Monday, May 11, 2015

SARAH SAWYER HASTINGS (SNOW) 1795-1855

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Sarah Sawyer Hastings (Snow).]






Burial: Manti Cemetery, Manti, Sanpete County, Utah, USA


SARAH SAWYER HASTINGS SNOW
BIRTHDATE: 2 February 1795 Chesterfield, New Hampshire
DEATH: 27 April 1855 Manti, Sanpete County, Utah
PARENTS: Jonathan Hastings Salome Burt
PIONEER: 1 October 1850 Joseph Young Company Wagon Train
SPOUSE: Gardner Snow
MARRIED: 30 November 1814 Chesterfield, New Hampshire
DEATH SP: 17 November 1889 Manti, Sanpete County, Utah

CHILDREN:
Jonathan Hastings 25 May 1815
James Chauncey 11 January 1817
Warren Stone 15 June 1818
George Washington 8 September 1820
Eliza 11 January 1823 (died at 1 month)
John 25 February 1825 (died at 3 weeks)
Martha Jane (Edmiston) 23 September 1827
Gardner Hastings 21 August 1838 (died at 6 months)
Elizabeth Coolidge (Crawford) 20 January 1840

Sarah, often called Sally, was born on February 2, 1795 in Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Sally’s father died in Hartford, Connecticut when she was three years old, a great tragedy for his young widow and five little children. Both of her grandfathers, Josiah Hastings and Enos Burt, had been Revolutionary Soldiers. Among her foreparents were notable, leading citizens in numerous communities in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

In her youth, Sally became a favorite companion of Gardner Snow, of West Chesterfield. Gardner and Sally married on November 30, 1814 at the “old meeting house in Centre village.” They lived in Chesterfield for several years where Gardner practiced the important trade of coopering, making buckets, pails, churns, tubs, and barrels.

In 1832, an event happened that changed the whole course of their lives. Two young missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson, came to the area preaching that the original church of Jesus Christ had been restored, and they had power to heal the sick. Olive, the wife of Gardner’s cousin, Winslow Farr, had been ill for seven years, with no hope of recovery. Winslow asked the Elders to come to his home. After a prayer Elder Pratt took Olive’s hand, and asked her if she believed in the Lord Jesus Christ. Being too weak to speak, she nodded her head. Elder Pratt placed his hands on her head and promised that she would be healed. She was healed and made whole immediately, by her faith, and by the power of the Priesthood. There was much rejoicing for the Farr family that night. As a result of Olive’s healing and the teachings of the Elders, a number of the Farr and Snow families were converted to the Church.

The next year Gardner had received a testimony and was baptized June 16th, and Sarah July 26th. Sons James and Warren were baptized in the fall. In 1834, Gardner presided over the Branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. Sarah’s name follows Gardner’s on his “Record of Names” that he kept, along with other members of the Branch.

In 1836, Sarah and Gardner’s family with other faithful Church members, left their property, and journeyed 500 miles to gather with the Saints in Kirland, Ohio. Here Gardner purchased several acres of land. Warren recorded that seeing Joseph Smith for the first time was a deep spiritual experience, a feeling of joy in having the privilege of looking upon a man that had seen angels, also the Son of God.” His soul “was filled with rapture.” They all thrilled on hearing about the glorious manifestations that had been witnessed in the Kirtland Temple!

There was no peace in Kirtland. On July 5, 1838 Gardner and Sally began their journey with the Kirtland Camp to Missouri. They arrived in Far West October 2nd and camped on the public square. Isaac Morley furnished a beef, and they were provided for as they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days. The Camp continued on to Adam-ondi-Ahman, their assigned place of settlement.

The mob rushed from DeWitt to Adam-ondi-Ahman. It was in the midst of impending peril, while the men at Adam-ondi-Ahman were standing continuously on guard momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Sally and Gardner – the one who bore his name – died, and was buried, at the tender age of six weeks. Heartbroken, Gardner wrote: “Here in this place my little son Gardner H. died and was buried by my own hands by reason of mob violence being so great.”

On the same day the armed men attached at Haun’s Mill, Sally’s first grandchild, Sarah Jane, was born to Eliza Ann and James, October 30th. The mob, with blackened faces, came right into the home where the sick and weak mother and baby were alone. Eliza recognized the apostate leader, John F. Boynton, by his voice, as the former apostle, the missionary who had taught the Gospel to her Carter family in Maine. She called John F. Boynton by name, and reproached him for his apostasy from the truth he had once taught her. He slunk shamefacedly away, calling the mob off with him. To her courageous attitude, both she and the child owed their lives.

Gardner and Sally left Nauvoo with all the Saints, in the Spring of 1846 “by reason of hostile foes who were then preparing to come against us, and journeyed to the western part of Pottawattomie Co.” The Snow families remained in Iowa until 1850, as some families were needed to stay and grow crops to help those arriving from the States and England. On June 15th, they left with the Joseph Young Wagon Train. It was by faith they threaded their way up the Elkhorn and along the Platte, past Chimney Rock, and on to South Pass, down the Sweetwater to Independence Rock and finally over Big Mountain and into Salt Lake Valley. On October 1, 1850, Elder Joseph Young, Gardner, Sally, and Elizabeth, age ten, arrived in the Valley. By November 6th, they had traveled another 130 miles south to Sanpete valley.

Although very little is recorded about Sarah (Sally) Snow, it is understood she was of inestimable influence in the lives of her children and grandchildren and exhibited great faith, love, charity, and leadership qualities among her family and friends.

Gardner wrote of his bellowed Sarah: “On the 25 day of April 1855 my wife Sarah the Partner of my early youth departed this life as calmly as a Summer Morning age 60 years 2 months and 22 days…Her obituary stated she died of liver complaint. She was baptized in 1833, and gathered with the saints in Kirtland, Ohio in 1836; passed through the persecutions in Missouri, and Illinois, enduring all her sufferings with patience and fortitude, and on November 6, 1850, arrived in the city of Manti in Sanpete County, Utah.

The above appears to be from a book “Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude – p. 32.

SARAH SAWYER HASTINGS SNOW

Born 2 Feb. 1795, Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire
Died 27 Apr, 1855, at Manti, Sanpete, Utah
Arrived 1 Oct. 1850 in Joseph Young’s Co.
Traveled by oxteam and wagon

BIOGRAPHY: Sarah Sawyer Hastings Snow
BORN: 2 Feb. 1795 Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire
DIED: 27 Apr. 1855 at Manti, Sanpete, Utah
PARENTS: Jonathan Hastings and Salome Burt
PIONEER: 1 Oct. 1850, Joseph Young’s Co, Gardner Snow Capt. 2nd 50
SPOUSE: Gardner Snow, son of James Snow and Abigail Farr
BORN: 15 Feb. 1793 Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire
MARRIED: 30 Nov. 1814 Chesterfield, Cheshire, New Hampshire
DIED: 17 Nov. 1889 Manti, Sanpete, Utah

