Tuesday, July 12, 2011

KENELM WINSLOW 1599-1672



[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of Abigail Farr (Snow), daughter of Mercy Winslow (Farr), daughter of Thomas Winslow, son of Samuel Winslow, son of Kenelm Winslow, son of Kenelm Winslow.]


Kenelm Winslow Home, Marshfield, Massachusetts




Worden Cemetery a/k/a Winslow Cemetery, East Dennis, Barnstable, Massachusetts





Tombstone inscription: Here Lyes ye Body of Mr Kenelm Winslow Who Dec'd Novem'br ye 11th 1715 in ye 79th Year of His Age (This is an old Lamson carved gravestone.)






Fig. 1: Citation for Kenelm Winslow in the Masters' and Wardens' Account Book, Joiners' & Ceilers' Company of London, 1621-1828, Guildhall Library, City of London, Ms 8041 (FHL British Film 1068631). Courtesy of Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers, Surrey, England.




Droitwich 16th century buildings





Kenelm Winslow Chest

We can only look at circumstantial evidence and present what information is known, with the hope of more definitive attributions if and when more records or documented objects become available. At this point, two seventeenth-century pieces of furniture; a joined chest and a wainscot chair, are associated with Kenelm through the reputation that they belonged to Kenelm's brother, Edward Winslow. The joined chest (Fig. 2) has been on loan to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, since the early twentieth century. A brass plaque fastened to the lid records the family history of the chest: This Chest / was brought to Plymouth in the Ship Mayflower, December 22d /D1620 by Edward Winslow, (afterwards Governor of Plymouth Colony) and / from him, through his great-grand daughter, Elizabeth Winslow, daughter / of the Hon. Isaac Winslow of Marshfield, and wife of Benjamin Marston, Esq. / of Marblehead, in the County of Essex, descended to her greatgrandson, / Benjamin Marston Watson of the City of Boston, its present possessor, who / has caused it to be repaired, and affixed this plate and inscription / this twentieth day of June, in the Year of Our Lord 1830.



Marshfield, Massachusetts





Kenelm Winslow homestead
1630, Marshfield, Massachusetts





Winslow Burying Ground
6 June 2011, Marshfield, Massachusetts





Winslow Burying Ground
6 June 2011, Marshfield, Massachusetts




Old Winslow Burying Ground
6 June 2011, Marshfield, Massachusetts

Birth: April 29, 1599, Worcestershire, England
Death: September 12, 1672, Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
Immigrated in 1629. Settled in Marshfield and made his trade of a joiner. He was deputy to the General Court for eight years.

Parents: Edward and Magdalen (Oliver)

Wife: Ellen (Newton) Adams married 1634. She was the window of John Adams.

Burial:, Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, USA

Plot: Memorial of Eary Settlers of Marshfield
found on findagrave.com - Find A Grave Memorial# 22127060


Winslow Burying Ground
6 June 2011, Marshfield, Massachusetts





Winslow Memorial
10/12/2007, Winslow Cemetery, Marshfield, Plymouth Co., Massachusetts
Memorial of Eary Settlers of Marshfield





Kenelm Winslow estate






Green Harbor Marshfield Monument





Marshfield Cemetery












Brother of Edward Winslow Mayflower
The is a younger brother of Edward Winslow who came on the Mayflower
found on ancestry.com

Marshfield, Massachusetts
From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 7 [July, 1853], pages 276-278.
A FEW FACTS IN THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MARSHFIELD.*
[Page 276]
During the first few years of the settlement of the Plymouth Colony it was the policy of our fathers to concentrate all matters of government, whether parochial, municipal, or colonial, in the place where they first settled, and therefore Plymouth was for many years the only incorporated town in the Colony. Consequently, although many of the most important men dwelt at a considerable distance from this settlement, they were all obliged to perform political duties and attend religious services in this town, to their no small hinderance and trouble.
About the year 1632, the inconvenience of going to Plymouth† for everything being very great, a few precincts were formed, which were subsequently incorporated into towns. To prevent as much as possible a removal of the better sort of persons from Plymouth, it was thought advisable to apportion some of the remotely situated land to such special persons as would promise not to remove, but who would cultivate it by servants in their employ, as farms. Allotments were therefore made of land at a place called Green's Harbor, where no grants had ever been made. This constituted the beginning of the town of Marshfield; which, although it contained a very fair proportion of the intelligent members of the colony, was not incorporated until sometime afterwards. It was known to the aborigines as Missaucatucket, and was first called by the Plymouth people Rexame. On the second of March, 1640-1 , Josias Winslow was "sworne to execute the office of Constable there" [Rexame] "untill June come twelue months." The name Marshfield first appears in the Records, on the first of March, 1641-2. It was first represented in the colonial government in the year 1642, by Thomas Bourne and Kenelm Winslow as Deputies, Edward Winslow and William Thomas, inhabitants of the same town, being at the same time Assistants.
Our excellent fathers watched diligently over the religious interests of new towns, and took special care that a good ministry should he sustained, and that those who had the charge of dispensing the divine word should be particularly provided for in the bestowment of land. In furtherance of this, and for the benefit of the future minister of the territorial district which afterward was incorporated at Marshfield, the following Court Order was passed on the third of March, 1639-40, at a time when there was a controversy between this precinct and the town of Duxbury, concerning their boundary line:—"Whereas there is a controversy betwixt Greens harbour and Duxborrow about the lands betweene the fresh of Greens Harbour riuer and the South Riuer It is ordered and graunted by the Court of freemen to Mr Edward Winslowe & the rest of the Neighbourhood of Greens Harbour a competent prcon of vplands and meddowe betwixt the said Riuers for a farme for a minister and one other competent porcon of land nere vnto the said lot for the minister either for Nehemiah Smyth or some other as the said Inhabitants of Greens harbour shall place in."
In regard to religious instruction, the people of Marshfield were singularly fortunate in possessing for their early teachers, men of excellence, learning and ability.
The first pastor of the Church at Marshfield was Rev. Richard Blinman, a Welchman, who came to New England through the influence of
*Extracted from a private tract printed in 1850, by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, M. D. †About 12 miles.—Ed.

[Page 277]
Governor Winslow. He was admitted to the freedom of the Massachusetts Colony on the seventh of October, 1641, having been previously propounded at Plymouth on the second of March, 1640-1, and soon after moved to Marshfield, where he remained only a very short time. He afterwards was at Gloucester, New London and New Haven, and finally returned to England, and preached in Bristol, where he died at an advanced age. That he was ever settled over the Church, so as to entitle him to be considered its pastor, is doubtful; but the offices which he performed may, through courtesy and with propriety, give him the title, which he perhaps did not have by a regular settlement according to the Custom and manner of the time, over the Marshfield Church.
Rev. Edward Bulkeley, the oldest son of Rev. Peter Bulkeley of Concord, was the second pastor of the Church of Marshfield. He was settled about the year 1642, and left, in 1658, for Concord, where he was afterwards settled, as the successor to his father, in 1660. He was admitted to the fellowship of the First Church in Boston on the twenty-second of March, 1634-5, as a "singleman;" and was dismissed from the same Church on the fifteenth of August, 1641, in the following words:—"Our brother Mr Edward Buckley was by Churches silence consented to he dismissed to ye Church at Concord vpon his & their desire." He was admitted to the freedom of the Plymouth Colony on the fifth of June, 1644. He died, in a good old age, on the second of January, 1695-6, at Chelmsford, and was interred at Concord.
Rev. Samuel Arnold, the third pastor, was settled over the church in 1658. He was admitted to be a freeman of the Colony of New Plymouth on the seventh of June, 1653, having been propounded for freedom on the third of June of the previous year. He was, probably, an early inhabitant of Sandwich, where, in 1643, there was a person of the same name of suitable age to be enrolled among those who were able to perform military duty, he being at that time the only individual in the Colony known to bear that name. Subsequently a Samuel Arnold, undoubtedly the same, was at Yarmouth, where he had a son Samuel born on the ninth day of May, in 1649. He continued with the Marshfield Church until his decease, which occurred on the first of September, 1693. He was succeeded in the ministry by Rev. Edward Tompson in 1696.
The town of Marshfield numbered among its inhabitants some of the most respectable families and useful individuals in the Colony. Among them, and not mentioned in these pages or only slightly alluded to, were those bearing the names of Winslow, Sprague, Bourne, Waterman, Bradford, Howland, Adams, Snow, Eames, Holmes, Weston, Dingley, Russell, Sherman, Williamson, Barker, Beesbeech, Bisbee, Beare, White, Ford, Truant, Chillingsworth, Carver, and Rouse. These are the names of the principal inhabitants previous to the year 1666. Some of them were in the town only a short time, and finally settled elsewhere; while others remained there for several generations.
In August, 1643, forty-nine of the inhabitants of Marshfield were enrolled as being able to do military duty, they being between the ages of sixteen and sixty years.
On the earliest list of freemen, probably taken during, or about, the year 1644, there were only eleven names of persons who belonged to the town of Marshfield. These were, in the orthography of the record, as follow: Mr Edward Winslow Kanelme WinslowMr. Wm Thomas Mr Thomas BurneJosias Winslow Mr Edw Buckley

