expelled by orders of the governor. They settled in Lima, but in 1844 they were compelled to flee Nauvoo.

In 1845 an angry mob burned his home, cooper shop, oats, a cow and a calf, 200 bushels of corn, 30 bushels of potatoes, and other property. Other members of the church met the same fate.

Sarah and Garner left Nauvoo and journeyed to Cartersville, Iowa, where he was assigned to be an overseer of the poor and a bishop. In June 1850, they left from Iowa, arriving in the Valley in October 1850. They moved south to Manti where they contributed their talents and abilities to helping the church and community. In 1855, his beloved Sarah died from a liver complaint. In July 1855 he married 2 women and later 3 more. He said he “took them as his wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God.” There were no children from these wives. He was ordained a patriarch in 1874 by Brigham Young. He was a faithful man to his church and his family.















found on ancestry.com

















baptised by Orson PrattOrson baptizes 6, including Jacob Gates. ¶ June 18 [1833].—I baptized six, namely, Gardner Snow, Willard Snow, Lucina Snow, Jacob Gates, Mary Gates and Emily Harvey, the last person named having been healed three days before by the power of God. Jacob Gates (1862–1892) became one of the seven presidents of the Seventy.
heathergdavisadded this on 10 May 2008History of Orson Pratt (1811–1881) (2) Orson's missions in Ohio and the East from 1832 to 1835. Later missions are briefly mentioned. Timely arrival in Kirtland to be ordained an apostle. Remarkable Visions and Prophetic Almanac, 1845. Helps author memori
found on ancestry.com















Sons of Utah Pioneers - Pioneer Companies















Captain Hckimball















Arrival dated 24 Sep 1818






























































MY SNOW LINEAGE
BY ROXIE LA PREAL CLAPP MONSON (DECEASED)


My mother, Harriet Cecelia Snow Clapp, descended from the same Common Progenitor as
Erastus, Eliza R. and Lorenzo Snow. His name was Richard Snow. He had five sons - Erastus descended from the first son and Eliza R. and Lorenzo descended from the fourth son. My great-grandfather, Gardner Snow, and Erastus Snow were full cousins, making me a first cousin three times removed, and I am the sixth cousin of Eliza R. and Lorenzo, twice removed.

ARCHIBALD F. BENNETT wrote THE LIFE OF GARDNER SNOW - it was still inmanuscript form when he died. His wife, Mrs. Bennett, is also a great granddaughter of Gardner
Snow. In this biography of Gardner Snow I learned that he and Brigham Young were fifth cousins, which makes me a fifth cousin three times removed.

I would like to quote the first paragraph of THE LIFE OF GARDNER SNOW, by Archibald
F. Bennett:

"Like Abraham of old, he early became a follower of righteousness and bore the Priesthood of God to minister among his fellows. Like him, he left his homeland for a promised inheritance in the West. In every fiery test of faith he emerged triumphantly, as did Abraham. He reared his household in faith. Finally, after a long life of nearly a hundred years, this modem Abraham and Patriarch in Israel, was gathered in honor to his fathers, ripe in experience and rich in a numerous and
worthy posterity."

Gardner Snow was born 5 February 1893, in Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. He was the son of James Snow and Abigal Farr. Both of his parents were of pure New England ancestry. He spent the first 25 years of his life in West Chesterfield, New Hampshire, located on the majestic Connecticut River. When West Chesterfield was first settled the land was covered with forests of trees of all
kinds. Gardner and his companions gathered walnuts, chestnuts, hickory nuts, etc., and fished in the Connecticut River for salmon and chad, all of which were in abundance - they also hunted for deer and other wild meat, thus providing their families with excellent food. But they had a real problem to combat - that of wild beasts. Bears and wolves would come at night and eat their flocks. Pioneer life
was hard and a constant struggle against want, cold, and wild beasts. The early pioneers learned to utilize their resources to the very best of their ability. As they cleared the land of the trees they burned the stumps and from the ashes they made charcoal and potash. Then they began to make soap and sugar, and other products which required receptacles, and this resulted in a very important industry, that of coopering. Gardner and his sons learned the cooper trade.