Children of Sarah Sawyer Hastings and Gardner Snow:
1. Jonathan Hastings b. 25 May, 1815 Chesterfield, Cheshire, N.H.
d. by Mar 1849 Independence, Cuyahoga, Ohio
2. James Chauncey b. 11 Jan 1817 Chesterfield, Cheshire, N.H.
d. 30 Apr 1884, Pettyville, Sanpete, Utah
m. 10 Feb 1838 Eliza Ann Carter
m. 20 Feb 1856 Lydia Chadwickk
m. Dec 1856 Jane Cecelia Roberts
m. 13 Mar 1857 Ann Clark
3. Warren Stone b. 15 Jun 1818 Chesterfield, Cheshire, N.H.
d. 19 Sep 1896 Manti, Sanpete, Utah
m. 23 Dec 1841 Mary Ann Vorhees
m. 16 May 1855 Drucilla Higgins
m. 2 Dec 1856 Maria Baum
m. 20 Apr 1857 Sarah Elizabeth Whiting
m. 20 Apr 1857 Mary Ann Brown
4. George Washington b. 8 Sep 1820 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
d. 12 Oct 1905 Manti, Sanpete, Utah
m. 11 Mar 1838 Mary Wells
m. 27 Jan 1857 Eunice Billings Warner
5. Eliza b. 11 Jan 1823 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
d. 15 Feb 1823 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
6. John b. 25 Feb 1825 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
d. 15 Mar 1825 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
7. Martha Jane b. 23 Sep 1827 St. Johnsbury, Caledonia, Vt.
d. 5 Mar 1891 Orangeville, Emery, Utah
m. abt 1842 John Edmiston
8. Gardner Hastings b. 21 Aug 1838 nr. Dayton, Montgomery, Ohio
d. 10 Oct 1838 Adam-ondi-Ahman, Daviess, Mo.
9. Elizabeth Coolidge b. 20 Jan 1840 Morley Settl., Hancock, Ill.
d. 25 Sep 1905 Manti, Sanpete, Utah
m. 2 Feb 1856 John Crawford

Gardner Snow married Caroline Maria Nelson Twede 24 July 1855; Annie Maria Jensen 24 July 1855; Johanna Augusta Iverson, 22 June 1859; Caroline Iverson, 14 Dec. 1868; Thora Henrietta Twede. Each had joined the Church in Denmark, and crossed the plains to Utah. Gardner wrote that after the departure of his first wife he took them as his wives “according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God…”

SARAH SAWYER HASTINGS SNOW, often called Sally, was born Feb. 2, 1795 in Chesterfield, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire, the daughter of Jonathan and Salome Burt Hastings. Sally’s father died in Hartford, Connecticut when she was three years old, a great tragedy for his young widow and five little children. Both of her grandfathers, Josiah Hastings and Enos Burt, had been Revolutionary soldiers. Among her foreparents were notable, leading citizens in numerous communities in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

In her youth Sally became a favorite companion of Gardner Snow, of West Chesterfield, whose family owned the saw and grist mills. He was the son of James Snow and Abigail Farr, born Feb. 15, 1793 at Chesterfield. There were barn raisings, husking bees, and dancing parties to attend. Gardner and Sally married Nov. 30, 1814 at the “old meeting house in Centre village.” The lived in Chesterfield for several years where Gardner practice the important trade of coppering making buckets, pails, churns, tubs, barrels, etc.

After the birth of three sons, Jonathan, James and Warren, they moved in 1818 to St. Johnsbury, Vermont, where relatives had previously settled. Here Sally gave birth to four more babies, George, Eliza, John and Martha. However, the babies, Eliza and John each died within a month after their births.

In this frontier land the day’s chores demanded the energy and muscle of each family member. Sally’s daily tasks began early with breakfast, care of chickens and pigs, making butter and cheese. Dinner for the family might be potatoes, nicely roasted in the ashes in the cobblestone fireplace, a bear steak or a wild partridge that was done to a turn on a rotating spit. Bread and cakes were baked in a tin oven in the oven front. Spinning and weaving were necessary to make needed clothes and household goods. She especially enjoyed and braiding rugs, and the quilting bees, making warm bedcoverings for winter’s freezing nights. Her sons worked with their father on the farm, clearing land, building fences, planting and harvesting, raising stock – and learning the coopering trade. The parents led their children in Bible reading and prayers. The boys spent a few winters in the little school house learning to read, write and cipher.

In 1832 an event happened that changed the whole course of their lives. Two young Mormon missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson, came to the area preaching that the original church of Jesus Christ had been restored, and they had power to heal the sick. Olive, the wife of Gardner’s cousin, Winslow Farr, had been ill for seven years, with no hope of recovery. Winslow asked the Elders to come to his home. After a prayer Elder Pratt took Olive’s hand, and asked her if she believed in the Lord Jesus Christ. Being too weak to speak, she nodded her head. Elder Pratt placed his hands on her head and promised that she would be healed. She was healed and made whole immediately, by her faith, and by the power of the Priesthood. There was much rejoicing for the Farr family that night. As a result of Olive’s healing and the teachings of the Elders, a number of the Farr and Snow families were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ.

The next year Gardner had received a testimony and was baptized June 16, and Sarah July 26. Sons James and Warren were baptized in the fall. In 1834 Gardner presided over the Branch of the Church in St. Johnsbury. Sarah’s name follows Gardner’s on his “Record of Names” that he kept, along with the other members of the Branch.

In 1836 Sarah and Gardner’s family with other faithful Church members, left their property, and journeyed 500 miles to gather with the Saints in Kirtland, Ohio. Here Gardner purchased several acres of land. Warren recorded that seeing Joseph Smith for the first time “was a deep spiritual experience, a feeling of joy in having the privilege of looking upon a man that had seen angels, also the Son of God.”” His soul “was filled with rapture.” They all thrilled on hearing about the glorious manifestations that had been witnessed in the Kirtland Temple! The Snows attended meetings in the Temple and listened to impressive discourses by the Elders.

Sally and Gardner each received a Patriarchal Blessing by Patriarch Joseph Smith. In her sacred and impressive blessing Sally is told, “thou must be a mother in Israel and an instrument in the hands of God in doing much good. Be faithful and thou mayest call down great blessings from Heaven…” This blessing proved to be a most precious possession to her in sustaining her faith in the great trials ahead.

As the church grew in numbers and spiritual strength, the forces working against it became more vigorous. Nearly every family lost money in the financial crash, and apostasy, persecution and mobocracy was rampant. But through it all Sally and Gardner remained firm in their loyalty to the Prophet.

There was no peace in Kirtland. On July 5, 1838 Gardner and Sally began the journey with the Kirtland Camp to Missouri. Near Dayton, Ohio, the men took a contract to build a turnpike road and a temporary encampment was made. Sally’s baby, Gardner Hastings Snow, was born in the camp August 21. When the child was eight days old the journey was resumed. Each day they heard reports of men being called up to fight the Mormons in Far West, but they paid little attention, trusting in God for protection. They arrived in Far West October 2nd and camped on the public square. Isaac Morley furnished a beef, and they were provided for as they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days. The Camp continued on to Adam-ondi-Ahman, their assigned place of settlement.

This beautiful spot was not long to be a resting place. Mobs inflamed with hatred against the Mormons were gathering in great numbers, threatening them with destruction. The very day they arrived, the mob fired upon Saints at De Witt, surrounded their town with hundreds of men. In dire straits, the Saints had to abandon their homes. The mob rushed from DeWitt to d-Ahman.

It was in the midst of this impending peril, while the men at di-Ahman were standing continuously on guard momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Sally and Gardner 00 the one who bore his name – died, and was buried, at the tender age of six weeks. Heartbroken, Gardner wrote: “Here in this place my little son Gardner H. died and was buried by my own hands by reason of mob violence being so great.” In her grief, it was comforting to remember her Blessing that she was a “mother in Israel,” and she was blessed by the Lord, and “the angels would administer unto” her. Even though they had suffered such a tribulation, she knew she had been faithful in all that had been asked of her.

