Tuesday, July 12, 2011

WILLIAM WALTON 1605-1668

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of Abigail Farr (Snow), daughter of Mercy Winslow (Farr), daughter of Rebecca Ewer (Winslow), daughter of Rebecca Conant (Ewer), daughter of Nathaniel Conant, son of Elizabeth Walton (Conant), daughter of William Walton.]






Old Burial Hill, Marblehead, Ma






Old Burial Hill











Old Burial Hill














Rev William Walton of Marblehead per Savage
WILLIAM, Marblehead 1639, had been bred at Emanuel Coll. Cambridge, where he took his degr. 1621 and 1625, and was, no doubt, ord. and serv. at Seaton, Co. Devon, where it is kn. that sev.of [[405]] his ch. were b. came in some sh. earlier than his common. been thot. at least drew for houselot at Hingham, 18 Sept. 1635, and was freem. 3 Mar. foll. was but few yrs. at H. prob. longer at M. certain. in 1648, perhaps at Lynn a short time a. 1642, and may have taught for most of his latter yrs. part of ea. season, perhaps at Manchester, to wh,. he was activ. as a propr. of Jeffery's cove, in bring. the governm. to gr. incorp. 1645, and d. in autum 1668; inv. of his est. was tak. 23 Nov. of this yr. and he had allowance for his min. serv. up to that time at Marblehead. His w. was Elizabeth ch. b. in Eng. were, as is said, John, 6 Apr. 1627; Elizabeth 27 Oct. 1629; Martha, 26 Apr. 1632; and at H. was Nathaniel, 3 Mar. 1636; and at M. were Samuel, 5, bapt. 20 June 1639; Josiah 20 Dec. 1640, bapt. 2 Jan. foll.; and Mary, 14, bapt. 26 May 1644. Elizabeth m. a Conant; Martha m. a Munjoy, perhaps Walter; and Mary m.Robert Bartlett. Mather spelt this, in his list of min. of the first classis, Magn. III. 3, Waltham, and his authority (suppos. he must sometimes be right) I prefereed to Johnsons's in my note to Winthrop I. 169, for wh. Dr. Farmer admin, gentle rebuke. Increase Mather relat. in Remark. Providence. the d. of Josiah by lightning, spells the name correctly, as I now have.
found on ancestry.com

William Walton - 2 Stories
ID: I103068411
Name: (Rev) William WALTON
Given Name: (Rev) William
Surname: Walton
Sex: M
Death: < November 9, 1688 in Marblehead, Essex, MA
Note:
He may have come from the parish of Wimborne St Giles in Dorset. Thereare entries in the parish register for a Walton family, but none forWilliam himself. That might be due to damage to the book. The Dorset Subsidies list of 1628 shows a William Walton in WimborneSt Giles, possibly this William's father. He was subscribed as deacon at Bristol, Sep 22, 1621. He served as vicar of Seaton from about 1626 and emigrated in 1636. He was named curate of Seaton and Beere on Mar 31, 1628. He was granted a house lot in Hingham on Sep 18, 1635. He was allowed the right of grazing 2 cows on the Marblehead common. He as known as "Mr" in Salem court records of Mar 31,1640.Death: NOV 1668 in Marblehead, MA of apoplexy.Burial: 9 NOV 1668 Marblehead, MA Marriage 1 Elizabeth COOKE
Married: April 10, 1627 in Dorcester, Dorset, EnglandChildren
Elizabeth WALTON b: October 27, 1629 in Seaton, Devonshire, Engand- here I did not copy the entire list, for some reason!
2nd story is notes found on Rev. William Walton

