Saturday, July 30, 2011

RICHARD KIMBALL 1595-1675

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Sarah Sawyer Hastings (Snow), daughter of Salome Burt (Hastings), daughter of Enos Burt, son of Martha Severence (Burt), daughter of Ebenezer Severence, son of John Severence, son of Abigail Kimball (Severence), daughter of Richard Kimball.]






Photo: wheelwright-1 Category: Portrait Attached To: Richard Kimball (1595-1675)







St Nicholas Church, Rattlesden, Suffolk, England

The hills roll in from the west, and make gentle folds in the countryside between Stowmarket and Hadleigh. Some of the valleys are quite dramatic, and in one of the steepest sits the village of Rattlesden. Rattlesden is a large village in a wide parish, and in fact the parish contains several other settlements; one of them, Hightown Green, is bigger than many other Suffolk villages. But it is Rattlesden itself that contains the parish church, and what a dramatic setting! Half-timbered houses clamber the slopes either side of the splendidly named River Rat. On the south side they are particularly grand, and include a fine old pub. However, there is a jollier pub on the north side where the church is, and it was this one that was packed to the gunnels when we called in at 4pm on Easter Monday 2004. The churchyard drops dramatically away to the south-east. A steep path descends from the road above the graveyard giving a grand view of the building, and it doesn't take much to see that St Nicholas is a little unusual. Although the assemblage of nave, clerestory, aisles and chancel are familiar 15th century rebuildings in this prosperous area, the tower is a little out of the ordinary. Uncastellated, but with a little wooden spire, it was remodelled by Sir Arthur Blomfield in the later years of the 19th century. Replacing an earlier spire which had fallen, but avoiding Richard Phipson's psychedelic fantasies at nearby Woolpit and Great Finborough, he produced something much more austere, although in its way just as singular. The shortness of the spire create an effect a bit like a hat on the thin tower. Two clasping pencil-like buttresses rise on the west side, and the tower appears to lean into them, but this is perhaps just an optical illusion. The exterior took its present form in four stages. Firstly, the original nave was built in the 13th century, probably replacing a Saxon or Norman building. A hundred years later, the tower was added. Next, the dramatic remodelling occured in the 15th century, when the little church was transformed by the addition of Perpendicular aisles and a clerestory.


St. Nicholas Church, Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England













Plaque inside the Church of St. Nicholas, Rattlesden, Suffolk Co., England
















Immigrant Ancestors
Rattlesden, Suffolk County, EnglandWatertown, Middlesex County, MassachusettsIpswich, Essex County, Massachusetts
Rattlesden is a village in Suffolk in eastern England. St. Nicholas church dates from the 13th century. The village was a center of Puritanism in the 16th and 17th centuries.
The ship “Elizabeth” sailed from Ipswich England in April, 1634 with William Andrews, Master. On board were Richard and Ursula Kimball and their children, Ursula’s mother Martha Whatlock Scott and her brothers Roger and Thomas Scott. Humphrey and Bridget Bradstreet sailed on the same ship. They arrived in July at Boston.
Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott married in 1611 in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England. The oldest eight children were born in England.
The family immigrated to America in April, 1634 on the ship “Elizabeth.”
Henry Kimball was baptized on August 12, 1615. Abigail Kimball Severens was born before 1616. Elizabeth Kimball was born in 1621. Richard Kimball, Jr. was born in 1623. Mary Kimball Dutch was born in 1625. Martha Kimball Fowler was born in 1629. John Kimball was born in 1631. Thomas Kimball was born in 1633.
The family first settled in Watertown, Massachusetts. “The home lot of Richard Kimball was six acres on the Cambridge line, now in the city of Cambridge, near the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street.”
Sarah Kimball Allen was born in 1635.
They moved to Ipswich in about 1637. The town gave him a house lot and forty acres beyond the North river on February 23, 1637.
Benjamin Kimball was born in 1637. Caleb Kimball was born in 1639.
In September, 1649 the Essex Court admonished "Joseph Fowler [Martha Kimball’s husband], Thomas Cooke, Thomas Scott [a cousin], and two of ye sons of Richard Kimball [John and Thomas], for goeing into ye woods, shouting and singing, taking fire and liquors with them, all being at unseasonable time in ye night, occasioning yr. wives and some other to go out to them.“
Ursula died on March 1, 1659 and Richard married Margaret Cole Dow in 1661.
Richard died on June 22, 1675 in Ipswich.
found on ancestry.com


Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott
Richard Kimball was born about 1595. He may be the son of Henry Kembold and Sysley — of Hitcham, Suffolk, England. Richard married first Ursula Scott. Ursula was baptized 14 February 1598 in Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, the daughter of Henry Scott and Martha Whatlock. Richard and Ursula emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, sailing from Ipswich, England, in 1634 with seven of their children, Ursula’s mother and brother Thomas Scott and his family, and Henry Kemball (probably Richard’s brother) and his family. The Kimballs settled in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Richard became a freeman there in 1635 and a proprietor in 1636/7. The family moved to Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. Richard was a wheelwright. He married second Margaret Cole (widow Dow) 23 October 1661. Richard’s will was made 5 March 1674/5 and proved 28 September 1675. Richard died 22 June 1675 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts.
Richard and Ursula's children are:
1. Henry Kimball, (eldest son), baptized 12 Aug 1615 in Rattlesden, Suffolk, England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married 1) Mary Wyatt and 2) Elizabeth Gilbert (widow of William Rayner). 2. Abigail Kimball, possibly baptized 5 Nov 1617 (according to Walter Goodwin Davis), at Hitcham, Suffolk, England, married John Severance, died 17 Jun 1658 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts. 3. Elizabeth Kimball, born about 1621 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, living in 1675. 4. Richard Kimball, born about 1623 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married 1) Mary — and 2) Mary (widow of Charles Gott), 26 May 1676 in Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts. 5. Mary Kimball, born about 1625 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Robert Dutch. 6. Martha Kimball, born about 1629 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Joseph Fowler. 7. John Kimball, born about 1631 in England, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, married Mary Bradstreet, died 6 May 1698. 8. Thomas Kimball, born about 1633 in England, married Mary Smith, emigrated to New England aboard the Elizabeth, died (killed by Indians) 3 May 1676 in Bradford, Essex, Massachusetts, wife and five children weretaken captive but allowed to return home 13 Jun 1676. 9. Sarah Kimball, born in 1635 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, married Edward Allen 24 Nov 1658, died 12 Jun 1696. 10. Benjamin Kimball, married Mercy (or Mary) Hazeltine in Apr 1661, died 11 Jun 1695. 11. Caleb Kimball, married Anna (or Hannah) Hazeltine 7 Nov 1660, died (killed by Indians at the Battle of Bloody Brook) 18 Sep 1675 in Deerfield, Franklin, Massachusetts.
Sources: 1. Davis, Walter Goodwin, Massachusetts and Maine Familes in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966), Vol. II, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996. 2. Hoyt, David W., The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts, Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982. 3. Huffey, David (transcriber), Rattlesden (Suffolk, England) Baptisms—1559 to 1758 (from the Parish Register Transcripts), transcribed between 1987-1995. 4. Savage, James, A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Before 1692, Vols. 1 & 3, Boston, MA, 1860. 5. Ship's List of the Elizabeth, 1634 (H.M. State Paper Office/Public Records Office. Tepper, Michael (ed.), Passengers to America: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1977, pgs. 42-43, 45. Banks, Charles Edward, The Planters of the Commonwealth, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1961 (reprint), pgs. 117-121). 6. Post on the Massachusetts Bay Colony mailinglist (Ma-Bay-Colony), “Tid-a-bits: Burials of Ipswich’s “Ancient Burying Ground”—part 1” from Cynthia (NewEnglanders1620@samnet.net) to MA-BAY-COLONY-L@rootsweb.com, 14 June 2002, citing Essex County, Massachusetts court records. 7. Morrison, Leonard Allison & Sharples, Stephen Paschall, History of the Kimball Family in America from 1634-1897, Vol. 1, Boston: Damrell & Upham, 1897. 8. Will of Richard Kimball, (original on file in the probate office at Salem, Massachusetts), Ipswich Deeds, Vol. IV, p. 12. 9. Inventory of the Estate of Thomas Kimball of Ipswich (Salem Quarterly Court Records, vol 5, leaf 94; Essex County Quarterly Court Files, vol 25, leaf 124; Ipswich Quarterly Court records, vol 5, page 284.)
Kimball Richard Kimball was born about 1595, presumably in some parish near Rattlesden, co. Suffolk, England. The family of Kymbould, Kembold or Kemball was numerous at Hitcham near Rattlesden in the sixteenth century, but Richard Kimball’s baptism is not found in the parish register, nor is that of his brother Henry Kemball. It is only after its translation to New England that the family name became Kimball. Richard Kemball married Ursula Scott of Rattlesden about 1614 and they had a child baptized in her parish in 1615. Very probably their second child was that Abigail, daughter of Richard Kemball, baptized at Hitcham in 1617, but where the six younger children whom their parents brought to New England were baptized has not been discovered. When Richard and Ursula Kemball sailed for America in the Elizabeth of Ipswich in 1634 their home was stated to be Rattlesden. With them were Martha Scott, Ursula’s mother, Thomas Scott,, her brother, and his family, and Henry Kemball, Richard’s brother, and his family. The Scotts were Rattlesden people and Henry Kemball is also listed as from that village. On the list Richard’s age is given as thirty-nine, while the children were Henry, fifteen (probably a mistaken reading of eighteen), Elizabeth thirteen, Richard eleven, Mary nine, Martha five, John three, and the baby, Thomas, one. It was a heavy expense and no light responsibility to embark on a long voyage with such a brood. After they landed both of the Kemball families went to Watertown, where Richard Kemball was made a freeman on May 6, 1635, and where he was a proprietor in 1636/7. By the latter part of 1637, however, he had moved his family to Ipswich where he had been granted a house lot at the west end of the town. He was an Ipswich commoner in 1641 and a subscriber to the salary of the military commander, Major Denison, in 1648. His farm was in the northern part of the town near Prospect Hill. By trade he was a wheelwright. Either he or his son Richard, of Wenham, was on Essex county trial juries in 1658 and 1667, and grand juries of 1661, 1664, 1668 and 1669. He was seldom in legal difficulties, there being a record of a few suits of debt in which he was plaintiff or defendant and three or four actions of various types against Richard Shatswell, none of which produce information of interest. After the death of his wife Ursula, Kemball married on October 23, 1661, widow Margaret (Cole) Dow of Hampton. He died in Ipswich June 22, 1675, and she survived only until March 1 1675/6. Administration was granted to her sons Daniel Dow and Thomas Dow on March 4, 1675/6. There were £40 due her by her marriage contract.[1] Richard Kimball, sr., of Ipswich made his will on March 5, 1674/5, and it was proved September 28, 1675. He directed that his wife should live in his house, have the improvement of the land belonging thereto and the increase in the stock for a year after his decease. At the end of the year the £40 due her and the goods she brought to their marriage were to be paid to her. After that she was to have the parlor end of the house to live in, a part of the cellar, one cow, firewood and a quarter of the fruit of the orchard, but if she desired to move to her own house she was “to be sett in itt” by the executors and allowed 40 s. a year for life. The his eldest son Henry, £90. To his son Richard, £40. To his son John £20.. to his son Thomas, £25, and to his children £7 divided equally among them as they came of age. To his son Benjamin beside two oxen already given him, £25, and to his children £6 to be divided equally among them as they married or came of age. To his son Caleb, land known as Ting’s lot, land at Wattle’s neck, marsh known as Wiat’s marsh and working tools except two axes. To Caleb’s children, £14 to be divided equally as they married or came of age. To his son-in-law John Severance, £10. To his daughter Mary £10. To his daughter Sarah, £40, and to her children £7:10:0 as they married or came of age. Also to Sarah, the bed he lay on with its furnishings. To his wife’s children Thomas and Mary, 40s. each, and to Jeremiah, £15. To the two eldest daughters of Giles Cowes that he had by his first wife (the testator’s great-granddaughters) £8 to be equally divided when they reached sixteen. To his cousin Haniell Bosworth, £4. Executors: his sons Richard and John Kimball. Overseer: cousin Haniell Bosworth. Witnesses: Moses Pengry, sr., Aaron Pengry, sr. The homestead was worth £200 and there was a good stock of animals, utensils, furnishings and linen, the total value being £737.[2] Children: i. Henry, bapt. In Rattlesden Aug. 12, 1615; m. (1) Mary Wyatt; m. (2) Elizabeth, widow of William Rayner. ii. Abigail; possibly bapt. Nov. 5, 1617, at Hitcham, co. Suffolk. She was left in England when her family emigrated, possibly already married to John Severance, with whom she came to New England by 1636. iii. Elizabeth; d. before her father made his will, probably unmarried. iv. Richard; m. (1) Mary (Cooley?); m. Mary Gott, widow of Charles Gott. v. Mary; m. Robert Dutch. (See Dutch.) vi. Martha; m. Joseph Fowler. vii. John; m. Mary Bradstreet. viii. Thomas; m. Mary Smith; killed by Indians in Bradford May 3, 1676. ix. Sarah; m. Nov. 24, 1658, Edward Allen. x. Benjamin; m. Mercy Hazeltine. xi. Caleb; m. Nov. 7, 1660, Anna Hazeltine.
Source: Davis, Walter Goodwin, Massachusetts and Maine Familes in the Ancestry of Walter Goodwin Davis (1885-1966), Vol. II, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996.
Pages 223-4 1 Richard1 Kimball [Kemball or Kemble], of Watertown[3] and Ipswich, “wheelwright,” b. ab. 1595; m. 1st, Ursula Scott;[4] 2d, Oct. 23, 1661,Margaret Cole [wid. of (1) Henry1 Dow], who d. March 1, 1675-6 [Ip.]. He embarked from Ipswich, Eng., April, 1634, in the ship “Elizabeth;” rem. From Wat. To Ip. 1637 or ‘8; d. June 22, 1675; will March 5, 1674-5; Sep. 28, 1675. Children: I. Abigail,2 b. —; m. John1 Severance, of S. II. Henry,2 b. ab. 1615-9; m. 1st, Mary Wyatt; 2d, wid. Elizabeth (Gilbert) Rayner. III. Elizabeth,2 b. ab. 1621; liv. 1675, prob. unm. IV. Richard,2 b. ab. 1623; m. 1st, Mary —; 2d, Mary —. V. Mary,2 b. ab. 1625; m. Robert Dutch of Ip. VI. Martha,2 b. ab. 1629; m. (6) Joseph2 Fowler VII. John,2 b. ab. 1631; m. abt. 1655, Mary Bradstreet. VIII. Thomas,2 b. ab. 1633; m. Mary Smith. IX. Sarah,2 b. ab. 1635; m. Nov. 24, 1658[Ip.], Edward Allen of Ip. [p. 31]. X. Benjamin,2 b. ab. 1637; m. April 16, 1661, Mercy Hazeltine. XI. Caleb,2 b. ab. 1639; m. Nov. 7, 1660, Anna Hazeltine.
Source: Hoyt, David W., The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts, Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982.
Rattlesden Baptisms—1559 to 1758 08/12/1615 Kemball Henry Richard & Ursala 02/14/1598 Scoote Urslaye Henry & Martha
Source: Huffey, David (transcriber), Rattlesden (Suffolk, England) Baptisms—1559 to 1758 (from the Parish Register Transcripts), transcribed between 1987-1995.
found on ancestry.com


Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott
Immigrant Ancestors
Rattlesden, Suffolk County, EnglandWatertown, Middlesex County, MassachusettsIpswich, Essex County, Massachusetts
The ship “Elizabeth” sailed from Ipswich England in April, 1634 with William Andrews, Master. On board were Richard and Ursula Kimball and their children, Ursula’s mother Martha Whatlock Scott and her brothers Roger and Thomas Scott. Humphrey and Bridget Bradstreet sailed on the same ship. They arrived in July at Boston.
Richard Kimball and Ursula Scott married in 1611 in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England. The oldest eight children were born there. The family immigrated to American in April, 1634 on the ship “Elizabeth.”
Henry Kimball was baptized on August 12, 1615. Abigail Kimball Severens was born before 1616. Elizabeth Kimball was born in 1621. Richard Kimball, Jr. was born in 1623. Mary Kimball Dutch was born in 1625. Martha Kimball Fowler was born in 1629. John Kimball was born in 1631. Thomas Kimball was born in 1633.
The family first settled in Watertown, Massachusetts. “The home lot of Richard Kimball was six acres on the Cambridge line, now in the city of Cambridge, near the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street.”
Sarah Kimball Allen was born in 1635.
They moved to Ipswich in about 1637. The town gave him a house lot and forty acres beyond the North river on February 23, 1637.
Benjamin Kimball was born in 1637. Caleb Kimball was born in 1639.
In September, 1649 the Essex Court admonished "Joseph Fowler [Martha Kimball’s husband], Thomas Cooke, Thomas Scott [a cousin], and two of ye sons of Richard Kimball [John and Thomas], for goeing into ye woods, shouting and singing, taking fire and liquors with them, all being at unseasonable time in ye night, occasioning yr. wives and some other to go out to them.“
Ursula died on March 1, 1659 and Richard married Margaret Cole Dow in 1661.
Richard died on June 22, 1675 in Ipswich.
found on ancestry.com