Mobs were in all directions, destroying everything belonging to the Mormons, burning houses, shooting men, women and children, taking livestock, taking prisoners, and threatening death to all Mormons. The fury of the mobs increased each day, and they were determined to drive the Mormons from the state. The Governor refused protection for them. Fear was in the hearts of all the Saints.

On the same day the armed men attached at Haun’s Mill, Sally’s first grandchild, Sarah Jane, was born to Eliza Ann and James – on October 30. The mob, with blackened faces, came right into the home where the sick and weak mother and baby were alone. Eliza recognized the apostate leader, John F. Boynton, by his voice – as the former apostle – the missionary who had taught the Gospel to her Carter family in Maine. She called John F. Boynton by name, and reproached him for his apostasy from the truth he had once taught her. He slunk shamefacedly away, calling the mob off with him. To her courageous attitude, both she and the child owed their lives.

Her husband James was with the Far West militia guarding the city all night long, fearing a terrible battle in the morning. But treachery robbed the Saints of their Prophet leader, and Joseph Smith and other leading men were sentenced to be shot on the public square, and were only spared this fate as by a miracle. Instead, they were marched away in irons to a cramped, dark jail, where they languished for nearly six months. The mob continued to rob and abuse the Saints. Eliza Ann described their expulsion from Missouri:

The mob was blowing horns and firing guns all night long. We were without bread or anything to make bread of but by help of the Lord we were preserved by the Brethren giving up their arms and promising to leave Far West. We left in the month of February…(1839). There were three families to the wagon and one span of horses. We took turns walking. There was Winslow Far and wife, Gardner Snow and wife, and James C. Snow and wife. We traveled all day and at night lay down at a campfire as we had no tent. We arrived in Illinois in 1839.

Gardner’s brief but explicit words were: “In the winter of 1839, together with all the saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob.” They traveled 400 miles across Missouri through mud and rain. On crossing the Mississippi River by flatboat they arrived in Illinois, where they were treated in a friendly way. They moved to a settlement near Lima, where they pitched tents until log cabins could be built. Gardner and his sons cleared land and farmed it, and established a cooper shop.

On January 20, 1840, Sally gave another choice spirit its mortal body, Elizabeth Coolidge Sow. Elizabeth was a great joy and comfort to her parents and older brothers and sister.

A stake of the Church was organized at Lima in October under presidency of Hyrum Smith, with Isaac Morley as President, and James Snow as Clerk. Gardner was ordained Bishop of Lima Branch. He was now the leader responsible for the spiritual and temporal needs of all the members of this Branch.

Sarah and Gardner’s family circle continued to widen. James and George had married; Warren married in 1841; Martha married about 1842. And more grandchildren were arriving. A letter came from Ohio from their eldest son Jonathan, who probably never joined the Church. He told of his illness, fever, ague, abscesses, and loneliness. He wished for his mother’s care and comfort. How Sally’s heart must have ached for him! It probably was not possible to ever see him again.

On March 17, 1842 the Prophet Joseph Smith organized the Female Relief Society in Nauvoo to aid the poor, nurse the sick and afflicted, and acting under the bishop, to engage in charitable work to all who required assistance. A number of families had become impoverished through disabling illness, and the winters had been especially cold and harsh. If it had not been for the timely aid of the Relief Society, many would have suffered greatly and perished. In 1843 Sarah Snow and Sister Whiting were called to serve as counselors to President Lucy Morley in Hancock County. It was noted that in Lima in September, Sarah and her Relief Society sisters made quilts, that many would not suffer as they had last winter. The Lima organization felt much compassion, for their own sufferings were still vivid in their souls – the sharp pangs of hunger, the yearning for warm shawls and shoes as they had endured rain, mud and snow, their helplessness when the chills and fever struck their family members. The women of Lima did all they could do to alleviate the suffering of those afflicted.

Hyrum Smith of the Temple Committee appealed to the women asking them to contribute a penny a week to be used in purchasing material, particularly glass and nails, for the Temple. Sarah Snow’s signature was among the 47 of the sisters in Lima who were “Subscribers for a Penny a Week for the Nauvoo Temple, April 11, 1844.” Her daughter Martha J. Edmiston, and daughter-in-law Mary Snow also signed. They all felt deeply the need to help the work on the Temple progress, and sacrificed, and made very effort to pay this amount.

The Snow family was stunned, brokenhearted and overcome with sorrow and grief when they learned of the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum Smith. Warren related it was a dark and gloomy time – the wind blew, the thunder roared, lightening flashed and the very heavens poured forth their tears! They had been very close to the Prophet and loved him greatly. The following August Warren saw the mantle of Joseph rest upon Brigham Young, heard the voice of Joseph, and was convinced that Brigham Young was “the right channel for truth.”

Exciting and troublous times followed the martyrdom. In September 1845 mobbers set fire to shops and homes. Sally’s and Gardner’s home was looted and burned! The cow and calf, stack of oats, 200 bushels of corn, 30 bushels of potatoes, and other property were taken. The mob continued burning for an entire week until “Morley Town was in ashes.” James’ home, and Martha and John Edmistons’ blacksmith shop were burned. Later Gardner wrote: “In the fall of 1845 I was again driven by mob violence into Nauvoo suffering great loss of property with others…”

Every effort was made to complete the Temple, and Sarah and Gardner Snow received their endowments and promised blessings on December 22, 1845. They were sealed for time and all eternity 29 January 1846 at 1:20 p.m. by A. M. Lyman. Their sons and wives, and daughter Martha and John Edmiston, received their blessings also.

Everyone was preparing for the inevitable move to the West. While the men obtained wagons and oxen, the women parched corn for storage to make corn bread, made rusk breads and crackers from wheat flour. Gardner and Sally left Nauvoo with all the saints, in the spring of 1846 “by reason of hostile foes who were then preparing to come against us, and journeyed to the western part of Pottowattomie Co.” The winter of 1846-7 was a trying one, winter was cold, shelters poor, and sickness was prevalent, especially malaria and scurvy. Many young and old, weakened by the long trek, sickened and died. Sarah had many opportunities to serve others, especially since Gardner was gain called to resume his calling as Bishop.

A letter from Gardner’s sister in Vermont brought news that Sally’s eldest son, Jonathan, had died, south of Cleveland, Ohio! Again she felt the grief and loss of her beloved son.

The Snow families remained in Iowa until 1850, as some families were needed to stay and grow crops to help those arriving from the States and England. On June 15 the emigrating company of 100 was organized with Joseph Young, President, Winslow Farr, Counselor, William Snow, Captain; James McLellan and Gardner Snow, Captains of Fifty. They were generally well fitted out with wagons, teams, provisions, machinery, 4,000 sheep and 5,000 head of cattle, horses and mules. It was by faith they threaded their way up the Elkhorn and along the Platte, past Chimney Rock, and on to South Pass, down to Sweetwater to Independence Rock and finally over Big Mountain and into Salt Lake Valley.

On October 1, 1850 Elder Joseph Young – and Gardner, Sally and Elizabeth, age 10, arrived in the Valley! Great was their relief and joy! Their weary souls were lifted, and their hearts filled with thanksgiving!

