Tuesday, July 12, 2011

PETER WORDEN 1609-1680

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of Abigail Farr (Snow), daughter of Mercy Winslow (Farr), daughter of Thomas Winslow, son of Samuel Winslow, daughter of Mercy Worden (Winslow), daughter of Peter Worden.]

Peter Worden Headstone, East Dennis, Barnstable County, Massachusetts
mckane84added this on 3 May 2010
Category Type: Headstone
Headstone Details
Cemetery name: Worden Cemetery
Name on headstone: Peter Worden
Birth: 1609
Death: 1680



Peter Worden headstone




Worden Cemetery plaque
21 May 2011, Dennis, Massachusetts



Peter Worden
From Hal Bradley files 18sep051. Eastwood, Eric Kingman, The Worden Family: An Account of Some of the Descendants of Peter Worden of Yarmouth, Massachusetts (Microreproduction of original published: Pittsburgh, PA.: E.K. Eastwood, 1951. Film #973,025 Item 12.), p. 2, Family History Library.2. Savage, James, A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, showing three generations of those who came before 1692 (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1860-62.), 1:302, Los Angeles Public Library, 929.274 S264.3. Savage, J., Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, 4:651.4. Roberts, Gary Boyd, The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004.), p. 418, Family History Library, 273 D2rrd.
INFORMATION:Inherited lands of his father in area of Yarmouth, MA and later moved to east part of to wn then known as SeSuet (Dennis,MA?). Died at age 72.(from Daniel Hogan, see sources)PETER WORDEN, the son of Peter Worden and Margaret (Grice) Wall, was born in 1609 in Clayton- le-Woods,Lancashire, England. he died in 1681 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts. He married Mary in England . She died about 1681.Peter Worden was first recorded in New England on 02 June 1640. In 1643 he and fifty-one other men of the Yarmouth Company, all sixteen to twenty year old males capable of performing military duties, were directed to establish a place of defense against sudden assault. On 05 March 1667, he was fined 10 shillings for causing a disturbance at the meeting house at Yarmouth on the Lord's Day. The disturbance consisted of sitting in a corner of the meeting house and conversing in a low tone during the service. On 05 April 1669, he bought a parcel of land from William Twing of Eastham, which he transferred to his son-in-law Kenelem on the same day- -apparently as a dower for his daughter Mercy. Peter Worden was assessed a war tax (King Philip's War) of 8 pounds, 2 shillings, 3 pence in 1676--one of the largest in the Town.
Peter Worden's will, dated 09 January 1680 with a codicil dated 29 July 1680, was proved on 0 3 March 1681. His only son, Samuel, was named executor. The will is lengthy and detailed. hi s wife, Mary, survived him by six years. Her will is dated 06 March 1686. She left her India n sqauw servant to her son, Samuel. She died on 25 March 1687 in Yarmouth. Both Peter worden and his wife, Mary, are buried in the Worden Cemetery in the Town of Dennis on Cape Cod (formerly the east end of Old Yarmouth).
found on ancestry.com


Details of the Peter Worden headstone
The wide view shows three fieldstones flush to the ground lined up with the plaque. This suggests the fieldstones might be the original grave markers from the 1600's but this interpretation is open to question. Source: http://www.capecodgravestones.com/denpixweb/word39dw.html
Headstone Details
Cemetery name
Werden/Worden Cemetery 
Name on headstone
Peter Worden, Peter Worden, Mary Worden 
found on ancestry.com