They didn't have many luxuries in this newly-settled region. Due to their frugal manner of living, there was much sickness, fever, and contagious diseases. Many of the children died. Those who did survive were, as a rule, hardy and robust - Gardner Snow being one of those hardy ones who survived and lived to be almost a hundred.
In spite of the difficulties and hardships they had to endure, they were not without
amusements. The men had their wrestling matches, and the women had their husking and quilting bees. Dancing was one of their favorite social entertainments. They also attended Church regularly.

The houses were all built with long kitchens, which served as a reception room, work room, and dance hall. There was a spinning wheel in one comer of the kitchen in almost every home. A fiddler, no matter how poorly he played, was indispensable. When they held those so-called Kitchen dances, they sometimes had two and three fiddlers, who took turns playing, and "They Danced All Night." It was customary for the young man to escort his lady-friend to the dances, riding behind him on a horse. It was considered extravagant to use two horses. It was at one of these Kitchen Balls that Gardner Snow met his future wife, Sarah Sawyer Hastings. Their courtship was short - they were married in their crudely-constructed Church, and they lived in Chesterfield until their third son was born, one of which was James Chauncey Snow, my grandfather.

In 1818 Gardner, and his wife Sarah, moved to St. Johnsbury, where the rest of Gardner's family lived .. The homes there were also built very similar to those in Chesterfield - all of them had deep bellied fireplaces, with blazing logs over which swung the crane with the pendant pots and pans and kettles. The fireplace gave much cheer as they gathered around it in the evenings, probably for their Home Evening program. The fire in the fireplace must be forever burning. If it went out they had to go to the nearest neighbor to borrow live coals, as they had no matches in those days. In the summer, however, they built a fire in a hollow Elm tree, which would burn for weeks at a time, and they knew they could always get live coals from the hollow Elm tree.

The Snows were an industrious family. As soon as the land was cleared so they could grow their wool and flax, the spinning wheels began to spin. All of their clothing was homespun. By the year 1832 their eldest son, Jonathan, was 17, and Martha, the youngest, was 5. The boys were learning the cooper trade and farming. Then an event happened that changed the entire course of their lives.

The family of Winslow Farr, cousin to Gardner, lived about 30 miles from St. Johnsbury. He heard that there were Mormon missionaries preaching in that vicinity, and that they believed in the gift of healing by administration. Winslow's wife had been a helpless invalid for five years. The doctors had given her up, and they were just waiting for her to die. She was only 33 years old. When Winslow heard of the healings of the Mormon missionaries, he sent his young son out to find them and ask them to come and see if they could heal his wife. The young son told his father that he didn't know what a Mormon preacher looked like - how was he to fInd them. "Go, my son, you will know them when you see them." And he did - he hadn't been gone long until he saw a man he thought could be a Mormon preacher. He very shyly walked up to the man and said, "Pardon me, Sir, but are you one of those Mormon preachers?" "I am," said Orson Pratt, "what may I do for you my young friend?" Then the boy told him his story and asked him if he would come to his home with him. Elder Pratt's companion was not with him at the time so he went along with the boy. When he got
there he found the family and several curious neighbors waiting for him. He walked over to the bedside of the sick woman and said, "Do you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ?" She was too weak to answer him but Elder Pratt perceived a slight nod of the head in the affirmative. Then he asked all in the room to kneel with him in prayer, and unite their faith with his on her behalf. After the prayer Elder Pratt took the sick woman gently by the hand and smiled at her, and then he laid his hands upon her head and gave her a blessing, in which he promised her that she would have a complete recovery, and live upon the earth as long as life was sweet to her. Her healing was instantaneous, and she lived to be almost a hundred - she outlived Elder Pratt.

Orson Pratt recorded in his journal that between May 14 and May 24 - just ten days later, they baptized the entire family of Winslow Farr, and also William and Zarubbel Snow. Winslow Farr was a well-to-do farmer and was Judge of the County Court. For a prominent citizen like that to join the Mormon Church created quite a stir, to say the least.

Among the eager listeners to Orson Pratt's teachings, was a young boy 14, named Erastus Snow. He writes in his journal that the Holy Ghost descended upon him while he was listening to Elder Pratt, and he knew what he was teaching was true. He began to pray that the Lord would soften the hearts of his parents and permit him to join the Church. It was some time before they gave their permission for him to join the Mormon Church. His mother finally interceded for him and he was allowed to join. He was baptized, and his mother came into the Church some time later. His father,
however, and two of his sons never did join. They were well-respected citizens and read their Bible daily, but so far as they were concerned, this was good enough for them.