By Nov. 6th, they had traveled another 130 miles south to Sanpete valley. Isaac Morley, Gardner’s valued friend, and a group had settled in Manti the year before. On their arrival Gardner was allotted a lot in the Big Field, and the first task was building a home. It was a great satisfaction for Gardner and Sally to be among dear friends and contributing their experience and talents, and meeting the challenges of building this new community.

Sarah Snow had shared years of trials, toil, exposure, and danger, along with her husband. She and other women, suffered the pangs of hunger, and the cold winter storms that searched and attacked their weakened frames. Through all their experiences, they displayed their faith, womanhood and integrity by remaining steadfast through all their privation and suffering. These women were examples of those ideals which the martyred Prophet Joseph Smith had taught of “faith, tenderness, sympathy and compassion…” These “sisters” drew closely together in Manti, and often were dependent upon their neighbor sharing the very bread of life. Most of their activities were centered around the great prayer, “Give us this day our daily bread.” These mothers and grandmothers were poor, yet they helped those in greater need, and even fed and clothed the Indians.

Although very little is recorded about Sarah (Sally) Snow, it is understood she was of inestimable influence in the lives of her children and grandchildren and exhibited great faith, love, charity, and leadership qualities among her family and friends. Gardner wrote of his bellowed Sarah: “On the 25 day of April 1855 my wife Sarah the Partner of my early youth departed this life as calmly as a Summer Morning age 60 years 2 Months and 22 days…” Her obituary stated she died of liver complaint. She was baptized in 1833, and gathered with the saints in Kirtland, Ohio in 1836; pass thro’ the persecutions in Missouri, and Illinois, enduring all her sufferings with patience and fortitude, and on Nov. 6, arrived in the city of Manti.

Sarah Snow’s faith and good works have secured to her that reward which is unfading and eternal. As her Patriarchal Blessing promised her “the Lord, thy Savior, loves thee because of the principles of virtue and integrity that are planted in thy bosom…This thy blessing shall be realized by thy posterity from generation to generation…”

Source: Valiant in the Faith – Gardner and Sarah Snow and Their Family, by Archibald F. and Ella M. Bennett, and Barbara Bennett Roach, 1990; D.U.P. History by B.B. Roach
Submitted by Barbara Bennett Roach, 6276 Oakcrest Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84121

Above taken from records from the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.
SARAH SAWYER HASTINGS SNOW

Sarah Sawyer Hastings Snow was born in 1795 to Jonathan Hastings and Saloma Burt Hastings, in Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. She was named for her maternal grandmother, Sarah Sawyer. Her father died when she was only three years old. Her mother was left with five little daughters. At the age of 19, on 30 November 1814, in Chesterfield, she married Gardner Snow, and moved to the Snow homestead in Chesterfield, where she lived until her first three sons were born. Jonathan Hastings, 25 May 1815; James Chauncey, 11 January 1817; and Warren Stone Snow, 05 June 1818,


At this time many friends and relatives had gone to homestead in Vermont. Sarah and Gardner decided to follow and traveled by ox team in a canvas-roofed wagon 125 miles, where they were reunited with loved ones. They homesteaded 100 acres, and built a sturdy house, with Gardner making all of their furniture. It was in this home that their fourth son was born, George Washington Snow, 08 September 1820. Later their first daughter arrived, Eliza Snow, 17 January 1823, but she died within a month on 15 February 1823. Another son was born, John Snow, 25 February 1825. He, too, lived less than a month and was buried next to his sister. He died 15 March 1825. Another daughter was born the same year, Martha Jane Snow, born 03 September 1827. She lived to survive childhood, along with her four older brothers.

In 1832 Cousin Erastus Snow had witnessed the miraculous healing of Winslow Farr’s wife, another cousin. She had risen from her deathbed and was baptized. Sarah and Gardner met missionaries Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson, who had taught them the Gospel. Gardner was baptized on 18 June 1832, and Sarah in July on the 26th, 1832.

Two years later Gardner was called to be Presiding Elder or Branch President. He served for two years, when the spirit of gathering now rested upon their family. In 1836 they made preparations for the 700-mile journey to Kirtland, Ohio. They had no sooner arrived than the Prophet called him on a mission, leaving Sally to get them settled. They also sent their son, James Chauncey, on a mission. Gardner took most of their money from the sale of 100 acres and invested in the Kirtland Safety Society. He purchased three acres of land in Kirtland. Sally and their sons build a cabin.

In 1837 mobs threatened to destroy their bank and take their property. The Kirtland institution failed. They lost all their money. Gardner came home from his mission, planted a crop, and the Prophet called him on another mission to Steuben County, New York. While he was gone, one Sabbath morning, armed dissenters entered the temple with pistols and knives.

Sarah, her children, and future daughter-in-law, Eliza Ann Carter, heard John Boynton threaten to blow out the brains of the first man who dared to lay hands on him. This was the same man, who, as a missionary, had baptized Eliza. John Boynton had been disfellowshipped. The women were frightened and tried to escape by jumping out of the windows. This was only one incident leading to the expulsion of the Saints. In February and March two sons were married. This was two happy events, but darkness and evil were gathering. The spirit of hatred and mobocracy became bitter, and the Prophet had to flee for his life.

On 06 March, the 70’s met and considered moving enmass to Missouri. The vote was taken – Gardner sold his land on his way home, and announced to Sarah that they were moving. On 05 July Zions Camp was organized, and Sarah again abandoned her home. They traveled until 28 July, where they found employment to build a turnpike – this required one month’s time, and they were to be paid in cash.

On 21 August Sally gave birth to Gardner’s namesake, Gardner Hastings Snow. When the baby was eight days old they resumed their journey. Their son, James and his wife, Eliza Ann, caught up with them on the trail. Each day reports reached them that the Governor had called out 5,000 men from the upper counties. Troops threatened the Saints with death if they progressed any further. When a motion was made to disband the Kirtland Camp, it was unanimously defeated.

Five miles out of Far West, the Prophet and Saints met them. They were received with open arms and fed – they were so hungry – not having eaten but little for several days. On 04 October they arrived at Adam-ondi-Ahman, which had been assigned to them as their place of settlement. They pitched their tents about sunset.

This beautiful spot was not long to be a resting place. For on the day of their arrival, the mob fired upon the Saints at DeWitt, near Far West. They surrounded their town and besieged it with hundreds of men. The mob left DeWitt and headed for Adam. They began to plunder and burn – driving the Saints out in the midst of a snowstorm. The mob drove off their animals – and forced them to flee for several miles. The men stayed to guard what was left. It was in this blinding snowstorm that Sarah held in her arms their baby son, Gardner, age six weeks, as he died. She would not let loose of his still little body until Gardner found her, and together they buried him. What horrible grief and anguish was felt by Sarah, who had tabernacled that sweet little spirit, giving birth in the wilderness just six weeks before.

Son James joined up with General Doniphan and troops to rescue his parents. They dispersed the mob. The Prophet was able to return home. They now greatly hoped for a season of peace.

October 27 Governor Boggs issued the Extermination Order. November 6 their property was seized. All men in Adam-ondi-Ahman were placed under arrest. They had ten days to vacate. They had no flocks left, no crops in, because they had just arrived in October. The women loaded their wagons with what hadn’t been carried away, and in the bitter cold they moved to Far West. Their feet were frozen, and they were welcomed into son James’ tiny cabin. In the height of these mobbings their son George decided to be baptized.