Notes for Rev. William WALTONAlumni report of Emanuel College, Cambridge states that he entered 18 Feb 1617 and got his BA in 1621 and his masters in 1625. It also indicates he was "of Somerset" and that he was a "sizer", one who financed his education by working part time. He "subscribed to the oath of Supremacy and XXXIX Articles in the Diocese of Bristol September, 1621" and was licensed to hold a Curacy on March 31, 1828" according to the "Somerset and Dorset Notes and Queries (vol 6, p. 136).In Hingham by 1635 - was among the 29 men who drew house lots and receive grants of land for pasture on 18 Sep 1635. There is an inlet near Hingham harbor known as Walton's Cove for at least 300 years that may have been the site of his land. Took the oath as a freeman there 3 Mar 1635/6. Moved to Marblehead before 1637 (when he's listed on a tax list) as the first pastor. He was granted land at Marblehead on 14 Nov 1638. When Marblehead became an independent town in 1649 (until then it was part of Salem), William was granted 40 pounds for his services as minister.407Savage's: WILLIAM, Marblehead 1639, had been bred at Emanuel Coll. Cambridge, where he took his degr. 1621 and 1625, and was, no doubt, ord. and serv. at Seaton, Co. Devon, where it is kn. that sev. of his ch. were b. came in some sh. earlier than his common. been thot. at least drew for houselot at Hingham, 18 Sept. 1635, and was freem. 3 Mar. foll. was but few yrs. at H. prob. longer at M. certain. in 1648, perhaps at Lynn a short time a. 1642, and may have taught for most of his latter yrs. part of ea. season, perhaps at Manchester, to wh,. he was activ. as a propr. of Jeffery's cove, in bring. the governm. to gr. incorp. 1645, and d. in autum 1668; inv. of his est. was tak. 23 Nov. of this yr. and he had allowance for his min. serv. up to that time at Marblehead.His w. was Elizabeth ch. b. in Eng. were, as is said, John, 6 Apr. 1627; Elizabeth 27 Oct. 1629; Martha, 26 Apr. 1632; and at H. was Nathaniel, 3 Mar. 1636; and at M. were Samuel, 5, bapt. 20 June 1639; Josiah 20 Dec. 1640, bapt. 2 Jan. foll.; and Mary, 14, bapt. 26 May 1644. Elizabeth m. a Conant; Martha m. a Munjoy, perhaps Walter; and Mary m. Robert Bartlett. Mather spelt this, in his list of min. of the first classis, Magn. III. 3, Waltham, and his authority (suppos. he must sometimes be right) I prefereed to Johnsons's in my note to Winthrop I. 169, for wh. Dr. Farmer admin, gentle rebuke. Increase Mather relat. in Remark. Providence. the d. of Josiah by lightning, spells the name correctly, as I now have.
anniewalton51added this on 9 Sep 2010
found on ancestry.com

This is interesting!
ORIGIN OF WILLIAM WALTON. M.A.-In The REGISTER for October 1959, pp, 319,
320, a note was published concerning the supposed origin of William Walton, first
minister in Marblehead, Mass. The undersigned isa grateful to Mr. F. C. Warner of North
Amherst. Mass., for pointing out that Mrs. Frances Rose-Troup's splendid work, "John
White, the Patriarch of Dorchester. Dorset, and the Founder of Massachusetts", published
in 1930, reveals that Walton's wife was Elizabeth Cooke (not Cake), niece of Rev. John
White. rector of Holy Trinity, Dorchester, the aforesaid founder of Massachusetts. At
page 264 of her book Mrs. Rose-Troup quotes from "Calendar of State Papers, Charles
I", a letter, dated 8 Aug. 1632, from Sir Walter Erle of Charborough, Dorset, addressed to
the aforesaid Rev. John White, stating "when Mr. Walton, your kinsman and my friend,
was here I made so bold as to ask him what became of the project of bringing in the man
that heretofore styled himself 'the King's conformable clerk' to succeed him at Seaton".
Walton had been since 1628 curate in Seaton, Devon. whence he removed about 1635
New England. His wife's surname, shown in the printed register of Holy Trinity as
"Cake", was undoubtedly Coke (a variation then used for Cooke) in the written entry. She
was, we know, married in the church of which her uncle, John White. was rector. The
aforesaid letter of 1632. revealing that Rev. William Walton was a friend of Sir Walter
Erle, and that Walton had been in Charborough, furnishes evidence of a sort confirming
the supposition that Walton came originally from Wimborne St. Giles. Dorset, since Sir
Walter descended from the family of Plecie of that place (Vis. Dorset, Harl. publication,
vol. 20. p. 37; ibid., addendum, p. 21). a town only about ten miles from Charborough,
The latter lies near the route one would have travelled going from Seaton. Devon, to
Wimborne St. Giles, Dorset.
At pages 404-406 of her book, Mrs. Rose-Troup indicates the ancestry of Mrs. Walton's
mother, which is:
I. Mark White of Timsbury and Leckford, Hants., "descended of a younger brother of
White of Southwick", died about 1529; had
II. John White of Timsbury, buried 1579/80; married Mildred Weston, buried in 1567;
had
III. John White of Stanton St. John. Oxon, died by September 1618; married Isabel
daughter of John Bawle (not Rawle as shown in D.N.B.) of Lichfield, sister of Henry
Bawle, D.D., archdeacon of Chichester. She was living in 1601. They had, inter alia:
a. John White, patriarch of Dorchester and founder of Massachuserts, born circa 1575,
died in 1648 (father of Josiah).
b. Martha White, married William Cooke of Stratton. They had
William. baptized in 1609; Elizabeth, married William Walton; Susanna; Mary; and
Nathaniel.
It is notable that the Rev. William Wallon and Elizabeth his wife had, inter alia, children
named John, Josiah. Martha and Nathaniel. names identified with the aforesaid White and
Cooke families.
The statement relative to Mark White, "descended of a younger brother of White of
had
III. John White of Stanton St. John. Oxon, died by September 1618; married Isabel,
daughter of John Bawle (not Rawle as shown in D.N.B.) of Lichfield, sister of Henry
Bawle, D.D., archdeacon of Chichester. She was living in 1601. They had, inter alia:
a. John White, patriarch of Dorchester and founder of Massachuserts, born circa 1575,
died in 1648 (father of Josiah).
b. Martha White, married William Cooke of Stratton. They had:
William. baptized in 1609; Elizabeth, married William Walton; Susanna; Mary; and
Nathaniel.
It is notable that the Rev. William Wallon and Elizabeth his wife had, inter alia, children
named John, Josiah. Martha and Nathaniel. names identified with the aforesaid White and
Cooke families.
The statement relative to Mark White, "descended of a younger brother of White of
Southwick", is not, it seems, quite correct. It is taken from the Visitation of Hampshire
been seated in Southwick, Hants., before 1538 (V. C. H., Hants., II, 168; ibid., III. 162).
These Whites appear to have originated in Farnham, Surrey (Manning and Bray's
"Surrey". III, 177; cf. Hutchins' Dorset. IV. 154; cf. D. N. B., sub White, Jobn (1510·
1560) and White, John (1575-1648). and sources there cited.
found on ancestry.com