[Page 278] Robte Waterman John RussellJohn Dingley Mr Nathaniell ThomasThom Shillingsworth
The number of "The names of such as have taken the Oath of Fidelity of the Toune of Marshfield in the yeare 1657," was twenty-seven.
A list, which appears to be of Freemen, without date, but evidently prepared in 1658, contains twenty six names.
The Freemen in 1664 were thirty two in number. Among them was William Shurtleff.
In May, 1670, there were twenty nine Freemen.
In March, 1683-4, the number amounted to sixty three, and contained many names not mentioned in these pages; such as, Foster, Crooker, Little, Dogget, Branch, Hewet, Sylvester, Walker, King, Macall, Wood, Read, Staniford, Childs, Baker, Sayer, Tayler, Rogers and Stevens.
NOTE BY THE EDITOR.—In the preceding "Few Facts" on Marshfield, mention is but barely made of THE REV. EDWARD TOMPSON, a distinguished minister of that ancient town; to the time of this gentleman's death there had not been, probably, so eminent a minister in the town. The inscription on his tombstone is given in the Regr., iv. 316; by which it appears he died 10 March, 1705, aged about 40 years. Mr. Farmer gives the date of his death 16 March, 1705, and says he was probably a son of Benjamin Tompson of Braintree, the distinguished scholar, poet, &e. But in this conjecture Mr. Farmer was wrong, as will hereafter be shown.
Whether Mr. Tompson published anything, is unknown to the writer. He, however, left certain manuscripts which were held in high estimation by the good and learned men of that day, which they published about seven years after his death. A copy of that publication, with an imperfect title page, is in the Editor's library. "[Heaven the best country.] Some of the pious meditations and discourses of that faithful servant of Jesus Christ, MR. EDWARD TOMSON, late pastor of the Church in Marshfield. Who heing dead yet speaketh." Boston, printed 1712.
To this volume there is a Preface signed by "NEH. HOBERT, ZECH. WHITMAN, PETER THACHER, JOHN NORTON, JOHN DANFORTH, and NATH. EELLS."—They commence their Introduction, "Behold a most lively and lovely map of the heavenly country, by the kind Providence of our Lord Jesus Christ, is here presented, drawn by the hand and heart of a faithful and skilful man of God, while he was on the top of the Mount, in the clear view of, and just entering into that gracious and holy land of Promise." No minister could wish to leave behind him a more excellent character than is testified of Mr. Tompson's, by those who knew him best. "In conversation, being holy, humble, meek, patient, sober, temperate, blameless, diligent, useful, and going about doing of good: so, living desired, and dying lamented. Behold we here, a signal instance, wherein the Lord hath dispensed his rich grace in an hereditary way! For this author's grandfather was renowned in England, Virginia and New England, for a worthy confessor of the Lord Jesus Christ, and a seraphical minister and pastor of the Church of Braintrey, of which church afterwards our author's father was for many years a deacon, of excellent virtue, and exemplary holiness," &c.
Thus much it was thought advisable to append to the "Few Facts," that the historian of Marshfield might have, possibly, an additional ray of light to direct him in his labors.
found on ancestry.com

colonial furniture
Furniture history in the United States begins, not with Captain John Smith’s company of gentlemen adventurers in Virginia or with the Hollanders who swapped nineteen dollars worth of beads, hatchets and rum for Manhattan Island, but rather with the austere, nonconforming Englishmen who settled New England. It was they who brought the trade of furniture making from old England and in these new environs were, by 1675, making tables, chairs and chests of distinctly American design. In fact, furniture making in New England can with certainty be said to date from that bleak December day in 1620 when the Pilgrim Fathers with their families, numbering one-hundred persons all told- forsook the Mayflower and scrambled onto Plymouth Rock and dry land. Their ship was only of 120 tons burden and had to carry their provisions and supplies for the colonizing expedition as well as for two trips across the uncharted Atlantic. The Mayflower was 82 feet long, 22 feet beam, and 14 feet from keel to main deck. Into her told Christopher Jones, master of the ship, had to stow the casks of provisions, the supplies and the Pilgrim Father’s chests of household gear.
To comply so that they may sail from Southampton the Pilgrims added John Alden a a Guild trained furniture maker who for the voyage was to work has a cooper John of “Speak for Yourself, John” fame to their number. He was a cooper of twenty-one years. This is how Governor William Bradford in 1650, in his History of the Plymouth Settlement listed him “John Alden, Mr Alden was hired at Southampton as a cooper. Being a likely young man he was desired a settler; but it was left to his own choice to stay or return to England; he stayed and married Pricilla Mullins.”
Thus it happened that the first trained Guild woodcarver came to an English speaking colony on the American Continent. Moreover, Alden prospered and seems to have devoted the 67 years before his death to office holding, farming, trading with the Indians and making furniture making, Occasionally he is referred to in colonial records as a “joyner/carver”.
Four years after the founding of Plymouth, Alden moved to Duxbury, eight miles for Plymouth. This was America’s first suburban development. Here he cleared a farm of 169 acres and in 1653 built the house that is still standing. By 1665 Alden, after many years of membership in the colonial council, was appointed Deputy Governor. Not bad for a man whose only reason for sailing on the Mayflower was to care for the casks of salt meat, beer and water. When he died he left 33 shillings worth of furniture to wit, one table, one form (i.e. bench), one cupboard, tow chairs, bedsteads, chests and boxes. Probably most of these pieces were of his own make but unfortunately none of them has survived that can be identified as genuine John Alden furniture. On the other hand, It is fairly safe to consider that what he did make was just about like the pieces of American furniture made prior to 1687, the year of his death.
John Alden was not the sole citizen of Plymouth trained to furniture making, about 1629 there arrived from the Old Country Kenelm Winslow, brother of Governor. So it went the beginning of the making of Early American Colonial Furniture. In the years following the records are full of the arrival of furniture makers of this sort. Sometimes, like Sergeant Stephen Jacques, the man who built the meeting house at Newburyport, these men are described as builders as well as makers of furniture. Unfortunately what pieces they made out of the oak, maple, pine,chairs, stools, benches, settles, chests big and little, as well as writing boxes and Bible boxes.
found on ancestry.com