February 03 of the following year they were again required to flee the mob. This time three families shared one wagon to carry their possessions. Gardner and Sarah, son James and wife, Eliza Ann, and cousin Winslow Farr and his wife At night they law down at the campfire 0—they had no coverings for tents. The Saints arrived in Quincy where the people received them with many kindnesses. They settled in Morley’s settlement, also known as Yelrome, and began to build again, clear land, and to plant their crops. Sally gave birth to another daughter. Son George and his wife buried their child, one set of twins, the girl survived. James and Eliza had a new son. Sarah now had two new grandchildren to hold, and help heal her aching heart that still mourned for the loss of baby Gardner.

At this time Gardner was called to be Bishop and ordained by Hyrum Smith. Here peace was enjoyed for a time. At this time Sarah was called into the Relief Society Presidency. She served with Lucy Morley as President and Sister Whitig as Second Counselor. These sisters suffering was still vivid in their souls. They remembered the sharp pangs of hunger, the sickness and the cold. Sarah, along with the sisters in the branch, donated a penny a week to buy nails and glass for the temple. When they asked for a penny a week, most of the sisters gave a years worth. On the signup sheet, Sarah’s name topped the list.

On 16 June they were again forced to flee to Nauvoo for protection. Eleven days later, what happened at Carthage Jail is known to each of us (27 June 1844). All of Sally’s sons were members of the Nauvoo Legion, and armed to protect the Saints. On the 24th, however, by order of the Governor, they had to surrender their arms. Throughout all of the tumultuous times following the martyrdom the Snows remained unharmed. They were able shortly to return to their homes in Morley’s settlement.

On 10 September the mob burned their daughter’s home. The following morning they torched son James’ home. On the fourth day of burning they looted and burned Sarah and Gardner’s home. The burnings continued for a week and the whole family fled to their son Warren’s home. The mob burned them out there, too, as well as thousands of bushels of wheat and other grain. They gave them ten minutes to get out – then after they carried away what little belongings they could – the mob stole whatever they wanted. They were rescued by Orrin Porter Rockwell, and his 160 men, among whom was their son Warren, and cousin Erastus.

Tempered, and further tried, they found a temporary home with relatives and friends in Nauvoo, where Gardner did carpentry work on the interior of the temple. They were sealed on 29 January 1846 by Amasa M. Lyman. On 06 October the General Conference voted unanimously to move to the Rocky Mountains. It was indeed a struggle to obtain the outfit recommended. On 29 June 1846 both Gardner and Sarah received Patriarchal Blessings from Patriarch Isaac Morley.

In February the Exodus began. Two more grandchildren died. The women walked, rain or shine, until arrival at Winter Quarters. Twenty-two Bishops were called, Gardner being one of them. This was a sad time, for outside of Winter Quarters were 300 graves. One was their daughter-in-law’s, which resulted in Sarah raising two more grandchildren.

Brigham Young assigned Gardner to plant crops at Council Bluffs to prepare for the Saints coming from England. The “Captain Gardner Snow Company” left for the valley on 12 June 1850. They brought two carding machines, 400 sheep, and 500 head of cattle, horses and mules. They entered the valley on 01 October 1850, met by brass bands, relatives and friends who administered to their needs.

Gardner and Sarah rested until 06 November 1850 when they were called to go south to Sanpete County and colonize Manti, thus began another 130-mile journey. This time, however, Sarah got a home made of adobe brick, which she lived in for four years before she passed away at the age of 60. The home is still standing, as is her heritage to her posterity – faith, love, charity and leadership.

Sarah died in Manti City, Utah, on 25 April 1855. The Deseret News obituary reads: “Died in Manti City April 25, 1855, of liver complaint. Sarah S., wife of Gardner Snow, age 60 years and two months. She was baptized in June 1833, and gathered with the Saints to Kirtland, Ohio, in 1836, passed through the persecution in Missouri and Illinois, enduring all her sufferings with patience and fortitude; and on November 6, 1850, arrived in the City of Manti.

Sources: Lima Branch records, CHP, Bk. 210,p354; Patriarchal Blessings, CHP, 124: 14-15; Morley Settlement Affidavits Church Historians Department P 46 & 54. Also the Nauvoo Temple Endowment Register, p 110, Gen. Soc. & “Valiant in the Faith Gardner & Sarah Snow & Their Family,” by Archibald Bennett, p 103 & 104, History of Relief Soc. 1842-1866, p. 61, 62, 24, 101; Kate B. Carter Hearth Throbs of the West 8 : 224, 1850 Census of Iowa Pottawattamie District.


By her 3rd Great Granddaughter, Katherine Anne Thatcher Brimhall
Submitted to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Katherine T. Brimhall, 531 West 100 South, Provo, Utah 84601 on March 30, 2001.

THE LIFE OF SARAH SAWYER HAS'LINGS SNOW

Sarah Sawyer Hastings was the long and formal name given to the first daughter of Jonathan and Salome Burt Hastings. She was born February 2, 1795 in, Chesterfield, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Sarah, a Hebrew name from the Old Testament meaning
"Princess," was a favorite among her relatives. Sarah Sawyer, for whom our Sarah was named, was her maternal grandmother. However, she was known most of her life by "Sally." The Chesterfield, New Hampshire records, gives her name as Sally, a1ong with the information about her family. Her father Jonathan Hastings was born 26 April 1769 at Chesterfield, New Hampshire. Her mother Salome Burt, was born about 1771, probably at Westmoreland, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. Her older brothers
were Wilder, born 20 September 1790; Oliver, born 31 December 1791; Lybeus, born 23 June 1793; and younger sister, Orpha, was born 4 September 1797, all at Chesterfield.

Sally's father died when she was just three years old - a great tragedy for his young widow and five little children. A record quoted in "The Connecticut Magazine," states his death occurred "13 August 1798. Jonathan Hastings (son of Lieut. Josiah Hastings of Chesterfie New Hampshire) buried, aged 29 years," in the Cemter Church Burying Ground at Hartford, Connecticut. No further details of his death have been found.

Both of Sally's grandfathers, Josiah Hastings and Enos Burt were Revolutionary War soldiers. Joshia Hastings was a "Soldier of 1775, '77". He was in Chesterfield in 1770 and settled near the river in the southwest quarter of the town, on what was known as the "Hastings farm." Enos Burt was one of the signers of the Articles of Association, 12 June 1776. He had land in Westmoreland in 1772, and was living there in 1790. About 1793 he must have moved to New York, and he died in Herkimer, New York in TS36. Among Sally's forefathers were notable, leadjng citizens in numerous
communities in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Chesterfield, New Hampshire where SaIl y grew up was a picturesque town amid hills and meadows along the brooks. The fishing and hunting helped supply the families with excellent food, in addition to beans, corn, rye bread, potatoes, pumpkins, milk. Pioneer life there, though, was a constant struggle against ant, cold and wild beasts.

In her youth Sally became a favorite companion of Gardner Snow of West Chesterfield, whose family owned the saw and grist mills. They went to the barn raisings, husking bees, and the dancing parties. The gentleman and lady usually rode to the ball on the same horse, the lady on a light saddle behind her companion. The date recorded for thelr marriage was November 30, 1814. At the "old meeting house in Centre village," Gardner, age 22, led his bride, age 19 up the broad aisle to the front of the pulpit, walking between the rows of square pews, and they were pronounced "man and wife."