Elders Pratt and Johnson returned to Charleston, but in the Spring the Prophet Joseph Smith commanded them to return to St. Johnsbury. I can just picture these two young missionaries telling the Prophet that they had already worked that territory. But the Prophet knew what he was doing, and that is why he commanded them to return to St. Johnsbury. When they arrived there they found many more of the Snows and related families almost ready for baptism. Orson Pratt records in his journal that Gardner Snow was among the many they baptized on the 18 day of June, 1833. Gardner's wife, Sarah, joined the Church about a month later, and his son, James Chauncey, joined in October of that same year.

Erastus Snow relates in his journal of going to adjacent counties with Gardner Snow to preach the gospel. Erastus and James Chauncy Snow were ordained Priests about the same time, and they were sent out together - James 17, and Erastus 16. What a picture the journal gives of these two young boys traveling alone as far as Albany, teaching the gospel, and they convinced many of the truthfulness of their message.
Probably Gardner Snow didn't dream, when he was giving his young cousin, Erastus,
missionary lessons, that he would some day become one of the leading missionaries in the Church, and would establish a mission in far off Scandinavia, and elsewhere, and that he would become one of the great Apostles of the Church.

In 1836 Gardner and his family moved to Kirtland, Ohio, a distance of about 700 miles. The ftrst thing that caught their eyes when they arrived was the Temple. The Prophet was away at the time they arrived, but he soon returned. Brother Bennett tells of their association with the Prophet and of their attending some of the glorious meetings held in the Temple. He tells of one which lasted all day. The Prophet spoke for three hours, and then he called on each of the Twelve to speak. In the evening the Saints were all given a chance to get up and bear their testimonies. It was a glorious occasion. Some spoke in tongues, others prophesied, and all bore their testimonies. At the end they all arose and shouted Hosanna! Hosanna! Hosanna! To the Most High God.

When I think that some of my grandparents, and great-grandparents witnessed some of these marvelous manifestations, and labored as missionaries under the direction of the Prophet Joseph Smith, HOW COULD I EVER DOUBT - a testimony of the truthfulness of this gospel was born and bred in me.

I had four great-grandparents, and four grandparents who were among the very first to cross the plains. Grandmother Jane Cecelia Snow walked all the way from Winter Quarters to the Salt Lake Valley at the age of 14. Both Gardner Snow, and his son, James Chauncey, were ordained Patriarchs and very active in Civic and Church Affairs.

[Stamped on the bottom of the copy this was transcribed from was:
"This copy, made available through the courtesy of the National Society DAUGHTERS OF UTAH PIONEERS, may not be reproduced for monetary gain."]

BIOGRAPHY OF GARDNER SNOW
My great-great-great-grandparent Gardner Snow was born 15 February 1793, in the town of Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire, the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr. He spent the first twenty-five years of his life in the town of his birth.
There, in 1814, he married Sarah Sawyer Hastings, generally known as Sally. Here also, their second son, James Chauncey Snow, was born 11 January 1817. He was my greatgreat-grandfather. Gardner Snow's father moved to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1804, Gardner himself moved there in 1818.

The family of Winslow Farr, cousin of Gardner Snow, lived about thirty miles north of St. Johnsbury at Charleston, Orleans County, Vermont. On May 14,1832, there came into Charleston two "Mormon" missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman E. Johnson, both then just over 20. They had traveled many long miles afoot, without purse or scrip,
and preached wherever they were led by the Spirit. They tarried in Charleston ten days and preached seven times in this region. "In these parts," wrote Orson Pratt in his journal, "the Lord wrought by our hands many miracles of healing." One of these remarkable incidents closely affected the family of Gardner Snow. Winslow Farr's wife, Olive Hovey Freeman, then 33 years of age, had been a constant sufferer for nearly seven years and was a helpless invalid. She had been under the care of several physicians who had pronounced her case hopeless. The Farrs heard that the
missionaries preaching in their neighborhood believed in the healing of the sick by
administration. They sent one of their sons, a mere boy, to go out and find the two
"Mormon elders and invite them to come to the Farr home. The lad went on his errand,
not knowing by sight either of the men he was sent to find.