Connecting a Lond-Trained Joiner to 1630s Plymouth Colony

by Peter FollansbeeStudies of seventeenth-century New England furniture have often discussed the influence of London training on joiners who came to New England, and how such craftsmen and their objects might have influenced furniture tradesmen throughout the region. A recent study undertaken to identify New England joiners who first trained in London has begun to bear some interesting fruit. The records of the Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers of London provide the earliest written proof of a London connection to a New England joiner.1 The joiner in question is Kenelm Winslow, who arrived in Plymouth Colony in about 1631.Evidence of Kenelm's London training is present in the Master's and Wardens' account books kept by the company from 1621 to 1828. In the relevant account citation the text reads: "Item [received] of Kenelme Winslowe late the apprentice of Abraham Worthington a silver spoone and for his admission iij s iiij d" [3 shillings, 4 pence]. It was standard practice for an apprentice finishing his time to make a payment to the Company, along with a gift of a spoon2 (Fig. 1). What is known of Winslow's training? Guidelines established in 1563, in what has come to be known as the Statute of Artificers,3 detailed the various aspects of apprenticeship arrangements. One important distinction was the length of an apprenticeship and the minimum age at which an apprentice could finish his term:...after the custom and order of the city of London for seven years at the least so the term and years of such apprentice do not expire afore such apprentice shall be of the age of 24 years...4The record of Winslow's admission is undated but follows records from August of 1624. Winslow was baptized May 3, 1599, in Droitwich, Worcestershire, a date that coincides with his admission to the Joiners' Company approximately twenty-five years later. Assuming Winslow's apprenticeship was a standard sevenyear term, he would have been bound to Abraham Worthington around 1617. Unfortunately, the Master's and Wardens' account books that survive begin with the year 1621, leaving no record of his binding. Yet the name "Kenelm" is distinctive enough, and the dates agree so well that it is safe to proceed with the thinking that this is the Kenelm Winslow, joiner, who lived in Plymouth, and later, Marshfield, Massachusetts. In addition, there are no further known records of a Kenelm Winslow in London.Kenelm arrived in Plymouth along with his brother Josiah. Their elder brother Edward had been among the Mayflower passengers who reached Plymouth in 1620. Edward Winslow was quite prominent in the government in Plymouth, serving as assistant governor and governor before returning permanently to England by 1646.5Although other joiners came to New England ahead of Kenelm Winslow, he is the first for whom there is a written record that indicates he was practicing his trade. Within a few years he apparently had enough work to bring on an apprentice. On January 1633/4, Samuel Jenny of Plymouth entered into a contract with Kenelm to learn the "joyners occupacon." The assumption is that Winslow could not teach the boy the trade unless he had enough work to maintain him. The contract is as follows:Jan 6 1633 Sam Jenny, the sonne of John Jenny, by the consent of the said John, hath bound himself apprentise to Kanelm Winslow, of Plymouth, joyner, for the full terme of four yeares, during wch time the said Samuell shall doe faithfull service, as becometh an apprentise, to the said Kanelm. Also the said Kanelm shall exercise the said Samuell in the joyners occupacon, and shall doe his best to instruct him in his said trade, and at the end of his tyme shall dowble appell the said Samuell. But if the said Kanelm shall remove his dwelling from Plymouth, or the liberties thereof, then this covt to be void 6The apprenticeship contract between Winslow and Jenny is unremarkable except for the phrase "Sam Jenny...hath bound himself apprentice...for the full terme of four yeares..." As previously noted, the practice in England, particularly London where Winslow had trained, was for an apprentice's term to be seven years, sometimes longer. It became the practice in New England for an apprentice to be twenty-one years old when he finished his term, not twenty-four. The dissatisfaction withthe shorter apprenticeship term in New England is expressed in regulation put forth in Boston nearly three decades later in 1660:Whereas itt is found by sad experience that many youthes in thisTowne, being put forth Apprentices to severall manufactures and sciences, but for 3 or 4 years time, contrary to the Customs of all well governed places.... if nott timely amended, threatens the welfare of this Towne. Itt is therefore ordered that no person shall henceforth open a shop in this Towne nor occupy any manufacture or science, till hee hath compleated 21 years of age, nor except hee hath served 7 years Apprenticeship...7Winslow's first apprentice, Samuel Jenny, was probably born in Leiden, Holland, where his parents, John Jenny and Sarah Cary, were married on November 1, 1614. The outcome of Samuel Jenny's apprenticeship is uncertain; there are no known period records referring to his trade other than his apprenticeship contract. In 1635, Winslow's second apprentice, John Gardiner, did not finish his time with him, but was turned over to George Kendrick after only one year. The court record stipulates that Kendrick was "...not bound to teach him the trade of joinery."8 This implies that Kendrick was not a tradesman, but a farmer and Gardiner's apprenticeship would now be as an agricultural laborer. There are no further known records identifying other apprentices of Kenelm Winslow.Winslow left Plymouth for Marshfield by 1643. He lived there the rest of his life, although he died in Salem. His probate inventory, dated September 25, 1672, is not all that enlightening. It includes "2 Chests and one Trunke" worth £1 4s; "working tooles" [possibly for his trade though he would have been 73 when he died] at £1 10s and 1 longe Table and a form" also worth £1 10s. Five chairs, with no description, were valued at 10 shillings. His will makes no mention of his trade or tools.9 Wit h the record of Winslow's admission to the Joiners' Company of London we now have certain proof of early transmission of a "London style" of furniture to New England. The next question is, what does that particular London style look like? We lack any surviving furniture with a documented attribution to Kenelm Winslow or his apprentices, though Wallace Nutting was eager to assign pieces to Winslow without any evidence.10We can only look at circumstantial evidence and present what information is known, with the hope of more definitive attributions if and when more records or documented objects become available. At this point, two seventeenth-century pieces of furniture; a joined chest and a wainscot chair, are associated with Kenelm through the reputation that they belonged to Kenelm's brother, Edward Winslow. The joined chest (Fig. 2) has been on loan to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, since the early twentieth century. A brass plaque fastened to the lid records the family history of the chest:This Chest / was brought to Plymouth in the Ship Mayflower, December 22d /D1620 by Edward Winslow, (afterwards Governor of Plymouth Colony) and / from him, through his great-grand daughter, Elizabeth Winslow, daughter / of the Hon. Isaac Winslow of Marshfield, and wife of Benjamin Marston, Esq. / of Marblehead, in the County of Essex, descended to her greatgrandson, / Benjamin Marston Watson of the City of Boston, its present possessor, who / has caused it to be repaired, and affixed this plate and inscription / this twentieth day of June, in the Year of Our Lord 1830. Microanalysis of the chest, however, shows it to be red oak, native to New England, thus dismissing the claim that it was brought over on the Mayflower. The lid, the floor, and the bottom 15 inches of all four stiles are replacements. Two features of the chest that quickly differentiate it from identified Marshfield work are the heavy stock used for the rails (over 1-1/2 inches in thickness) and the small sectioned square stiles. These are about 2 inches square, instead of the typical rectangular stiles seen on most New England chests. The chest's framing members are decorated with "crease" moldings on the faces and beveled edges. These moldings represent the extent of the decoration. The crease moldings are off-center, again an unusual feature. These off-center moldings employed on the muntins create an asymmetrical appearance on the chest's facade.Edward Winslow is traditionally also believed to have been the first owner of a wainscot chair now in the collection of the Pilgrim Society in Plymouth, Massachusetts (Fig. 3). This chair, like the joined chest, is made of red oak, thus again indicating a New England origin. The chair has plain columnar turnings on the front stiles, incised carved decoration in the crest rail, and scroll-work edges cut into the seat rails on the front and sides. The rear stiles extend up behind the crest rail, using a joint that has come to be called a "lipped" tenon. This type of tenon appears on dozens of Plymouth Colony chests with drawers and on wainscot cupboards. The chair is notable for its evidence of pit sawing on its seat boards, the bottom surface of the forward seat board shows the irregular marks from handsawing as opposed to the regularly spaced kerfs from a water-powered sawmill. While the joiner used a sawn board for the seat, the rear panel is made from three riven oak boards, edge glued together. The crest rail extends beyond the stiles, leading to the possibility that there were brackets, yet no mortise or other evidence for brackets is apparent. The wainscot chair was donated to the Pilgrim Society by Abby Frothingham (Gay) Winslow (1816–1905), wife of Isaac Winslow (1813–1883), a descendant of Edward Winslow. In a letter dated December 27, 1882, Isaac recorded the family history concerning the chair, as well as a table also at Pilgrim Hall:You ask about the table and chair. I do not know much about them but presume from their make they must have come down not long after the May Flower's time. My own impression is that it was the chair and table used by the Governor and Council of Plymouth Colony and after the Colony was absorbed by Massachusetts they naturally fell into the hands of the Winslow family. When I was young and lived in Marshfield I always noticed that the chair and table were always spoken of as 'the Governor's chair and Table.'11 The common thread is that these objects belonged to Edward Winslow because family legend has always maintained that they did. If we could verify that either the wainscot chair or chest were in fact Edward's, then their date range would be very limited because Edward Winslow had moved from Plymouth to Marshfield by 1639, and had returned to England by 1645. There is no inventory of his estate in Marshfield, however, a deed concerning the Plymouth house includes a chair as part of the sale:[7th March 1645] Mr Edward Winslow doth acknowledg That for and in consideracon of the sum of thirty eight pounds allowed upon the said account in payment to Mr John Beauchamp Hath freely and absolutely bargained and sold unto Mr Edmond ffreeman All that his house scittuate in Plymouth wth the garden Backhouse doores locks bolts Wainscote glasse and Wainscote bedstead in the parlor wth the truckle bed a chaire in the study and all the shelves as now the are in eich roome wth yeard roomth and fences about the same and all & every their apprtenc...unto the said Edmond ffreeman his heires and Assignes for ever...12With such limited decoration on both the chest and the chair, it is impossible to link them to a common maker. The molding profiles on the chair do not match those on the chest; there are virtually no other features that could be compared with any confidence. There are several examples of joined work surviving from the town of Plymouth, but they do not form a cohesive group, and have thus escaped attribution to known makers.13 Based on the surviving body of work, there were several productive shops in Marshfield between the mid-1630s and 1700. Among the best-established shops was that of joiner Thomas Little (here 1630–died 1672). A joined chest that descended in his family, on display in the Isaac Winslow house in Marshfield, is the keystone of this group (Fig. 4). Related chests are in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution (Fig. 5) (in their Greenwood Collection) and Historic New England (Fig. 6). All three chests feature plain panels, but use more elaborate moldings run in the framing members, and stopped chamfers at the junction of the stiles, rails, and muntins. The chests are seemingly related to the larger body of Plymouth Colony joined furniture represented by the many chests with drawers and press cupboards featuring geometric patterns formed with applied moldings and turnings, and painted decoration. A table with drawer (Fig. 7), also part of the Smithsonian Institution's Greenwood collection, is likewise connected to works from Marshfield, though not necessarily Little's shop. The decoration consists of carved intersecting lunettes on the drawer front, moldings on the drawer rail and side rails, and baluster turnings on the stiles. Red paint, presumably iron oxide pigment, highlights some of these features. The table relates to other known works with Marshfield connections, though these are not yet attributed to a known shop.14The Winslow chair at Pilgrim Hall has some attributes that compare favorably with several of these known works from Marshfield, specifically the scrolled decoration on the seat rails, crease moldings on some of the framing, and the lipped tenon on the joint between the rear stiles and the crest rail. Because of its extensive restoration, the Winslow joined chest at the MFA cannot be reliably attributed to any known group of surviving furniture.The discovery of Kenelm Winslow's admission to the Worshipful Company of Ceilers and Joyners of London warrants a reexamination of Plymouth Colony joiners and joinery to determine the impact of Winslow's London training, if any, on the style of furniture made in the Colony.
found on ancestry.com