Gardner, the son of James and Abigail Farr Snow, learned and practiced the important trade of coopering, and made buckets, pails, churns, tubs, barrels, water-tight containers to hold liquids, produce, ashes, starch, potash, as well as soap and sugar.

Sally and Gardner lived in Chesterfield until after the births of three sons, Jonathan Hastings, born 25 May 1815, James Chauncey, January 11,1817, and Warren stone, 15 June 1818. Gardner's father, uncles, and other relatives moved from Chesterfield after 1804 for cheaper land to farm in northern Vermont. The reports of
pioneering there were so inviting that Gardner and Sally left the old "Snow homestead" in 1818. They made a toilsome northward journey along the Connecticut River of over 125 miles, probably traveling by ox team and canvas-roofed wagon. It was a time of rejoicing when this young couple, with two little boys and baby
arrived in St. Johnsbury, and were reunited with Gardner's family.

Their new home was charmingly located at the junction of two rivers, surrounded by hills and knolls, plateaus and winding water courses. Gardner began the task of clearing land of brush and trees, and plowed, planted and cultivated the shallow, rocky soil. A house and barn needed to be built before the severe winter snows came. Probably Sally's house was of rough boards, roofed with long split shingles. Inside, was the deep-bellied fireplaqe with blazing logs and pendant pots and kettles. The gun and powder horns, were hung above. Strings of dried pumpkin or apples dangled overhead. Gardner used his carpentry skills to make their table, chairs, and other furniture. In one corner of the room was aspinning wheel and a loom for Sally to make all the clothing and household goods for her family.

Sally gave birth to four more babies: George Washington, September 8, 1820; Eliza, January 17, 1823, who died within a month; John, 25 February 1825, died March 15th, and was buried beside his sister. Martha Jane's birth was September 3, 1827, and
with her older brothers, survived the perils of childhood.

In this frontier land, the day's chores demanded the energy and muscle of each family member. The sons worked alongside their father clearing land and farming, raising stock, haying, harvesting. Sally's daily tasks began early with breakfast, care of chickens and pigs, making butter and cheese. Dinner for the family might be potatoes, nicely roasted in the ashes in the cobblestone fireplace, a bear steak or a wild partridge that was done to a turn on a rotating spit. She baked bread and cakes in a tin oven in the oven front. Sally was kept busy sewing, spinning and weaving clothes and household goods, making warm quilts, and braiding rugs.

The parents led their children in Bible reading and prayers. The boys spent a few winters in the little school house. They sat on rough hewn benches as they learned to read, write and cipher.

It was in 1832 that a great change came to the Snow family. Two young Mormon missionaries, Orson Pratt and Lyman Johnson, came to the area preaching that the original church of Jesus Christ had been restored, and they had power to heal the sick. Olive, the wife of Gardner's cousin, Winslow Farr, had been ill for seven years, with no hope of recovery. Winslow asked the Elders to come to his home. After a prayer Elder Pratt approached her bed, took her hand, and asked her if she believed in the Lord Jesus Christ. Being too weak to speak, she nodded her head in the affirmative. Elder Pratt placed his hands on her head and promised that she would be healed. She was healed and made whole in the twinkling of an eye. She raised herself, sat on the bed, dressed herself, walked the room and sang praises to God. It caused such rejoicing in the family that there was no sleep that night.

This miracle of healing created a great stir among the townspeople, and a number of the Farr and Snow families were soon also converted to the Church of Jesus Christ.

When the missionaries returned the next year, Gardner who by then, had received a testimony that Jesus Christ's Gospel had been restored, was baptised June 16, 1833. On July 26th Sally was also baptised by immersion, as the Savior had taught. Through their study of the Bible and the new scripture, the Book of Mormon, James and Warren were also convinced, and James was baptised in October and Warren in November. Warren told of receiving a powerful witness, that a voice whispered in his ear, "This is the Gospel of the Son of God. Walk ye in it..."

A branch of the Church was organizes in St. Johnsbury in 1833 and Gardner was called to preside over it. Gardner listed the names of the members in his little book. He served as a missonary in northern Vermont,at times going with his young cousin Erastus Snow. James and Warren also went out teaching the word of God to others in surrounding areas.

In 1836 Gardner and his family felt the spirit of gathering with other members of this Church, and prepared to sell their farm and journey 500 miles to Kirtland, Ohio. Before leaving in June, it was reported that one woman, probably Sally, stopped at the East Village graveyard to visit her babies' graves before they left the place forever.

They arrived in Kirtland that summer, amd Gardner purchased several acres of land. Warren recorded seeing the Prophet Joseph Smith for the first time was a deep spiritual experience, a feeling of joy in having the privilege of looking upon a man that had seen angels, also the Son of God. His soul "was filled with rapture." The Snow family thrilled on hearing about the glorious manifestations that had been witnessed in the Kirtland Temple! During this period James was laboring diligently as a missionary in the New England States, where he baptized many.

The Snows attended meetings in the Temple and listened to impressive discourses by the Elders. Sally and Gardner each received a blessing under the hands of Joseph Smith Sr. Sally's mentioned: "thou must be a mother in Israel, and an instrument in the hands of God in doing much good...Be faithful and thou mayest call down great blessings from Heaven..." This blessing proved to be a most precious possession to her in sustaining her faith in the great trials ahead.

When the 1837 disastrous financial panic swept over the country, nearly every family in Kirtland lost money in the financial crash, and apostasy, persecution and mobocracy was rampant. But through it all Sally and Gardner remained firm in their loyalty to the Prophet. The spirit of hatred and mobocracy became so bitter that Brigham Young and the Prophet were forced to flee to Missouri, and most of the Saints followed them.

James married Eliza Ann Carter in February 1838, and soon after, with her brother, William F. Carter, set out from Kirtland to go to MissOuri. They drove an ox team, and had some trying experiences.

Gardner, Sally, Martha, and George and his wife, Mary, joined with the Kirtland camp of 529 persons, July 5, 1838, and leaving their homes behind, traveled some miles each day toward Missouri. Near Dayton, Ohio, the men took a contract to build a road. In this temporary camp, Sally gave birth to a baby on August 21. He was named Gardner Hastings Snow, after his father. The long journey of 900 miles was resumed the next week, and continued until they reached Far West on October 2nd. They were met by Joseph and Hyrum Smith and Sidney Rigdon, and they encamped on the public square round the foundation of the Temple. Isaac Morley furnished a beef, and they provided for "like men of old, for they were hungry, having eaten but little for several days." The Camp continued on the 3rd to Adam-ondi-Ahman, their assigned place of settlement.

This beautiftll spot was not long to b e a resting place. Mobs inflamed with hatred agaist the Mormons were gathered in great numbers, threatending them with destruction. On the very day they arrived, the mob fired upon Saints at De Witt, near Far West, surrounded their town, and beseiged it with hundreds of men. In dire straits, the Saints had to abandon their homes. The mob rushed from DeWitt to di-Ahman.

It was in the midst of this impending peril, while the men at di-Ahman were standing continuouisly on guard momentarily expecting attack, that the baby son of Sally and Gardner, the one who bore his name - died, and was buried, at the tender age of six weeks. Heart-broken, Gardner wrote: "Here in this place my little son Gardner H. died and was buried by my own hands by reason of mob violence being so great." Grief-stricken, Sally turned to her Kirtland blessing to find an answer to such a trial. She received some consolation that she was "a mother in Israel," that she was blessed by the Lord, and if she asked "the angels would administer unto" her. Even though they had suffered such a tribuation, she knew they had been faithful in all that had been asked of them.