After searching for some time he met a young man who he suspected was one of the
elders. He stopped this man and asked if he was not one of the "Mormons" preaching in
the town. Orson Pratt replied that he was, and the boy made known his errand. At this
particular time the two elders had become separated from each other, and Elder Pratt and the boy went to the Farr home. There they found the family and some of the curious neighbors in waiting. The sick woman in her emaciated and weakened condition was lying upon her bed, to all appearances in the last stage oflife. Elder Orson Pratt, although young and inexperienced in the ordinance of administering to the sick, and without oil or his missionary companion, went forward to the bedside of the sick woman and softly took her by the hand. "Do you believe in the Lord Jesus Christ?" he asked her. Although she was too weak to reply by word, there was a perceptible nod of her head in the affirmative. Elder Pratt then asked those present to kneel with him in prayer and unite their faith with his in behalf of the patient. They did so. After offering a prayer, Elder Pratt took her by the right hand and asking her name, said unto her, "Olive, in the name of Jesus of Nazareth, I command you to be made whole, and promise you that you shall live until you are satisfied with life." She was healed and made whole in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself and sat up in bed, called for her clothes, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family that there was no sleep that night. Not only was she healed but, true to the promise given, although she was much older than Elder Pratt, she outlived him many years, and died at the age of 94 in Big Cottonwood, Utah.

This miracle of healing created a great stir in Charleston and adjoining towns.
Many joined the Church. Among them my great-great-great-grandparents Gardner Snow
and his family. On June 18, 1833, Gardner Snow was baptized by Elder Orson Pratt, and his wife Sally Snow, joined the Church on July 26 of the same year. On August 24 Gardner was ordained a Priest. In the winter of 1834 he was ordained an Elder and appointed to preside over the branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. He and his cousin, Erastus Snow, frequently went to preach the Gospel in adjacent towns, and many were convinced of the truth and accepted baptism. Probably Gardner Snow did not dream, when he was giving Erastus his first training in missionary work, that he was schooling one who would become an outstanding missionary in the Church, and who would later establish a mission in far-off Scandinavia.

The spirit of gathering now rested upon Gardner Snow and his family. In 1836 they made a journey of about 700 miles overland to Kirtland, Ohio, traveling in large,
canvas-covered wagons. In Kirtland he was ordained a Seventy, and on December 21 he
received a patriarchal blessing from Joseph Smith, Sr., in which these significant words were used: "Thou shalt have the power, like Abraham, to bless thy posterity. Be careful and God will make thee great and powerful on the earth. They life shall be lengthened out."

In 1837 he received his blessings in the Kirtland Temple along with the Seventies
Quorum to which he belonged. With them he journeyed in the famous Kirtland Camp,
nearly a thousand miles from Kirtland to Far West Missouri. Deaths occurred all too
frequently, usually of children. On October 2 they reached Far West and were met by the First Presidency and other leading officials of the Church, having traveled a whole distance of 870 miles. The brethren, says the Prophet, "Provided for them like men of God, for they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days."

From Far West they moved twenty-five miles to the north and settled at Adamondi-
Ahman. It was a beautiful spot but not long to be their resting place. Already mobs
inflamed with hatred against the Mormons were gathering in great numbers and
threatening them with destruction. The saints were forbidden to leave the town under
pain of death and were shot at whenever they attempted to go in search of food. Some of the brethren perished from starvation. In dire straits the Saints had to leave the place and abandon their homes. As they journeyed away they were fired upon by the mob and threatened. Several of the brethren died from fatigue and privation, and were buried by the wayside without a coffin. It was in the midst of this impending peril, while the men at Adam-ondi-Ahman were standing continuously on guard, momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Gardner Snow died and was buried just six weeks old.

They arrived at Far West just in time to participate in all the outrageous mobbings
and abuse of the inhabitants of the army which carried their Prophet and other leaders off as prisoners. After this the Saints were driven from Missouri by the exterminating order of Governor Boggs. "In the winter of 1839 together with all the Saints I moved with my family to Illinois to excape the wrath of an ungodly mob," wrote Gardner Snow.

In Illinois they established a new home at a place known as Morley's Settlement, or Yelrome. On October 23, 1840, he was ordained a High Priest by Hyrum Smith and was appointed Bishop of the Lima Branch organized there.

Again in 1844 and 1845 mobs burst upon their quiet settlement and drove them from their homes, burning their houses and property. With the Saints, they were driven
from Nauvoo and lived for a time in the vicinity of Council Bluffs, Iowa.

