Thursday, April 19, 2012

MARGERY VENABLES (MAINWARING) 1369-1459

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Sarah Sawyer Hastings (Snow), daughter of Jonathan Hastings, son of Mary Hartwell (Hastings), daughter of Jonathan Hartwell, son of Elizabeth Wright (Hartwell), daughter of Elizabeth Mellows (Wright), daughter of Oliver Mellowes, son of Martha Bulkeley (Mellowes), daughter of Edward Bulkeley, son of Elizabeth Grosvenor (Bulkeley), daughter of Anne Charlton (Grosvenor), daughter of Anne Mainwaring (Charlton), daughter of William Mainwaring, son of Margery Venables (Mainwaring).]

[Ancestral Link: Harold William Miller, son of Edward Emerson Miller, son of Anna Hull (Miller), daughter of William Hull, son of Anna Hyde (Hull), daughter of Uriah Hyde, son of Elizabeth Leffingwell (Hyde), daughter of Sarah Abell (Leffingwell), daughter of Joshua Abell, son of Robert Abell, son of Frances Cotton (Abell), daughter of Mary Mainwaring (Cotton), daughter of Arthur Mainwairing, son of Richard Mainwaring, son of John Mainwaring, son of Thomas Mainwaring, son of William Mainwaring, son of Margery Venables (Mainwaring).]

[Ancestral Link: Harold William Miller, son of Edward Emerson Miller, son of Anna Hull (Miller), daughter of William Hull, son of Anna Hyde (Hull), daughter of Uriah Hyde, son of Elizabeth Leffingwell (Hyde), daughter of Sarah Abell (Leffingwell), daughter of Joshua Abell, son of Robert Abell, son of Frances Cotton (Abell), daughter of Richard Cotton, son of George Cotton, son of Cicely Mainwaring (Cotton), daughter of Thomas Mainwaring, son of William Mainwaring, son of Margery Venables (Mainwaring).]

ALSO FOUND ON STAGGE-PARKER.BLOGSPOT.COM
Margery Venables - 1369
http://histfam.familysearch.org/getperson.php?personID=I41774&tree=Dodge

Margery Venables[ 1, 2]
Cal 1369 - 1459
Birth Cal 1369 Gender Female Died 1459 [3]
Person ID I41774
Europe: Royal and Noble Houses (predominantly England and France)
Father Hugh de Venables, baron of Kinderton, born about 1330, of, Kinderton, Cheshire, England, died 1379/1380, of, Kinderton, Cheshire, England
Mother Margery Cotton, died date unknown
Family ID F19713 Group Sheet
Family 1 Richard de Bulkley, born 22 February 1369, of, Cheadle, Cheshire, England, died 11 November 1391 Married 11 November 1387 [3] Children 1. Margery Bulkeley, born Cal 1389, died date unknown
Family 2 Randle Mainwaring, born about 1363, of, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died 1456, Over Peover, Cheshire, England Married 1393 [4] Children
1. Sir John Mainwaring, born about 1394, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died September 1480
2. Cicely Mainwaring, born about 1396, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died Yes, date unknown
3. Margaret Mainwaring, born about 1398, died Yes, date unknown
4. Randle Mainwaring, born about 1400, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died Yes, date unknown
5. Elizabeth Mainwaring, born about 1402, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died Yes, date unknown
6. Joan Mainwaring, born about 1406, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died Yes, date unknown
7. Ellen Mainwaring, died 25 February 1480-1481
8. William Mainwaring, born about 1410, of, Over Peover, Cheshire, England, died 1499, of, Ightfield, Shropshire, England
9. Agnes Mainwaring, died Yes, date unknown

Notes AFN: Alternate> 18GW-LN0.
BIRTH: Calculate year and aged 90 in 1459.

Sources [S3358] #798 The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, Watney, Vernon James, (4 volumes. Oxford: John Johnson, 1928), FHL book Q 929.242 W159w; FHL microfilm 1696491 it., vol. 1 p. 152, vol. 2 p. 525, vol. 3 p. 792.

[ S582] #1843 The Visitation of Shropshire, Taken in the Year 1623 (1889), Treswell, Robert (main author), (Publications of the Harleian Society: Visitations, volumes 28, 29. London: [Harleian Society], 1889), FHL book 942 B4h volumes 28-29; FHL microfilm 162,., vol. 29 pt. 2 p. 348.

[ S3358] #798 The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, Watney, Vernon James, (4 volumes. Oxford: John Johnson, 1928), FHL book Q 929.242 W159w; FHL microfilm 1696491 it., vol. 1 p. 152.

[ S3145] #7319 The Mainwaring Family, Finley, R. Mainwaring, (London, Griffith, Farran, Okeden and Welsh, Newberry House, Charing Cross Road and Sydney. Facsimile reprint 1976 The Research Publication Company, 52 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London), FHL Book 929.242 M285f., p. 31.
from ancestry.com

Middlewich
There has been a church on this site since the middle of the 12th century. The only evidence remaining from this period are four pillars in the nave. The chancel and most of the nave were rebuilt in the 14th century. The tower, the Lady Chapel at the East end of the South aisle were added in the 15th century and the Kinderton Chapel, also known as the Bostock Chapel, was built in the 16th century. Gilbert de Venables was the first Baron Kinderton, holding his land under Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester in the reign of William I. The oldest monument in the church is a brass plaque dating from 1591 which commemorates Elizabeth Venables, the wife of the then Baron of Kinderton. The chancel roof was provided by Sir William Brereton of nearby Brereton Hall in 1621. There are stained glass windows in the South Wall commemorating members of the Vaudrey family.