Mobs were in all directions, destroying everything belonging to the Mormons, burning houses, shooting men, women and children,scattering and taking livestock, taking prisoners, and threatening death to all Mormons. The fury of the mobs increased each day, and they were determined to drive the Mormons from the state, or force them to deny their religion. The Governor refused protection for them. Fear was in the hearts of all the Saints.

On the same day the armed men attacked at Haun's Mill, another large mob was approaching Far West. There, in an old log house that they could "poke a cat out between the logs" Sally's first grandchild, Sarah Jane, was born to Eliza Ann and James, on October 30. James was forced to be away after the birth to be with the
other men building a fortification to protect the city from attack. The mid-wife had not stayed long enough to dress the baby as she had children of her own to protect. The mob came right into the home where the sick and weak mother and baby were left alone. Eliza recognized the apostate leader as John F. Boynton, the former apostle, and the missionary who had taught the Gospel to Eliza's family, the Carters, in Maine.

"Madam, how old is your baby?" they demanded.
"Reckon it for yourself,"the intrepid mother retorted.

She called John F. Boynton by name, and reproached him for his apostacy from the truth he had once taught her. He, slunk shamefacedly away, calling the mob off with him. To her courageous attitude, both she and the child owend their lives.

The Far West militia guarded the city all night long, fearing a terrible battle in the morning. But treachery robbed the Saints of their Prophet leader, and Joseph Smith and other leading men were sentenced to be shot on the public square, and were only spared this fate as by a miracle. Instead they were marched away in irons to a cramped, dark jail, where they languished for nearly six months.

Meanwhile the mob went into Far West, robbed and abused the Saints, plundered their homes, wasted and destroyed property and possessions. The brethren were forced to give up their arms and sign away their property. There was only one thing left to do - to move out of the state. There were 15,000 destitute Saints, with no money, livestock, or sufficient clothing. Eliza Ann described their expulsion:

"The mob was blowing horns and firing guns all night long. We were without bread or anything to make bread of but by help of the Lord we were preserved by the Brethern giving up their arms and promising to leave Far West. We left in the month of February of the following year (1839). There were three families to the wagon and one span of horses. We took turns walking. There was Winslow Farr and wife, Gardner Snow and wife and James C. Snow and wife. We travelled all day and at night lay down at a campfire as we had no tent. We arrived in Illinois In 1839.

Gardner's brief but explicit words were: "In the winter of 1839, together with all the saints I moved with my family to Illinois to escape the wrath of an ungodly mob."

They traveled 400 miles across Missouri through mud and rain, and the last six miles their feet would sink in over their ankles at every step. On crossing the Mississippi River by flatboat they arrived in Illinois, where they were treated in a friendly way.

They moved on to a settlement near Lima, where they pitched tents until log cabins could be built. Gardner and his sons cleared land and farmed it, and established their own cooper shop. On January 20, 1840, Sally gave another choice spirit its mortal body, Elizabeth Coolidge Snow. Elizabeth was a great joy and comfort to her parents and older brothers and sister.

A stake of the Church was organized at Lima Oct. 22, 1840 under the presidency of Hyrum Smith, with Isaac Morley as President, and James as Clerk. The next day Gardner Snow was ordained Bishop of the Lima Branch under the hands of Hyrum Smith.
He was now the leader responsible for the spiritual and temporal needs of all the members of this Branch.

Their family ties were close, and the circle was enlarged with marriages of their children and more grandchildren. A letter came from their eldest son, Jonathan, from Ohio, who probably never joined the Church. He told of his illness of fever and abcesses. How Sally must have yearned to go to him to care for him and give him comfort in his illness. He said he hoped he could come in the fall, but there is no indication that she ever saw him again.

The Prophet Joseph Smith organized the Female Relief Society on March 17, 1842 in Nauvoo, to aid the poor, nurse the sicK and afflicted, and acting under the bishop, to engage in charitable work to all who required assistance. He gave the sisters this important instruction: "Said Jesus, Ye shall do the work which ye see me do." In Lima, Lucy Morley was President with Sarah Hastings Snow, and Sister Whiting as counselors. There were many opportunities to serve as a number of Saints were extremely poor because of the sufferings and persecutions experienced in Missouri from hardship and exposure and losing all their possessions. Many suffered the ague, or exhausting chills and intense fever, and if it had not been for the timely aid of the Female Relief Society, would have suffered greatly and perished. In September 1843 it was proposed in Nauvoo that the sisters get together materials for bedding, that many might not suffer as they had done the year before. The Minutes show that "in Lima the sisters were now at work making quilts for this society." Sarah and her "daughters" and other ladies hurried through their home chores to participate in quilting bees, cutting scraps of fabric, piecing them together, and quilting the warm coverlets for the use of those in need. These sisters felt much compassion because of their own experiences of unjust suffering.

The sisters opened their hearts and offered generously of their time and substance to help forward the Nauvoo Temple. Some so11citated materials, collected wool, sewed and repaired clothes, wove cloth and knit sweaters and socks, for the workmen on the
Temple. They gave milk, soap, flax, tow, thread, cotton yardage, and cared for the sick, giving every possdble assistance.

In 1844 the novel pIan of saving a penny a week for the Temple was adopted. This "Penny Fund" was instituted by Hyrum Smith and promoted by his wife and her sister. Hyrum appealed to the women asking them to contribute one cent apiece a week, for purchasing material, particularly glass and nails, for the "Temple. "There was great anxiety manifest among the sisters to pay their portion, and nearly all paid a year's subscription in advance." Sarah Snow and 47 of her associates in Lima, signed, and contributed their pennies for the glass and nails on the Nauvoo Temple.

Sally and her associates might have experienced the same feelings as one woman expressed. After the martyrdom of the Prophet and Hyrum, they all struggled hard to bear their great bereavement and not "suffer our lips to curse our enemies." Their "hands and hearts were employed to hasten the completion of the Temple. The sisters even resolved to pay fifty cents each towards buying nails and glass. By the utmost sacrifice, she scraped together the amount and then, en route to the temple office, was assailed by the long list of things her family needed. But she resisted this temptation and firmly resolved, "if I have no more than a crust of bread each day for a week, I will pay this money into the treasury..." The Prophet's sacrifice of his life increased her own devotion.

Angry mobs began commencing brutal attacks on the Saints at Morleys Settlement, threatening them with extermination if they didn't: 1. Deny Joseph Smith as a Prophet of God and join the mob in securing his arrest; 2. Gather up their effects and move to Nauvoo; Or 3. Give up their arms and remain quiet until the affair was over. Because of threats and mobs gathering in the neighborhood the Snows and other familys were obliged to leave their homes to save their lives and go to Nauvoo for protection.

The outcast families were in Nauvoo when the shot-torn bodies of the martyred Prophet and Patriarch were borne in sad procession. They were overcome with sorrow and grief!

When the situation became more peaceful after the martyrdom, the group returned to their homes. For a while the surroundings were quiet. Then, the anger of the mob was rekinled with the new leadership of the Church, growth and prosperity. Mobocracy, destruction and murder was revived, especially in outlying areas.

In September 1845 another terrible putbreak of hostilities occurred at Morley. A violent mob came upon the settlement, and for eight days and nights fired upon the settlers - burned 70 to 80 homes, shops and bui1dings, a11 their stacks of grain. The Saints were forced out into the cold night during a drenching rain, and the old, children and sick suffered so bad1y that some deaths occurred.