furniture maker
Studi es of seventeenth-century New England furniture have often discussed the influence of London training on joiners who came to New England, and how such craftsmen and their objects might have influenced furniture tradesmen throughout the region. A recent study undertaken to identify New England joiners who first trained in London has begun to bear some interesting fruit. The records of the Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers of London provide the earliest written proof of a London connection to a New England joiner.1 The joiner in question is Kenelm Winslow, who arrived in Plymouth Colony in about 1631.Evidence of Kenelm's London training is present in the Master's and Wardens' account books kept by the company from 1621 to 1828. In the relevant account citation the text reads: "Item [received] of Kenelme Winslowe late the apprentice of Abraham Worthington a silver spoone and for his admission iij s iiij d" [3 shillings, 4 pence]. It was standard practice for an apprentice finishing his time to make a payment to the Company, along with a gift of a spoon2 (Fig. 1). Fig. 1: Citation for Kenelm Winslow in the Masters' and Wardens' Account Book, Joiners' & Ceilers' Company of London, 1621-1828, Guildhall Library, City of London, Ms 8041 (FHL British Film 1068631). Courtesy of Worshipful Company of Joiners and Ceilers, Surrey, England.What is known of Winslow's training? Guidelines established in 1563, in what has come to be known as the Statute of Artificers,3 detailed the various aspects of apprenticeship arrangements. One important distinction was the length of an apprenticeship and the minimum age at which an apprentice could finish his term:...after the custom and order of the city of London for seven years at the least so the term and years of such apprentice do not expire afore such apprentice shall be of the age of 24 years...4The record of Winslow's admission is undated but follows records from August of 1624. Winslow was baptized May 3, 1599, in Droitwich, Worcestershire, a date that coincides with his admission to the Joiners' Company approximately twenty-five years later. Assuming Winslow's apprenticeship was a standard sevenyear term, he would have been bound to Abraham Worthington around 1617. Unfortunately, the Master's and Wardens' account books that survive begin with the year 1621, leaving no record of his binding. Yet the name "Kenelm" is distinctive enough, and the dates agree so well that it is safe to proceed with the thinking that this is the Kenelm Winslow, joiner, who lived in Plymouth, and later, Marshfield, Massachusetts. In addition, there are no further known records of a Kenelm Winslow in London.Kenelm arrived in Plymouth along with his brother Josiah. Their elder brother Edward had been among the Mayflower passengers who reached Plymouth in 1620. Edward Winslow was quite prominent in the government in Plymouth, serving as assistant governor and governor before returning permanently to England by 1646.5Although other joiners came to New England ahead of Kenelm Winslow, he is the first for whom there is a written record that indicates he was practicing his trade. Within a few years he apparently had enough work to bring on an apprentice. On January 1633/4, Samuel Jenny of Plymouth entered into a contract with Kenelm to learn the "joyners occupacon." The assumption is that Winslow could not teach the boy the trade unless he had enough work to maintain him. The contract is as follows:Jan 6 1633 Sam Jenny, the sonne of John Jenny, by the consent of the said John, hath bound himself apprentise to Kanelm Winslow, of Plymouth, joyner, for the full terme of four yeares, during wch time the said Samuell shall doe faithfull service, as becometh an apprentise, to the said Kanelm. Also the said Kanelm shall exercise the said Samuell in the joyners occupacon, and shall doe his best to instruct him in his said trade, and at the end of his tyme shall dowble appell the said Samuell. But if the said Kanelm shall remove his dwelling from Plymouth, or the liberties thereof, then this covt to be void 6The apprenticeship contract between Winslow and Jenny is unremarkable except for the phrase "Sam Jenny...hath bound himself apprentice...for the full terme of four yeares..." As previously noted, the practice in England, particularly London where Winslow had trained, was for an apprentice's term to be seven years, sometimes longer. It became the practice in New England for an apprentice to be twenty-one years old when he finished his term, not twenty-four. The dissatisfaction withthe shorter apprenticeship term in New England is expressed in regulation put forth in Boston nearly three decades later in 1660:Whereas itt is found by sad experience that many youthes in thisTowne, being put forth Apprentices to severall manufactures and sciences, but for 3 or 4 years time, contrary to the Customs of all well governed places.... if nott timely amended, threatens the welfare of this Towne. Itt is therefore ordered that no person shall henceforth open a shop in this Towne nor occupy any manufacture or science, till hee hath compleated 21 years of age, nor except hee hath served 7 years Apprenticeship...7Winslow's first apprentice, Samuel Jenny, was probably born in Leiden, Holland, where his parents, John Jenny and Sarah Cary, were married on November 1, 1614. The outcome of Samuel Jenny's apprenticeship is uncertain; there are no known period records referring to his trade other than his apprenticeship contract. In 1635, Winslow's second apprentice, John Gardiner, did not finish his time with him, but was turned over to George Kendrick after only one year. The court record stipulates that Kendrick was "...not bound to teach him the trade of joinery."8 This implies that Kendrick was not a tradesman, but a farmer and Gardiner's apprenticeship would now be as an agricultural laborer. There are no further known records identifying other apprentices of Kenelm Winslow.Winslow left Plymouth for Marshfield by 1643. He lived there the rest of his life, although he died in Salem. His probate inventory, dated September 25, 1672, is not all that enlightening. It includes "2 Chests and one Trunke" worth £1 4s; "working tooles" [possibly for his trade though he would have been 73 when he died] at £1 10s and 1 longe Table and a form" also worth £1 10s. Five chairs, with no description, were valued at 10 shillings. His will makes no mention of his trade or tools.9 Fig. 2: Joined chest, probably Marshfield, Ma., 1630-1700. Red oak, pine, iron handles. H. 33-1/8, W. 44, D. 21-1/8 in. Lent by Licut Henry Lee Watson. Courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.With the record of Winslow's admission to the Joiners' Company of London we now have certain proof of early transmission of a "London style" of furniture to New England. The next question is, what does that particular London style look like? We lack any surviving furniture with a documented attribution to Kenelm Winslow or his apprentices, though Wallace Nutting was eager to assign pieces to Winslow without any evidence.10We can only look at circumstantial evidence and present what information is known, with the hope of more definitive attributions if and when more records or documented objects become available. At this point, two seventeenth-century pieces of furniture; a joined chest and a wainscot chair, are associated with Kenelm through the reputation that they belonged to Kenelm's brother, Edward Winslow. The joined chest (Fig. 2) has been on loan to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, since the early twentieth century. A brass plaque fastened to the lid records the family history of the chest:This Chest / was brought to Plymouth in the Ship Mayflower, December 22d /D1620 by Edward Winslow, (afterwards Governor of Plymouth Colony) and / from him, through his great-grand daughter, Elizabeth Winslow, daughter / of the Hon. Isaac Winslow of Marshfield, and wife of Benjamin Marston, Esq. / of Marblehead, in the County of Essex, descended to her greatgrandson, / Benjamin Marston Watson of the City of Boston, its present possessor, who / has caused it to be repaired, and affixed this plate and inscription / this twentieth day of June, in the Year of Our Lord 1830. Fig. 3: Wainscot chair, Plymouth or Marshfield, Ma, ca. 1630-1645. Red oak. H. 41-1/2, W. 24, D. 16-1/2 in. Gift of Abby Frothingham Winslow, 1882. Courtesy of Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, Ma. PHM 944. Photography by J. David Bohl.Microanalysis of the chest, however, shows it to be red oak, native to New England, thus dismissing the claim that it was brought over on the Mayflower. The lid, the floor, and the bottom 15 inches of all four stiles are replacements. Two features of the chest that quickly differentiate it from identified Marshfield work are the heavy stock used for the rails (over 1-1/2 inches in thickness) and the small sectioned square stiles. These are about 2 inches square, instead of the typical rectangular stiles seen on most New England chests. The chest's framing members are decorated with "crease" moldings on the faces and beveled edges. These moldings represent the extent of the decoration. The crease moldings are off-center, again an unusual feature. These off-center moldings employed on the muntins create an asymmetrical appearance on the chest's facade.Edward Winslow is traditionally also believed to have been the first owner of a wainscot chair now in the collection of the Pilgrim Society in Plymouth, Massachusetts (Fig. 3). This chair, like the joined chest, is made of red oak, thus again indicating a New England origin. The chair has plain columnar turnings on the front stiles, incised carved decoration in the crest rail, and scroll-work edges cut into