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Rev William Walton
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Edit Learn about sponsoring this memorial...Birth: Sep. 13, 1605z-Devonshire, EnglandDeath: Nov. 6, 1668MarbleheadEssex CountyMassachusetts, USAThis informative bio was posted by the initial Memorialist:"Rev. William WALTON was born on 13 Sep 1605 in Seaton, Devonshire, England. He died on 6 Nov 1668 in Marblehead, Essex Co., Massachusetts. He was a Minister. He married Elizabeth Cooke, daughter of William and Martha (White) Cooke of Stratton, England. William Walton died of apoplexy 9 November 1668 at Marblehead. It is believed his resting place is "Ould Burial Hill. The last official record of Elizabeth was in 1670. She died in 1682 and the final settlement of the property was made 29 March 1685." Additional biographical information about William Walton, here follows:William Walton [. . .] was born in Devonshire, England. He attended Emmanuel College, Cambridge (degrees in 1621 and 1625) and may have become a separatist minister soon after he left the university. A nineteenth century source (James Savage) states that William Walton was "no doubt ordained" and served at Seaton in Devon. But our source does not specifically state that Walton served as clergy there. [. . .]William and Elizabeth Walton had nine children. The Waltons sailed to Massachusetts with other Puritans in what many historians term the "Great Migration" (approximately 1620 – 1634). This movement of several thousand included some propertied families as well as at least a handful of generally well educated male heads of households. William and Elizabeth Walton were among these promising early settlers.[. . .]If William Walton was ordained in England, he seems to have pursued other activities in Hingham, Lynn, Manchester and Marblehead, MA, where he was living when he died in 1668. James Savage, our nineteenth century source (everyone's source) who says he checked the documents, stated that Walton received a ministerial allowance in Marblehead. Savage speculates that Walton may have been employed as a teacher during winter months. Savage found William Walton the proprietor of an establishment in Manchester called Jeffery's Cove. These surmises indicate that William and Elizabeth arrived in America without great wealth. (What kinds of activities did the Puritans permit to take place in the Cove?)Papers filed in probate court in Marblehead, which undertook to settle his intestate property, refer to William as "Mr" Walton and make no references that might infer clerical activities. (But "Mr" was a generally applicable term.) His widow, Elizabeth, was permitted to administer her husband's affairs and was instructed by the court to keep the estate together during her life and to pay William's debts. After her death, Elizabeth Walton's son, Samuel, together with his brothers and sisters, returned to court in 1683 to affirm that the family had reached agreement among themselves as to the disposition of their parents' possessions. Son Samuel Walton was given a cow and leased another from his siblings, to be paid for from his part of the residue of the estate.[. . .]_________This brief biography has been taken from Volume I of a book of family history entitled ALL OF THE ABOVE I, by Richard Baldwin Cook. For additional information, visit the contributor profile, #47181028._________DID WILLIAM WALTON COMMEND MEN TO GODbyRichard Baldwin Cook(copyright 2010)Did William Walton commend men to God?We check old records which uncertain be.Faintest paths in England show he trodRoutes of unmastered Pilgrims, to be free.With two degrees from Cambridge in his cap,Will Walton in a Seaton pastorate.No sign there of ejection or mishap,Our William yet migrated from that state.Arrived in Boston, 1635With pinched pocketbook. William always stroveFor funds, that Lizbeth and their nine might thrive.Will forsook church duties, ran Jeffreys Cove. Pilgrims censured conduct, cite Holy Writ. What business at the Cove did they permit? Family links: Children: Elizabeth Walton Conant (1629 - 1674)* Samuel Walton (1639 - 1717)* Spouse: Elizabeth Cooke Walton (1602 - 1682)* *Point here for explanation Burial:Old Burial Hill Cemetery MarbleheadEssex CountyMassachusetts, USA Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Maintained by: Richard Baldwin CookOriginally Created by: S. PattersonRecord added: Sep 20, 2008 Find A Grave Memorial# 29952166Cemetery PhotoAdded by: The Guardian Photos may be scaled.Click on image for full size.My 8th great-grandfather.- Apple Added: Sep. 19, 2010
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The Walton Family in America
The Walton Family in America