Bio
PETER WORDEN, the son of Peter Worden and Margaret (Grice) Wall, was born in 1609 in Clayton-le-Woods, Lancashire, England. he died in 1681 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts. He married Mary in England. She died about 1681.
Peter Worden was first recorded in New England on 02 June 1640. In 1643 he and fifty-one other men of the Yarmouth Company, all sixteen to twenty year old males capable of performing military duties, were directed to establish a place of defense against sudden assault. On 05 March 1667, he was fined 10 shillings for causing a disturbance at the meeting house at Yarmouth on the Lord's Day. The disturbance consisted of sitting in a corner of the meeting house and conversing in a low tone during the service. On 05 April 1669, he bought a parcel of land from William Twing of Eastham, which he transferred to his son-in-law Kenelem on the same day--apparently as a dower for his daughter Mercy. Peter Worden was assessed a war tax (King Philip's War) of 8 pounds, 2 shillings, 3 pence in 1676--one of the largest in the Town.
Peter Worden's will, dated 09 January 1680 with a codicil dated 29 July 1680, was proved on 03 March 1681. His only son, Samuel, was named executor. The will is lengthy and detailed. his wife, Mary, survived him by six years. Her will is dated 06 March 1686. She left her Indian sqauw servant to her son, Samuel. She died on 25 March 1687 in Yarmouth. Both Peter worden and his wife, Mary, are buried in the Worden Cemetery in the Town of Dennis on Cape Cod (formerly the east end of Old Yarmouth).
found on ancestry.com

Will of Peter Worden
1681 , Plymouth Colony
Peter Worden (M)b. circa 1609, d. circa 1681Pedigree
Appears on charts: Descendant Chart for Peter WordenReference=2182
Peter was born circa 1609 at prob. England. 1 He was the son of Peter Worden and Margaret Grice. He married Mary (Winslow or Sears ?) on 9 February 1639 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. 2 Peter Worden left a will circa 1681 at Yarmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts; Peter II’s will Will probated 3 March 1681I Peter Worden of the Towne of Yarmouth in the Collonie of New Plymouth in New England in America about seaventy one years of age being weak in body yett in perfect memory doe make this my last will and testament.Firstly. I bequeath my soule to God that gave it and my body to the earth to be decently buryed when Gods time is to remove mee out of this world by death. Secondly. I make my son Samuell Worden my whole and sole executor to whom I give all my lands upon the neck called Equinett (?) necke with all the priviledges therto belonging to him and his heires and assignes forever with eight acrees of land att the south sea, to the said necke soe likewise.I give to my son Samuell Worden all my housing and land that I now live upon after his mothers decease both upland and marsh and orchyard and the land I bought to Mr. Allin, with all other lands due to mee from the Towne not yett layed out or from the Country as procured by the late warr with the Indians.Soe likewise I give to my son Samuell my best bedsteed and my trundle bedsteed.Thirdly. I give to my daughter Martha the wife of Joseph Severns a peece of marsh about three acrees be it more or lesse lying att the head of the Marsh above John Burgis his ditch, during her naturall life and after I give it to my son Samuell Worden to whom I likewise give all the cattle that hee hath bine possessed of by mee excepting two oxen.Fourthly. I give to my loveing wife Mary Worden the proffitts and improvements of my housing and lands and orchyards that I now live upon during her naturall life, both upland and marsh with the land I bought of Mr. Allin and all my household goods and cattle for her support during her life and my will is that what of my goods and cattle are left after my wife dies shalbe equally divided betwix my three daughters Mary, Marcye and Martha.Fifthly. I give to my son Samuell Worden all my estate in old England both land and other estate that came by my wife.Sixthly. I give to my daughter Mary the wife of John Burgis, the one halfe of my forty acres of upland at the head of the lotts to her, her heires and assigns forever.Seventhly. I give to my daughter Martha the wife of Joseph Severens all the cattle and goods, shee is alreddy possessed of my mee with one cow more att my decease and after her decease my will is that what of them are left shall fall to her two daughters now living.Lastly. I give to my son Samuell Worden my Chist and my cloak.Peter Wordenand a sealSigned and sealed before us this 9th day of January 1679John Freeman seniorSilas SardsThis 29th day of July 1680 I Peter Worden yett remaining in perfect memory though weake in body doe add this to my will as a further explanation.Firstly that my wife have att her owne disposall what ever she can raise of my land and cattle in the improvement of them, during her life, for her support and if there be any overpluss, to dispose of it to my children as shee shall see need.Whereas I have in my will given to my son Samuell all the cattle that hee hath bin possessed of by mee, excepting two oxen my will is that as my son Samuell hath them principally for to do the worke of family plowing and carting ec. so likewise that hee keepeth three steers more of my cattle, and when he hath brought two of them to work suitable to supply the rome of those above said two oxen. Then I give one of the old oxen to my wife and the other to my son Samuell, and the third steer my son Samuell shall keep to the halves, hee to have one halfe and his Mother the other half.and my will is that my son Samuell still breake other of my steers during my wifes life to be in Reddynes to doe the worke as above said, and att my wifes decease my will is that the two oxen that be then in Improvement shall Goe to my son Samuell with the house and land that my wife liveth on.likewise I give to my son Samuell my Gun and all my takleing for plowing and Carting and husbandry after my wifes decease and my son Samuel is to provide his Mother with fier wood dureing her life and likewise to provide hay for my Cattle during his Mothers life that is to say To Gett the hay mowed and made and Stacked and have the oxen and Cart in a Reddynes for that end the stocke of Cattle to pay for the geting of theire hay excepting Cart and oxen for draught. further whereas my son Kanelme Winslow oweth mee forty shillings I Give him twenty shillings of it, and whereas my son John Burge oweth mee thirty shillings I give him twenty shillings of it, and likewise I give my Indian servant to my son Samuell after my wife decease.as Witness my hand and seale the day and yeer above saidPeter Worden andasealeMemorandum I except one Cow and Calfe that I have in Samuells hand.Signed and sealed in the presence of usJohn Freeman. AssistantSilas Saers.Peter died circa 1681 at Yarmouth, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
Children of Peter Worden and Mary (Winslow or Sears ?):
Mary Worden + b. 1639, d. 1723 Mercy Worden d. 1688 Martha Worden b. 1643, d. 1725 Samuel Worden b. c 1645, d. 13 Sep 1715
Citations
[S163] NEHGR Volume IV, (1850). [S170] NE Marriages Prior, Torrey, Clarence A. , pg 779
found on ancestry.com