the seat rails on the front and sides. The rear stiles extend up behind the crest rail, using a joint that has come to be called a "lipped" tenon. This type of tenon appears on dozens of Plymouth Colony chests with drawers and on wainscot cupboards. The chair is notable for its evidence of pit sawing on its seat boards, the bottom surface of the forward seat board shows the irregular marks from handsawing as opposed to the regularly spaced kerfs from a water-powered sawmill. While the joiner used a sawn board for the seat, the rear panel is made from three riven oak boards, edge glued together. The crest rail extends beyond the stiles, leading to the possibility that there were brackets, yet no mortise or other evidence for brackets is apparent. Fig. 4: Joined chest, attributed to Thomas Little (in MA by 1630–1672), Marshfield, Ma, 1680–1720. Red oak, pine, iron hardware. H. 27, W. 52, D. 20 in. Courtesy of the Isaac Winslow House, Marshfield, Ma. Descended in the Little family of Marshfield through Mary Little Winslow (1704–1772). Pine top may be replaced.The wainscot chair was donated to the Pilgrim Society by Abby Frothingham (Gay) Winslow (1816–1905), wife of Isaac Winslow (1813–1883), a descendant of Edward Winslow. In a letter dated December 27, 1882, Isaac recorded the family history concerning the chair, as well as a table also at Pilgrim Hall:You ask about the table and chair. I do not know much about them but presume from their make they must have come down not long after the May Flower's time. My own impression is that it was the chair and table used by the Governor and Council of Plymouth Colony and after the Colony was absorbed by Massachusetts they naturally fell into the hands of the Winslow family. When I was young and lived in Marshfield I always noticed that the chair and table were always spoken of as 'the Governor's chair and Table.'11 Fig. 5: Joined chest, attributed to Thomas Little, (in Massachusetts by 1630–1672), Marshfield, Ma, 1680-1720. Red oak, Atlantic white cedar, white pine. H. 26-3/4, W. 52-3/8, D. 21 in. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Behring Center, Washington, D.C.The common thread is that these objects belonged to Edward Winslow because family legend has always maintained that they did. If we could verify that either the wainscot chair or chest were in fact Edward's, then their date range would be very limited because Edward Winslow had moved from Plymouth to Marshfield by 1639, and had returned to England by 1645. There is no inventory of his estate in Marshfield, however, a deed concerning the Plymouth house includes a chair as part of the sale:[7th March 1645] Mr Edward Winslow doth acknowledg That for and in consideracon of the sum of thirty eight pounds allowed upon the said account in payment to Mr John Beauchamp Hath freely and absolutely bargained and sold unto Mr Edmond ffreeman All that his house scittuate in Plymouth wth the garden Backhouse doores locks bolts Wainscote glasse and Wainscote bedstead in the parlor wth the truckle bed a chaire in the study and all the shelves as now the are in eich roome wth yeard roomth and fences about the same and all & every their apprtenc...unto the said Edmond ffreeman his heires and Assignes for ever...12With such limited decoration on both the chest and the chair, it is impossible to link them to a common maker. The molding profiles on the chair do not match those on the chest; there are virtually no other features that could be compared with any confidence. Fig. 6: Joined chest, Scituate/Marshfield, Ma, 1680-1700. Red oak, northern white cedar, white pine. H. 27-5/8, W. 52-3/4, D. 20-5/8 in. Gift of Mrs. Stephen H. Nash in memory of Chauncy C. Nash. Courtesy of Historic New England, 1971.372.There are several examples of joined work surviving from the town of Plymouth, but they do not form a cohesive group, and have thus escaped attribution to known makers.13 Based on the surviving body of work, there were several productive shops in Marshfield between the mid-1630s and 1700. Among the best-established shops was that of joiner Thomas Little (here 1630–died 1672). A joined chest that descended in his family, on display in the Isaac Winslow house in Marshfield, is the keystone of this group (Fig. 4). Related chests are in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution (Fig. 5) (in their Greenwood Collection) and Historic New England (Fig. 6). All three chests feature plain panels, but use more elaborate moldings run in the framing members, and stopped chamfers at the junction of the stiles, rails, and muntins. The chests are seemingly related to the larger body of Plymouth Colony joined furniture represented by the many chests with drawers and press cupboards featuring geometric patterns formed with applied moldings and turnings, and painted decoration. Fig. 7: Table with drawer, probably Marshfield, Ma, 1650-1700. Oak, ash and white pine. H. 23, W. of frame 34-3/4, D. of frame 18 in. Courtesy of the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Behring Center, Washington, D.C.A table with drawer (Fig. 7), also part of the Smithsonian Institution's Greenwood collection, is likewise connected to works from Marshfield, though not necessarily Little's shop. The decoration consists of carved intersecting lunettes on the drawer front, moldings on the drawer rail and side rails, and baluster turnings on the stiles. Red paint, presumably iron oxide pigment, highlights some of these features. The table relates to other known works with Marshfield connections, though these are not yet attributed to a known shop.14The Winslow chair at Pilgrim Hall has some attributes that compare favorably with several of these known works from Marshfield, specifically the scrolled decoration on the seat rails, crease moldings on some of the framing, and the lipped tenon on the joint between the rear stiles and the crest rail. Because of its extensive restoration, the Winslow joined chest at the MFA cannot be reliably attributed to any known group of surviving furniture.The discovery of Kenelm Winslow's admission to the Worshipful Company of Ceilers and Joyners of London warrants a reexamination of Plymouth Colony joiners and joinery to determine the impact of Winslow's London training, if any, on the style of furniture made in the Colony.
Peter Follansbee has practiced traditional woodworking for over twenty-five years and since 1994 has been the joiner at Plimoth Plantation in Massachusetts. He has written, lectured and demonstrated extensively on the subject of the seventeenthcentury joiner's techniques, both structural and decorative.
1. The records of the Joiners' Company of London are not complete for the whole seventeenth century, but many of the years pertinent to the Great Migration are extant.2. Family History Library microfilm #1068631; Masters' and Wardens' Account Books, Joiners' Company of London, 1621–1828. Guildhall Library, City of London, Ms 8041.3. The original title was "An Act touching divers orders for artificers, laborers, servants of husbandry and apprentices."4. Margaret Gay Davies, The Enforcement of English Apprenticeship: A Study of Applied Mercantilism 1563–1642 (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956) pp. 271–745. A search made in these records from 1621 to 1640 produced no further record for Kenelm Winslow or for his master, Abraham Worthington. For biographical details of Kenelm Winslow, see Robert Charles Anderson, The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony 1620–1633 (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004), 518–521; for Edward Winslow, ibid. 507–510.6. Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer, eds.; Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, (Boston: from the press of William White, 1855–1861) 1:247. Reports of the Record Commissioners of the City of Boston: Record Relating to the Early History of Boston (Boston: Rockwell & Churchill, 1876–1909) 39 vols., 2: pt 1, pp. 156, 157 quoted in Benno M. Forman, American Seating Furniture 1630–1730, (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1988), 58.8. For Samuel Jenny, see the entry for his father, John Jenny in Anderson, Pilgrim Migration, pp. 291–296. Robert Blair St. George in The Wrought Covenant: Source Material for the Study of Craftsmen and Community in Southeastern New England 1620–1700, (Brockton, Massachusetts: Fuller Art Museum, 1979) provides an excellent overview of Plymouth Colony joinery. He refers to Jenny as a joiner, but the only citation is the apprenticeship contract with Kenelm Winslow. See p. 88. John Gardiner stayed with Kendrick only a year, the court records note that he was turned over to a new master once again. See Shurtleff and Pulsifer, eds.; Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, 1:37, 44–45.9. Kenelm Winslow will and inventory, Plymouth Colony Probate Records, vol. 3, pt 1, f.56–7.10. In his discussion of the Tracy family wainscot cupboard, now at Winterthur, Wallace Nutting, in Furniture of the Pilgrim Century (Framingham, Massachusetts: Old America Company, 1924) wrote: "The strong assumption is that John Alden or Kenelm Winslow built these cupboards and chests." Alden is not a candidate, being a cooper; and Winslow has yet to be effectively connected to any surviving artifacts.11. The author thanks Stephen O'Neill, curator at Pilgrim Hall for providing access to the wainscot chair, and his detailed reports from the files concerning its history.12. Edward Winslow's deeds concerning his Plymouth house are found in Shurtleff and Pulsifer, eds.; Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, 12:129, 50–51.13. See St. George, figs. 41-43, 53.14. For the table and a related box, see St. George, The Wrought Covenant, figs. 7 & 8, p. 31.
found on ancestry.com