The church was at the centre of a Civil War skirmish in 1643. Colonel Sir Thomas Aston and Royalist forces took refuge in the church tower but the town was later captured by Sir William Brereton of Handforth, the Parliamentary commander. His relative, Sir William Brereton of Brereton was a Royalist. The church was damaged by cannon fire. At the time of the action, Sir Edward Mosley was captured. He had estates at Rolleston in Staffordshire and in Manchester. He had been made a baronet in 1640. He was released on condition that he took no further part in the war. His estates were sequestered and recovered on payment of £4,874. In other payments and loans he provided the Royalists with about £20,000. He died aged 41 in 1657 and is buried at Didsbury in the Mosley Chapel.

In 1809 the roof of the nave of the church at Middlewich was destroyed. It was replaced at the time but in the late 19th century was replaced again with an oak roof. There was a major restoration in the period 1857-8 during which alterations were made to the north aisle and Kinderton Chapel. The whitewash covered plaster on the interior walls was removed and the exterior walls were refaced.

In Lewins Street is the Victoria Technical Schools and Free Library in red brick and terracotta. It was provided for the town in 1897 by the Brunner family whose enterprise, Brunner Mond, became one of the founding firms of ICI in 1929. It has a series of tableaux showing the youth of Middlewich in 1897 studying arts, science and technology overlooked by an owl representing wisdom.
Sources:
St. Michael and All Angels Parish Church, Middlewich, A Brief History and Guide to the Architecture. Pamphlet available in the church, anonymous, price 40 pence in 2001
County Families of Lancashire and Cheshire, by James Croston, M.A., published by John Heywood, Manchester and London, 1887.

Cheshire Antiquities
© Craig Thornber, Cheshire, England, UK. Main Site Address: http://www.thornber.net/
from ancestry.com
 
SOME ADDED NOTES AND SOURCESGeorge Ormerod's The History of County Palatine and City of Chester, Vol III, pg. 199. called the only daughter of Hugh de Cotton, and sister of Hugh de Coton of Rudheth, and a widow by 11 Richard II (1398)

~Boyer's Ancestors of Robert Abell, pg. 255, calls her Sir Hugh Venerable's second wife. The line continues with the children of Margery de Cotton.

Margery Venables, daughter of Sir Hugh Venables of Kinderton, Sheriff of Cheshire and Margery Cotton Baroness Kinderton, in 1392-1393 in Chestershire, England. Margey married Randel Mainwaring in 1391, in Kinderton, Cheshire, England.
from ancestry.com

Marriage to Randle Mainwaring
Randle Mainwaring, son of William and Elizabeth was born abt. 1367 in Over-Peover, Cheshire, England. He married Margery Venables in 1391, the daughter of Hugh and Margery Cotton. He succeeded to the family estates after the death of his brother John, entered the service of King henry IV, and, as a result of an attachment to the court of the Earl of Chester, was in 1405 granted for life the office of Equitator of the Forest of Mara and Mondrem, which tne included much of the Hundred of Nantwich and all of Edisbury. Then, when the Earl succeeded as King Henry V, Randle was granted two parts of the serjeanty of Macclesfield during the minority of John Davenport, whose family held the hereditary serjeanty. Randle died in 1456.

Source: Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell
from ancestry.com

Brass Screen used by the Venables in St Michaels and All the Angels Church, Middlewich
This is a photo of the screen that was used by the Veneables during services. One of the oldest monuments in the church is a brass screen dated 1591 in memory of Elizabeth Venables, wife of Baron Kinderton. A Jacobean screen with the carved arms of the Venables family was originally at the entrance to the Kinderton chapel but is now inside the tower. source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Michael_and_All_Angels,_Middlewich
from ancestry.com
St Michaels and All the Angels Church

Poor Box in St Michaels and All the Angels Church


Astbury Church
In the churchyard are 51 gravestones dating from the 17th century.[1] The most important monument is the canopied tomb of a member of the Venables family which dates from the late 13th century and which was formerly inside the church. It contains two figures, male and female, with their hands clasped in prayer. On the canopy are crocketed pinnacles which date from the 17th century. It is listed Grade II*[15] and is the only one of its kind in Cheshire.[1] Four other structures around the church are listed as Grade II. These are tombstones with weathered effigies to the north and to the south of the Venables tomb,[16] [17] an 18th century octagonal pillar standing on a two steps which were formerly the base of a cross dating from the 16th century,[18] and the yellow sandstone gateway to the churchyard dating from the 17th century which consists of an arch with crocketed pinnacles.[19] A yew tree in the churchyard is believed to be over 1,000 years old.[20] Saxon church was on the site at the time of the Domesday Book and it was replaced by a Norman church. It was originally the mother church of Congleton. The Norman church was almost entirely replaced by a building in the Early English style and this was in turn largely replaced in the 15th century.[2] It was restored in 1862 by Sir George Gilbert Scott.[1] During the civil war while Biddulph Hall was under siege, Sir William Brereton's Roundheads stabled their horses in the church. They damaged the medieval glass windows and removed some of the church furniture, including the organ source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary%27s_Church,_Astbury
found on ancestry.com

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