Peter Worden the Elder and the Younger
The name Worden (spelled Werden in ancient times) is a topographical name. It came from the fording place on the brook that forms the boundary between the Towns of Clayton and Leyland, Lancashire, England.
This account of one line of descent from Peter Worden, who founded this line of the Worden family in America, is based on the following sources:
Schunke, Marjorie W., A manuscript entitled "The Worden Family in Rhode Island."
Bahn, Gilbert S., Oliver Norton Worden's Family. (An unpublished book).
Worden, Oliver Norton, Some Records of Persons by the Name of Worden.
Worden, Mrs. Pat, Wordens Past. A quarterly newsletter (required reading for researchers interested in the Worden family).
In this account Amos Worden (5th Generation) is assumed to be the father of Thomas Worden because he is the only Worden in time and place capable of the act. This agrees with Bahn's latest conclusions (not those voiced in his unpublished book) but remains to be proven. Regardless, Thomas Worden is still the great grandson of (Dr.) Samuel Worden, and the line of descent is basically correct.
The Worden family were occupying land in the Town of Clayton (now Clayton-le-Woods) Lancashire, England as early as 1190, according to Place Names of Lancashire, by Eilert Ekwall. TheCockersand Abbey land rental records indicate that Henry Werden was occupying land in the Town of Clayton in 1451. The earliest surviving Court Rolls of Clayton Manor (1574) contains the name William Werden and his son and heir, Robert Werden (William died that year). A William Werden was included in the Preston Guild Rolls of 1459, and Peter Werden and his son Peter Werden were on the Preston Guild Rolls as late as 1622. William Werden and his son Robert Werden were the grandfather and father of Peter Worden--the first of the Worden line in America.
"Worden Origins," by George L. Bolton, which can be found in Volume VII, No. 3, through Volume VIII, No. 2, of Wordens Past, presents detailed documentation of the early Wordens of Clayton-le-Woods and the origin of the Family Name. Although the name Werden was not listed among the principal gentry of County Palatine and the Duchy of Lancashire, it was included in the list of those "who have arms but not residences."
In a paper given on 22 and 23 April 1989 at Worden Hall, Worden Park, Leyland, England under the auspices of the University of Liverpool, George L. Bolton identifies the farm occupied by the Wordens as the parcel of land donated to the Cockersand Abbey by Gerald de Clayton between 1190 and 1210. In return the Cannons were to pray in perpetuity for the souls of the donors. Bolton states, "From the seventeenth century (and possibly before) to the nineteenth century the holding, with its farm house, was known as 'Werdens oth' Hole' or 'Werdens of the Sand Hole' because of its geological characteristics. By the turn of this century it had become Hole House Farm. The farm house, a nineteenth century rebuild, was demolished a few years ago for housing development." The Wordens rented the farm from the Cockersand Abbey for twelve pence per annum. The Abbey was dissolved about 1540. Junction 28 of the great North-South Motorway falls neatly within the boundary of the farm, although many of the streams which bounded the farm are now buried in pipes.