history
From jimsancestry.net
Kenelm Winslow
Husband: Kenelm WinslowBorn: in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, 30 April 1599.Baptized: in Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, 3 May 1599.Died: 12 September 1672, while living in America and on a visit to Salem, MA. Buried in Salem.Father: Edward WinslowMother: Magdalen Oliver.Wife:Ellen (-----) Newton AdamsBorn: in England, circa 1598.Died: in Marshfield, MA, 5 December 1681, aged 83.Parents: Unknown.Married: in Plymouth, MA, June 1634.Note: We know that in English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers by Charles E. Banks, she was called Mrs. Ellen Newton, widow, when at age 25, in the year 1623, she emigrated from England to America on the ship Anne. By the time of the 1627 division of land and cattle in Plymouth, MA, she was married to John Adams who came from England to Plymouth, MA, in the Fortune in 1621. John Adams died in 1633 leaving his widow, Ellen, and at least one son, James Adams.
Kenelm was a younger brother of Gov. Edward Winslow of the Plymouth Colony, America. Their father, Edward, was born in England, 17 October 1560, and was probably a descendant of the Winslow family which existed in Kempsey, Worcestershire, England, before 1500. To support this assumption, we find that the Winslow estate in Kempsey, England, was called "Kerswell" and the Winslow estate in Plymouth, MA, was called "Careswell".
Kenelm Winslow came to America with his brother, Josias, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, ME, July of 1631. Other brothers had come earlier, John who came in the Fortune in 1621, and Edward and Gilbert who came in the Mayflower in 1620.
At the time of his marriage to Ellen, Kenelm put up security to pay James Adams, son of his new wife and her deceased husband, John Adams, 5 pounds when he became of age. Plymouth County records show that this sum was paid on 26 December 1651.
Kenelm became a "freeman" in Plymouth on 1 January 1632-33. In 1633, Kenelm and his brother, Josias, bought a dwelling from Francis Eaton with the records showing that Josias sold his half in 1634. After their marriage in June, 1634, Kenelm and Ellen lived in Marshfield and he received various land grants, including one in Yarmouth in 1640 where he participated in the settlement of that town. In 1642, and often later, he was a representative from Marshfield. On 1 June 1647, he was chosen constable in Marshfield and from 1649 onward was frequently a deputy in Marshfield.
Kenelm was a carpenter and a cabinet maker and the official coffin maker of the colony. According to my notes, source unknown to me and not verified by a personal visit or inquiry to any museums, he was the designer and maker of fine furniture, many pieces of which have been preserved in the Metropolitan and other museums.
According to Plymouth Colony, Its History and Peoples by Stratton, p 376 and 377, Kenelm was involved in several disputes which were settled by the courts:
"On Dec. 1, 1640, he was fined for neglecting his duty as an elected highway surveyor ( PCR 2 :4 )."
"On June 4, 1645, a committee consisting of Myles Standish and six other men reported that a complaint of injustice about a court case made by Kenelm was untrue and the committee found the Bench and jury were without fault. The court ordered Kenelm imprisoned and fined 10 pounds. On his petition the same day in which he acknowledged his offence and sorrow for same, he was released from imprisonment and his fine suspended for one year to be remitted at the end of that time if he showed good behavior (PCR 2:85)."
"On May 5, 1646, Kenelm was sued by Roger Chandler for keeping his daughter's clothes on the pretense that she owed Kenelm further service. The court ordered Kenelm to return the clothes (PCR 2:98)."
"On the same day, May 5, 1646, the court ordered Kenelm to find 'sureties' for his good behavior for uttering 'opprobrious' words against the Marshfield Church. Kenelm evidently claimed that several members were 'lyers' etc. Kenelm refused to do so and he was sentenced to prison, where he remained until the next court (PCR 2:98)."
"On March 7, 1653-54, Kenelm made a complaint against John Soule for speaking falsely against Kenelm's daughter and 'scandalizing' her in carrying false reports between her and Josias Standish (PCR 3:46)."
Kenelm Winslow's will, dated 8 August 1672, proved 5 June 1673, named his wife, his four children, his grandchild Kenelm Baker, and asked his wife to give Mary Adams (child of James Adams, I assume) an equal share of his personal property with the rest of his grandchildren.
Kenelm and his wife Ellen (-----) Newton Adams Winslow had four children:
Kenelm, b. 1635; m. Mercy -----.
Ellen, b. 1637; m. Samuel Baker.
Nathaniel, b. 1639; m. Faith Miller.
Job, b. 1641.
found on ancestry.com