In the year 1850 Gardner Snow crossed the plains to Utah. Joseph Young was President of the Company, with Winslow Farr as Captain of the first fifty, and Gardner Snow as Captain of the second fifty. The latter settled in Manti, Utah, participating in all
the hardships and exciting events of pioneer days there. In Manti and Sanpete County he held a number of responsible civic and Church positions, being finally ordained a
Patriarch.

By this time his sons and daughters had all married, and when his long and useful
life closed, November 17, 1889, at the age of nearly 97, the blessing given by Patriarch Joseph Smith, Sr., had been abundantly fulfilled. The blessings of Abraham were his. Like Abraham of old, he had proved faithful under all tests and trials, and he died, bequeathing to his posterity a glorious heritage of a righteous life and example, and a name that should be honored til the last generation of time.

[Stamped on the bottom of the copy this was transcribed from was:
"This copy, made available through the courtesy of the National Society
OF DAUGHTERS OF UTAH PIONEERS, may not be reproduced for monetary gain."]



Garner and Sarah Snow
Garner Snow born 15 February 1793, Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire

Parents are James and Abigail Farr Snow. He died 17 November, 1889, Manti, Sampete, Utah. Married Sarah Sawyer Hastings daughter of Johnathon and Salome Burt Hastings on 30 November, 1814. After the birth of 3 little boys, Gard ner and Sarah moved to Vermont where some relatives had settled in 1818.

Gardner was a well known cooper, an industrious farmer, and a carpenter. In 1832, when the LDS missionaries came, the family was converted and baptized. He served as presiding elder and missionary.

In 1836, the family sold their property and moved to Kirtland. Gardner was president of the Kirtland cam and president of the 3rd Quorum of Elders. They went with the saints to Missouri where they were expelled by orders of the governor. They settled in Lima, but in 1844 they were compelled to flee Nauvoo.

In 1845 an angry mob burned his home, cooper shop, oats, a cow and a calf, 200 bushels of corn, 30 bushels of potatoes, and other property. Other members of the church met the same fate.

Sarah and Gardner left Nauvoo and journeyed to Cartersville, Iowa, where he was assigned to be an overseer of the poor and a bishop. In June 1850, they left from Iowa, arriving in the Valley in October 1850. They moved south to Manti where they contributed their talents and abilities to helping the church and community. In 1855 his beloved Sarah died from a liver complaint. In July 1855 he married 2 women and later 3 more. He said he "took them as his wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God." There were no children from these wives. He was ordained a patriarch in 1874 by Brigham Young. He was a faithful man to his church and his family.

BRIEF BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of GARDNER SNOW
Gardner Snow was born in Chesterfield (now West Chesterfield), Cheshire County, State of New Hampshire, on February 15, 1793. He was married to Sally Hastings in
1814 and moved to St. Johnsbury. Caledonia County, State of Vermont in 1818. His
father was James Snow (brother to levi Snow) who married Abigail Farr of Chesterfield
and they moved to St. Johnsbury in 1804 where she died.

Gardner Show was baptized, confirmed, and ordained a Priest in the Church of
Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints in June 1833. In the winter of 1834. he was
appointed to preside over a branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. In 1836 he and
his family moved to Kirtland, Ohio, and in the winter of 1837 he was ordained into
the Quorum of Seventies. In 1838 he moved to Adam-ondi-Ahman. During the winter
of the following year, he moved with the Saints to Illinois in order to escape the
wrath of an angry mob.

On October 23, 1840 he was ordained a Bishop at the hands of Hyrum Smith.
the fall of 1845, he and others were again driven by mob violence into Nauvoo. enduring a great many hardships. In the spring of 1836 he left Nauvoo with the Saints
and traveled to Council Bluffs. The year 1850 found him located in the valleys of
the Rocky Mountains. On November 6. 1850. he and his family arrived in Manti City
where he lived for the remainder of his life.

When Sanpete County was organized he was chosen as a county commissioner and
served in that capacity until elected probate judge on July 9, 1974. He was ordained
a Patriarch by Brigham Young, which office he held until his death at the age of 96 years, 9 months, and 2 days on November 17, 1889.

He died as he had lived, a faithful Latter-day Saint. He left a wide circle of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

NOTE: Information obtained from news article written by his son, Warren S. Snow.
and printed in the Deseret News, November 27, 1889.


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