PETER WORDEN, the son of Robert Worden (b. 1534, d. 1580) and Isabel Worthington, was born about 1576 in Clayton-le-Woods, Lancashire, England during the reigh of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 to 1603). He died in February 1639 at Yarmouth, Massachusetts. He was the first of the English to die in Yarmouth. He married Margaret Grice, daughter of Thomas and Alice Grice, and widow of Anthony Wall, about 1603, according to a 1607 Palatine Chancery Court action (PRO-PL6/1, No. 37). She was born between 1566 and 1571, probably in Warrington, Lancashire. She died early in 1612. She had five children by her first husband, who died in 1601.
Peter Worden was listed as "Gentleman" in several documents, and he was a member of the Town Council of Preston, Lancashire, England, which is located about five miles from Clayton. He was a "Foreign (outsider) Burgess" in Preston, and he leased a shop in the Guild hall, located next to the Preston Market Place, on 01 October 1617. He was last recorded in Preston on 21 January 1629, when, according to the early archives of Preston Borough, he loaned 8 shillings to the Borough for a project concerned with common lands.
In 1630 the Plague, which had already ravaged London, struck Preston, and 1069 people out of a population of 3000 died within the year. Peter Worden, his son, and their families probably left Preston because of the plague, as did many of the other survivors, because he next appears in the American Colonies in the mid 1630s. He was probably one of those who came "On Their Perticulers" (not belonging to any general group of emigrants from England sharing a common sectarian religion--such as the Pilgrims.)
It is believed that Peter Worden was first in Lynn, Massachusetts before moving to Yarmouth in 1639. In The History of Old Yarmouth, by Charles F. Swift, is the following: "At the extreme easterly part of the Town, Peter Worden [sic] the elder and younger have established themselves, in spite of the opposition of some of their associates, and here the former died the first year of settlement."
Peter Worden's will was probated on 05 March 1639. It is the first will printed in the Plymouth Court Records. A copy of the will remains in the Barnstable Probate Court. In his will Peter Worden left most of his real and personal property in both England and America to his son, Peter Worden. Both he and his son are buried in the Worden Cemetery, overlooking Cape Cod Bay. The cemetery is located on the south side of Route 6A in the Town of Dennis near the border of the Town of Brewster. Diectly across Route 6A, in a pasture, is a small foundation said to be from the house of the elder Peter Worden. The barn in the pasture is said to be built on the original foundation of the house of his son, Peter Worden.
CHILDREN
1. Elizabeth,died in July 1635 in Kirkham, Lancashire. she had a child, John Lewis, Jr., out of wedlock, by John Lewis (a "King's Preacher" who "fledd out of the country"). She married Hugh Swansey.
2. Bridget, died 19 November 1628 in Preston, according to the Preston Parish records. She was not married.
3. Peter, born in 1609 in Clayton-le-Woods, died in 1681 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, married Mary in England.
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PETER WORDEN, the son of Peter Worden and Margaret (Grice) Wall, was born in 1609 in Clayton-le-Woods, Lancashire, England. he died in 1681 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts. He married Mary in England. She died about 1681.
Peter Worden was first recorded in New England on 02 June 1640. In 1643 he and fifty-one other men of the Yarmouth Company, all sixteen to twenty year old males capable of performing military duties, were directed to establish a place of defense against sudden assault. On 05 March 1667, he was fined 10 shillings for causing a disturbance at the meeting house at Yarmouth on the Lord's Day. The disturbance consisted of sitting in a corner of the meeting house and conversing in a low tone during the service. On 05 April 1669, he bought a parcel of land from William Twing of Eastham, which he transferred to his son-in-law Kenelem on the same day--apparently as a dower for his daughter Mercy. Peter Worden was assessed a war tax (King Philip's War) of 8 pounds, 2 shillings, 3 pence in 1676--one of the largest in the Town.
Peter Worden's will, dated 09 January 1680 with a codicil dated 29 July 1680, was proved on 03 March 1681. His only son, Samuel, was named executor. The will is lengthy and detailed. his wife, Mary, survived him by six years. Her will is dated 06 March 1686. She left her Indian sqauw servant to her son, Samuel. She died on 25 March 1687 in Yarmouth. Both Peter worden and his wife, Mary, are buried in the Worden Cemetery in the Town of Dennis on Cape Cod (formerly the east end of Old Yarmouth).
CHILDREN
1. Mary, born in 1639 in Yarmouth, died in 1723 in Yarmouth, buried in the Worden Cemetery on Cape Cod, married John Burge on 08 September 1657 in Yarmouth.
2. Mercy, born 1641 in Yarmouth, died 22 September 1688 in Yarmouth, buried in the Worden Cemetery on Cape Cod, married Kenelem Winslow, 2nd., on 23 September 1667.
3. Martha, born about 1643 in Yarmouth, died in 1725, married Joseph Severance.
4. Samuel, born about 1646 in Barnstable (now East Dennis), died 26 August 1716 in Stonington, Connecticut, buried in Wequetequoc Cemetery in Stonington, married Hopestill Holley.
5. , a daughter born on 10 February 1648.
found on ancestry.com