The earliest information we have on this family is nearly four centuries old. The Reverend William Walton was born in 1600 and died in 1668. In an alumni report of Emanuel College, Cambridge, England it is noted that William Walton entered that institution on February 18, 1617 and graduated with a B.A. degree in 1621. He was awarded an M.A. degree in 1625. Records show that he was "probably of Somerset", England. Another source, however, unsubstantiated, suggest Essex County. The alumni records show that he entered college as a "sizer", that is, one who works part time to finance his education.

William married Elizabeth Cooke, daughter of William and Martha (White) Cooke of Stratton, England, who became our pioneer ancestress. The date of her birth is not known but she died in 1682. Her maternal uncle, the Reverend John White, was Patriarch of Dorchester, Dorset, England, and became founder of Dorchester,Massachusetts in America.

Records show that William and Elizabeth were among the first settlers of Hingham (then known as Barecove, Mass.) They were also among the 29 men who, with Reverend Peter Hobart, and his little band of colonists, drew house lots and received grants of land for pasture and tillage in the first distribution of lots in Hingham on Sept. 18, 1635. That date establishes the beginning of the Walton family in America. That area is now a part of Melville Gardens at Downer's Landing. It is a sunny nook sloping down to the shore and, for more than three hundred years, has born the name of Walton's Cove. The bell tower of the old Ship Church still stands. It bears the date of 1631,

The family moved to Marblehead, Mass., one of the oldest settlements in the colony, and most primitive, in 1637. It was in need of a minister. William Walton was the first missionary and he served as teacher and preacher for the next thirty years. The houses were rude log huts with thatched roofs in which sputtering pine knots were the chief source of light. Cooking was done on spits, in kettles hung on a crane in the fireplace or in fireplace ovens. There was no magistrate - not even a constable to enforce the law. For further information read "Walton History" by Hattie Walton Heninger. Court records reveal that much of the turbulence of which Marblehead had been accused was due to the prevalent use of rum which was made from foreign molasses imported by the colonies.

The congregational form of church government was established by law in Mass. in 1651. Their little chapel, though built of rough-hewn logs, was a sacred edifice dedicated to the worship of God. The people met there on the Sabbath day, the men sitting at the head of the pews with muskets loaded in the event of an Indian attack.

William Walton died of apoplexy (stroke) November 9, 1668 at Marblehead. He died intestate and under the court's appointment, Elizabeth administered his estate with the approval of the children. It is believed his resting place is "Ould Burial Hill." Elizabeth died in 1682.