servant John Gardiner
Rrom queenanneswar.com
“John, Plymouth, servant to Kenelm Winslow, was transferred to George Kenrick in 1635. Propr. 2 Nov. 1640. Settled at Hingham. Propr. 1656. Wife Mary; ch. John bapt. at H. July 17, 1652, Francis bapt. March 31, 1653, Mary bapt. Nov. 19, 1654, (m. Nathan Farrow,) Samuel bapt. March 23, 1655/56, Deborah bapt. July 5, 1657, James bapt. Feb. 4, 1659/60, Stephen bapt. Aug. 14, 1662, Thomas bapt. June 5, 1664, Benjamin bapt. April 7, 1666, Christian bapt. June 3, 1668 (m. Joseph Dunbar.) He d. 24 Nov. 1668. Inv. filed 28 April, 1669.”
Pope’s list of children and their baptismal dates are identical with that of Lincoln, the only difference being added information from Lincoln regarding marriages of the children of John 1. The information in Pope’s account about Plymouth and John 1’s apparent indenture periods and owning of land in Plymouth prior to becoming a proprietor in Hingham may bear potential for further research on him. From Pope’s account, he appears to have arrived in Massachusetts perhaps even prior to 1635, but no later than that date. If it was prior, then the Gardiner family would be the earliest of the families connected by marriage with the Orcutts to settle in New England.
Possible corroboration for Pope’s account of this Plymouth episode comes in Eugene Aubrey Stratton’s Plymouth Colony, Its History and People 1620-1691, 1986, p. 376: “On 22 February 1635/36 John Gardiner, a servant of Kenelm Winslow, had the rest of his time turned over to George Kenrick (PCR 1:37).” Kenelm Winslow, a brother of the Edward Winslow who became governor of Plymouth Colony, arrived at Plymouth before 1 January 1632/33 when he became a freeman (PCR 1:5). Edward Winslow [and thus Kenelm Winslow as his brother] was son of Edward and Magdalene (Oliver) Winslow of Droitwich, Worcestershire, England. The first 3
Edward was a prosperous salt merchant, son of Kenelm Winslow, “yeoman.” His son the second Edward went to Leiden where he became associated with William Brewster in the printing business. He was a principal diplomat and trade negotiator, Assistant, and governor in Plymouth. Stratton’s account of the Winslow/Kendrick agreement is as follows (p. 182): “Kenelm Winslow’s servant, John Gardiner, by the agreement of all concerned, was turned over on 22 February 1635/36 to George Kendrick, and Kendrick was to assume Winslow’s obligations to Gardiner, except that Gardiner, in return for an extra six bushels of corn at the end of his term, was willing to free Kendrick of being obligated to teach him the trade of joinery.” (Stratton cited PCR 1:37 for this statement.) Kenelm Winslow is described in other references as “joyner.” Joinery is the early term for furniture carpentry. This stipulation suggests that John Gardiner could have functioned as an apprentice to Winslow, who also had Samuel Jenny apprenticed to him for four years on 6 January 1633/34 (Stratton, p. 376, citing as source PCR 2:176.) George Kenrick, to whom John Gardiner’s service was turned over, is named to a group charged in March 1636/37 to study the feasibility of moving the town of Plymouth (Stratton, p. 76).
found on ancestry.com