Sally's beloved home was looted and burned. Their grain and property - Gardner's coopering tools and materials - were burned and wantonly destroyed. Their daughter Martha's house and her husband, John Edmiston's, blacksmith shop was also burned. Warren and Mary Ann's home was fired. Eliza Ann told of their "house being burned down by a wicked mob painted black" and being forced to leave and go to Nauvoo. These malicious burn-outs left the Snows destitute.

When word of the burnings reached Brigham Young he advised the leaders to abandon their homes and possessions to the mob and come to Nauvoo. Teams were sent from Nauvoo to assist in bringing them in. Gardner wrote of this outrage, "In the fall of 1845 I was again driven by mob violence into Nauvoo suffering great loss of property with others ..."

A few months after this terrible persecution, the Saints saw the symbol of all their sacrifices, as the gleaming Temple was being rushed to completion. Soon after the first endowment work began in December, Sally and Gardner received their blessings from on High on the 22nd. They were sealed for time and all eternity on January 29, 1846. James, Warren, George, and Martha Jane and their companions were each endowed by February 6th. The Temple was their symbol of dedication to the Lord.

As persecution continued yhe Saints hastened preparations to make the long trek to a refuge in the west. Gardner and Sally left Nauvoo in the spring of the year, "in common with all the saints by reason of hostile foes who were then preparing to come against us and journeyed to the western part of Pottawattomie County, State of Iowa and a place known as Council Bluffs and at a settlement made by the Saints called Cartersville."

Sally and other sisters walked all day through mud and snow, and at night, forgetful of their own fatigue prepared suppers for their families. They fixed up and dealt out the alloted portion of food to cheer the hearts of their homeless family, always with a fervent prayer that their lives might be preserved. But through their trials they felt contented and happy. Their songs resounded from tent to tent and wagon to wagon. Captain Pitt's brass band accompanied them and music, dancing and singing caused them to forget their woes and look with hope toward the future. They knew
they were doing the will of their Heavenly Father, relying upon His word and promises; and having His blessing upon them.

At each encampment they stopped to clear, fence, plow and plant the ground for those pioneers to follow. While at Mt. Pisgah, Gardner Edmiston their three year old grandson, died and was buried. They all felt deeply saddened in this trial.

Brigham Young deemed it wise to hold the lands in Pottawatomie country in Iowa for the continued migration of the Saints. Gardner and Sally lived there for four years, and their sons James and Warren stayed six years. Gardner was called again to be Bishop. The Bishop's report of the families in Carterville for October 1848 showed an abundant harvest of wheat, corn, buckwheat, potatoes, and fall wheat.

The main body of the Church was on the plains. When the pioneer party to Great Salt Lake returned in October, 1847, there was much rejoicing, and Cousin Erastus told of his experiences to the Snow families. In December Brigham Young was sustained as President of the Church. After a post office was established, a letter from Gardner's sister brought news of his family in Vermont, and that his father was still alive. It also mentioned that Sally's eldest son, Jonathan, had died in Ohio.

In 1850 Gardner, Sally and Elizabeth, now 10, made preparations to go west, even though it meant leaving their children 14 grandchildren, four of which had been born on the Iowa plains.

The trek began June 15th with Gardner as Captain of the 2nd 50 of William Snow's 100 under the direction of Joseph Young. His account book listed each ten, with two wagons, 11 cattle, 10 persons, 1 gun, powder and lead. They traveled over the plains slowly, ferried wagons over rivers and swam the horses. There were difficult places for stock and teams to cross, and feed for cows and stock was hard to find. On August 28 at the upper Platte Gardner sent a message to the First Presidency asking assistance as they were short of wagons, with 20 cattle crippled, to send 12 to 16 yoke of oxen and two wagons.

On October 1st they arrived in the valley, happy their long journey was over, "striking hands" and rejoicing together.

A month later, Gardner and Sally were settlers in Sanpete Valley in Utah, joining with their dear friend, Isaac Morley and families who had come the year before to colonize their. Garnder soon a leader in the church and community, was elected a Selectman, Alderman, and County Commissioner.

A festival in December to commemorate the arrival of the Manti pioneers brought much excitement. The people assembled at the school house, organized an infantry, raised a liberty pole. The deafening roar of artillery and loud huzzahs reechoed back from the mountains - and the celebration continued.

Sally and Gardner rejoiced when their sons and daughter arrived in 1852. Warren and Mary Ann, George and Mary, and Martha Jane and John Edmiston, and their children came to Manti. James, Eliza Ann and their children went to Provo to live.

Every man was a minute man and had guard duty. The drum major beat the drums for roll call or sounded an alarm when a call for defense was necessary. When George Snow arrived in Manti he was the drum major sounding the alarm. The men built a fort, and houses were built inside the fort for protection from the Indians. During the next few years it was an unending struggle against the Indians, the inclement weather and scarcity of food and supplies. The dreaded Walker War began in July 1853. The lives of many settlers were lost, stock was stolen and settlements destroyed.
The treaty of peace was finally signed by Chief Walker in May 1854.

Sally was among the brave women of Manti who shared in the toil and exposure to the cold winter storms, which searched their weakened frames. They suffered the pangs of hunger, enduring without murmuring. They displayed faith and integrity by remaining steadfast through all their privations and suffering. These women were examples of those ideals which the martyred Prophet Joseph Smith had taught and which had been inculcated in them in Nauvoo. The women were drawn closely together, and often were dependent upon a neighbor's spirit of sharing for the very bread of life. Around that great prayer, "Give us this day our daily bread," was centered most of their activities.

Although very little is recorded about Sally Snow, it is understood she was of inestimable influence in the lives of her children and grandchildren, and exhibited great faith, love, charity and leadership qualities among her family and friends.

On April 25, 1855 Sally's mortal experience came to an end, and she was now at rest. Her obituary in the Deseret News stated she died of liver complaint April 25, age 60 years and 2 months. It furthe read: She "gathered with the saints to Kirtland, Ohio in 1836; passeed thro' the persecutions in Missourl, and Illinois, enduring all her sufferings with patience and fortitude; and on Nov. 6, 1850, arrived in the city of Manti."

Sarah (Sally) H. Snow'a faith and good works have secured to her that reward which is unfading, and eternal. She had the great assurance promised her in her Patriarchal Blessing - that she was a companion and a blessing to her husband...that the Lord, our Saviour, loved her because of the principles of virtue and integrity that were planted in her bosom..." She had had the blessing to judge in wisdom, and council in righteousness, to magnify the office and calling she had been called. "This thy blessing shall be realized by thy (her) posterity from generation to generation..." May her example be a beacon light to us to strive for that same exaltation, no matter what the temptations of life may be.

Gardner later wrote in his record that "after the departure of my first wife I took Caroline M.N. Tweedy, Ann M. Hansen, Johanah A. Iverson and Caroline Iverson as my wives according to the Patriarchal Order of the Kingdom of God." Gardner Snow served continually in the Sanpete community. When Sanpete County was organized he was elected a County Commissioner, and served in that capacity until elected Probate Judge. He was ordained a Patriarch at President Young's office under the hands of the First Presidency of the Church, July 9, 1874. His long and useful life closed, Nov. 17, 1889, at the age of nearly 97 years at Manti. "In every fiery test of faith, Gardner Snow emerged triumphantly."

Daughters of Utah Pioneers

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