Samuel Walton (1639-1717), son of William Walton and Elizabeth Cooke Walton was born June 5, 1639 at Marblehead, Mass. He died in 1717 and was buried at Reading, Mass. He married Sarah Maverick who was born at Chelsea, Mass. and died at Reading, June 10, 1714. She was the daughter of Elias and Ann Harris Maverick.

Samuel was among fourteen householders who took the oath of allegiance Dec. 28, 1667. He served in civic and church activities as a "tithing man" (tax collector), constable and selectman. He was a farmer and also a mariner who found the fishing business highly competitive. After the death of hisparents and the settlement of his father’s estate, he inherited the place of his birth where all his children were later born.

Samuel Walton (1684-1753), son of Samuel Walton and Sarah Maverick Walton, was born at Marblehead in 1684. He was called "The miller of Hampton Falls". On December 22, 1702 he married Hannah Leach, daughter of John and Mary Leach. They moved to Reading where the births of their children are recorded. Samuel's name was on the proprietor's list when the town was incorporated by Charter on November 25, 1753. Samuel had a grist mill in North Hampton. He died November 9, 1753 and was buried at Hampton Falls. His wife Hannah, preceded him in death by six years and was buried at Reading.

Samuel Walton (1705-1750), son of Samuel Walton and Hannah each, was born in Reading, Mass. October 7, 1705. He married Rebecca Davis, on March 6, 1729, daughter of Joshua and Rebecca Pierce Davis. They settled in Lynn, Essex County, Mass. A few years after their marriage, an important event occurred in their lives. It all came about through the governor of Massachusetts bestowing grants of land on the legal heirs, male and female, of soldiers who had fought in King Phillips war. (“King Philip's War, sometimes called Metacom's War or Metacom's Rebellion, was an armed conflict between Native American inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Native American allies from 1675–1676. The war is named after the main leader of the Native American side, Metacomet, Metacom, or Pometacom, known to the English as "King Philip." wikipedia.)These grants were in fulfillment of a proclamation made to soldiers on Dedham Plain in the name of the government. It was said that "if they played the man, took the fort and drove the enemy out of Narragansett, they should have a gratuity of land besides their wages." Under that proclamation, Samuel's legal heirship came through his mother, Hannah, the granddaughter of John Leach Sr., who was a soldier in that deadly struggle.

The grant was called Narragansett No. 3 or Souhegan West, until it was incorporated as Amherst, New Hampshire County, Mass. Samuel and Rebecca went with their children, to face an uncertain future in an unbroken wilderness. The land, densely forested, through which the Souhegan River flows on a meandering way to join the Merrimac, was rich and fertile. It was, however, lonely and unsettled. The wives with their husbands and children helped to clear the land of trees, brush and stumps to make it habitable. Their homes, historians tell us, were the first in Amherst. Their son Benjamin was one of the first white children born in Amherst. They later moved to the east near Baboosuck Pond. The reason for this scattering out and moving to "other parts" was that they now felt it unnecessary to live in the fort, due to the promise of the government that they would be protected from attacks by the Indians - a promise that was never kept. Samuel died sometime before February 16, 1750. Through his widow, his estate was administered by his son Samuel, who died before 1760.
found on ancestry.com

Notes on Rev. Walton
Notes for Rev. William WALTONAlumni report of Emanuel College, Cambridge states that he entered 18 Feb 1617 and got his BA in 1621 and his masters in 1625. It also indicates he was "of Somerset" and that he was a "sizer", one who financed his education by working part time. He "subscribed to the oath of Supremacy and XXXIX Articles in the Diocese of Bristol September, 1621" and was licensed to hold a Curacy on March 31, 1828" according to the "Somerset and Dorset Notes and Queries (vol 6, p. 136).In Hingham by 1635 - was among the 29 men who drew house lots and receive grants of land for pasture on 18 Sep 1635. There is an inlet near Hingham harbor known as Walton's Cove for at least 300 years that may have been the site of his land. Took the oath as a freeman there 3 Mar 1635/6. Moved to Marblehead before 1637 (when he's listed on a tax list) as the first pastor. He was granted land at Marblehead on 14 Nov 1638. When Marblehead became an independent town in 1649 (until then it was part of Salem), William was granted 40 pounds for his services as minister.
found on ancestry.com

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