Biography of Kenelm Winslow
1600s
Kenelm's grandfather was Kenelm Winslow who owned an estate called Clerkenleaf near Worcester, England. He bought Newport Place in Kempsey from Sir Richard Newport in 1559. He died in 1607 at St. Andrew's Parish, Worcester Coounty, leaving a widow and son, Edward.
Edward married Eleanor Pelham, daughter of Sir Herbert Pelham of Droitwich, a town north of Kempsey. Their children were Edward, John, Kenelm and Gilbert.
Kenelm Winslow - the first American ancestor - was born April 29, 1599 in Droitwich, England and came to Massachusetts on the ship Fortune in 1629. In 1634 he married Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams of Plymouth. They moved to Marshfield, MA in 1641.
Kenelm was a planter with shipping interests. He was Representative to the General Court of Massachusetts Colony in 1642, 1644, and 1648. He owned considerable land. Died on September 13, 1672 at age 73. Buried in Salem, MA. Eleanor died on Dec. 5, 1681 at Marshfield.
found on ancestry.com

Immigrant
D: I0148
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestr y.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kbnaycwin&id=I0148

Name: Kenelm "Immigrant" Winslow
Sex: M
Birth: 29 APR 1599 in Droitwich , Worcestershire, England
Death: 12 SEP 1672 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts
Residence: 1629-Plymouth(Freeman 1632-33); Marshfield 1641
Occupation: Joiner; Carpenter; cabinet maker, coffin maker; planter; designer and builder of fine furniture in early colony; many pieces preserved in Metropolitan Museum
Burial: 13 SEP 1672 Salem, Mass
Emigration: BET 1629 AND 1632 maybe 1629 - perhaps on another Mayflower ship from England
Event: Misc considered a Founding Father ( surviving settler) of New Plymouth
Note:
Kenelm Winslow (1599-1672) our 1st immigrant ancestor: The Winslow family from England emerged in the early 14th century England as a loosely knit clan living in the vicinity of the hamlet of Winslow, in Buckinghamshire (50 miles northwest of London) from which they adopted their name. A brother of Edward Winslow ( a Mayflower passenger and Plymouth diplomat and trade negotiator, and governor) , Kenelm was not in the 1627 Division of Cattle (a sharing of the common assets as the town of Plymouth grew). But he arrived at Plymouth before January 1, 1632-33 when he became a freeman (he was not a servant but freeman meant he was entitled to vote). On January 6, 1633-34 Samuel Jenny- son of John Jenny- was apprenticed to Kenelm Winslow, a joyner, for four years. Kenelm married in June 1634 Ellen (Eleanor) Newton Adams, widow of John Adams (not the President John Adams family) who came over on the ship Fortune in 1621; she died in Marshfield, Mass December 5, 1681. On February 5, 1635 John Gardiner a servant of Kenelm had the rest of his time turned over to George Kenrick. Kenelm received various land grants and served on committees and juries. On December 1, 1640 , however, he was fined for neglecting his duty as an elected highway surveyor.On June 4, 1645 a committee (with Myles Standish) examined a complaint of injustice by Kenelm, reported that Kenelm's charge was untrue. He had charged that he could not be heard in a case between himself and John Maynard, but the committee found the Bench without fault and the court ordered that him imprisoned and fined 10 pounds. On his petition the same day, in which he acknowledged his offense and sorrow for same, he was released from imprisonment and his fine was suspended for one year and then if he showed good behavior it would be remitted.Other information on Kenelm Winslow and descendents can be found in the Winslow Memorial. Kenelm supposedly came on the second Mayflower - not the same ship as the first one."Mayflower" was apparently a very popular name for ships in those days! The Pilgrim Company and assorted others bound for Plymouth mostly came on the first Mayflower in 1620, the Fortune in 1621, the Shallop from Sparrow in 1622, the Anne of London in 1623, and the second Mayflower in 1629. Of course, there were other ships that called at Plymouth too - the Little James, the Talbott, and the Handmaid, among others.As the head of the family (because he was the oldest brother), Edward Winslow was fittingly the first Winslow to arrive in the New World. Edward was only 25 years old when he made this tremendous change in his life. Gilbert, who accompanied him, was a mere 20. In 1620, Miles Standish was 36 and good, grey William Bradford (as one thinks of him) was only 31. Brewster was an exception: he was 54. John Winslow was about 24 when he emigrated in 1621, and Kenelm was 30 in 1629. Potential but unsubstantiated Story on Kenelm coming to America:Kenelm was born at Droitwich, Worcester, England, April 29, 1599, son of Edward and Magdalene (pronounced Maudlyn in England) (Ollyver or Oliver) Winslow. They were married November 4, 1594 at St. Bride’s, London. Kenelm was the fifth child born to Edward and Magdalene and was the brother of Edward Winslow (an early Governor of Plymouth Plantation) who arrived on the Mayflower in 1620. Kenelm’s father was a salt manufacturer. Kenelm arrived at Plymouth May 15, 1629 from Gravesend in a party of 35 on the Mayflower -a second ship by the popular name. Among the strangers was Kenelm Winslow, another brother of Edward (The Pilgrim Way, by Bartlett). Kenelm was a skilled cabinet maker and his furniture subsequently brought high prices on the antique market. He was admitted Freeman of the Colony in 1632.Another Story not proven: Kenelm Winslow came to America with his brother, Josias, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, ME, July of 1631. Other brothers had come earlier, John who came in the Fortune in 1621, and Edward and Gilbert who came in the Mayflower in 1620.He married Elinor (Ellen) Worden Newton Adams June 1, 1634. She arrived on the Anne at Plymouth on July 10, 1623. Elinor was a young widow of 25 when she emigrated, marrying John Adams, a carpenter, who died in 1633. Adams had arrived on the “Fortune” in 1621. Elinor died December 5, 1681 at Marshfield, MA (where she is buried), 83 years of age.Kenelm was surveyor for the town of Plymouth (1640). He was fined 10 shillings for “neglecting the highways”. He removed to Marshfield in 1641 where he had a grant of land which was considered the “Eden of the region”. He was one of the 26 original proprietors of Assonet, Mass., purchased from the Indians on April 2, 1659. He was a joiner by trade and a planter. Was deputy to the General Court (1642-44 and 1649-53). He had considerable litigation and was apparently of a quarrelsome disposition having spent about four weeks in prison for calling the church leaders of Marshfield liars. Kenelm died at Salem, Mass. September 13, 1672 whither he had gone on business.The Winslow ancestral home, the present Kerswell Green Farm, parts of which date from 1340, is located in Kempsey (nr. Worcester), England. Kenelm’s grandfather (also named Kenelm) lived at Kerswell Green and was Churchwarden in Kempsey in 1593. His eldest son, Edward (father of our Kenelm), left to become a salt manufacturer in Droitwich. While the four Winslow brothers left for the New World, some of the Winslow family remained in Kempsey. John Winslow was Churchwarden (1675-1690), his son, Richard, was the Bishop’s Bailiff around 1701 and also Churchwarden (1703-05) and another son was Curate from 1695-1702.Kenelm was a carpenter and a cabinet maker and the official coffin maker of the colony. According to some thoughts, he was the designer and maker of fine furniture, many pieces of which have been preserved in the Metropolitan and other museums.-----------------------------------------------------1. KENELM1 Winslow, third son and fourth child of Edward Winslow and Magdalene (Ollyver) of Droitwich, Worcestershire, Eng., was born at that place, on Sunday, 29 April, 1599, and baptized the Thursday following, 3May, 1599; he "dyed at Salem and was buried there 13 Sept., 1672," '. 73 years. He came to Plymouth, probably in 1629 with his brother Josiah1, and was admitted freeman, 1 Jan. 1632-3. In 1640, he was chosen Surveyor in Town of Plymouth, but neglecting highways is fined ten shillings [Ply. Col. Rec.,II, p. 1]. He removed to Marshfield about 1641, having previously received agrant of land at that place, then called Green's Harbor, 5 Mar. 1637-8: "all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Green's Harbor, are granted to Kenelme Winslow and Love Brewster, to be divided betwixt them, provided that Kenelme Winslow have that part next adjoining to his brother Josias,upon the conditions the lands there are granted upon" [Plym. Col. Rec., I,78]. Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says: he "settledon a gentle eminence by the sea, near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South Rivers. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of persons now living(1854) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman." This homestead he gave to his second son, Nathaniel2, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm3, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm4, whom. Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph4, of Boston, which also involved his ruin. Other lands were granted to Kenelm1 Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 April, 1659, and received the 24th lot, a portion of which is still owned and occupied (1873) by Barnaby4 Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson "to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years." Mr. Winslow was styled "joiner," 6 Jan. 1633-4, when Samuel Jenney was indented to him as an apprentice; but he is elsewhere and generally called a "planter" and was somewhat engaged in the shipping interest. Besides serving his townsmen in minor offices, he was deputy, or representative, in the general court, 1642-44, and 1649-53, eight years.[Plym. Col. Rec.]There is, among different branches of his descendants, a tradition that he possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation.He m. June, 1634, Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams, of Plymouth.1 She survived him and d. at Marshfield, Mass., where she was buried 5 Dec. 1681, "being eighty-three years old." He d. 13 Sept. 1672, '. seventy-three, Salem, Mass., where he had gone on business [Hon. Luther Hatch, of Marshfield]. According to Rev. L. R. Paige, he died there "apparently after a long sickness; for in his will dated five weeks earlier, 8 Aug. 1672, he describes himself as 'being very sick and drawing nigh unto Death He may have been in Salem on a visit to Mrs. Elizabeth Corwin, [Curwen] daughter of his brother Edward1 Winslow, or perhaps, for the purpose of obtaining medical aid." Their children were:2. 1. KENELM, [6] b. abt. 1635; d. 11 Nov. 1715; m. Mercy Worden; m. 2d, Damaris (???).3. 2. ELEANOR or ELLEN, [18] b. abt. 1637; d. 27 Aug. 1676; m. Samuel Baker.4. 3. NATHANIEL, [27] b. abt. 1639; d. 1 Dec. 1719; m. Faith Miller.5. 4. JOB, [36] b. abt. 1641; d. 14 July, 1720; m. Ruth (???).
found on ancestry.com

Kenelm Winslow
Kenelm Winslow came to America with his brother, Josias, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, Maine, July of 1631. Other brothers had come earlier, John who came in the Fortune in 1621, and Edward and Gilbert who came in the Mayflower in 1620.
Kenelm was a carpenter and a cabinet maker and the official coffin maker of the colony. He was the designer and maker of fine furniture, many pieces of which have been preserved in the Metropolitan and other museums.
Kenelm Winslow's will, dated 8 August 1672, proved 5 July 1673, named is four children, his grandchild Kenelm Baker, and asked his wife to give Mary Adams, child of James Adams an equal share of his personal property with the rest of his grandchildren. James Adams was Kenelm Winslow's wife's former husband who had died before Kenelm married her.
Kenelm and his wife Ellen(----)Newton Adams Winslow had four children.
* Kenelm, b. 1635; m. Mercy ---
* Ellen, b. 1637; m. Samuel Baker
*Nathaniel, b. 1639; m. Faith Miller
* Job, b. 1641
found on ancestry.com

MAYFLOWER CONNECTION
His brothers, Edward and Gilbert, were on the Mayflower.
found on ancestry.com

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