Peter Worden/Werden notes
Peter Werden II [1609-1680]
The first official record we have of Peter Worden II is in the Plymouth Court Record, Volume 1, page 156, on the 2nd of June in 1640. It pertains to the granting of a warrant to attach and divide the goods of one Phillip Woodall.
In 1643, Peter II and fifty-one others of Yarmouth are enrolled with those required "to provide a place of defence against sudden assult." Between 1643 and 1658, he was prominent in all public affairs and was repeatedly named as juror. He sold twelve acres in the West Field to Robert Dennis.
In 1651, he was appointed on the Grand Jury and was fined for not serving. He was opposed to the prevailing order of things and in 1667 was fined for creating a disturbance in the meeting house on the Lord's Day, which consisted in speaking his mind audibly about theological matters. The fine being ten shillings to the use of the colony, Plymouth Court Records, Volume 3/4.
In 1675, Gov. Josiah Winslow of Plymouth led the trainbands against the Narragansett Indians and in 1676, King Phillip (Narrangansett Chief) was slain. The war tax of 1676 was very burdensome and Peter's was one of the largest, 8 pounds 2 shilling 3 d.
Peter's Will is dated January 9, 1680 and proved March 3, 1681.
Peter was buried beside his father on his own land. To quote Oliver Newton Worden in 1888, "The graveyard lies on a gentle elevation of the highway, sloping northward, with a fine view of Cape Cod Bay and the town to the north east."
His wife, Mary, survived him by six years. Her will is dated March 6, 1686 and is to be found in the "Mayflower Descendents" Volume 3, Page 201, and the Barnstable County probate records.
found on ancestry.com

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