Richard Kimball comes to American in 1634
Charles Franklin Kimball
New Hampshire Resources, Attractions and Its PeopleBy Hobart Pillsbury, 1927, Biographical Volume, p 212 - 213
The Kimball family in America was largely instrumental in the achievement of what is today the most powerful nation on the face of the globe. The early American ancestors of this family were of the hardy, God-fearing pioneer type, and with the knowledge that theirs was a conquest of justice, feared neither man nor the handicaps of adverse circumstances. The surname of Kimball is of English origin, and appears in that country under the various spelling of Kymbolde, Kembold, Kembould, Kembolde, and Kemball.
The late Charles Franklin Kimball, of Salem, New Hampshire, himself a capable farmer, keen business man, devout churchman, and a power in the political affairs of his State, no doubt received, through heredity, many of those extraordinary qualities that were responsible, in a large degree, for the important part which was his in the history of Salem and the community. Charles Franklin Kimball was of the eighth generation removed from Richard Kimball, the common American ancestor of practically all of the families of the name in America.
(I) Richard Kimball, on April 10, 1634, embarked with the members of his family at Ipswich, County of Suffolk, England, in the good ship "Elizabeth," bound for the shores of America, landing in due time at Boston, Massachusetts, from which place Richard departed for Watertown, Massachusetts, then a new settlement, where he became most influential. A wheelwright by calling, he was subsequently invited to remove to Ipswich, which settlement required a master of that craft in their midst, and in the latter place was spent the latter years of his life, where, too, he was most prominent. He had a brother, Henry, who had many descendants in the State of New Hampshire. Richard married (first) Ursula Scott, who was the daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England, by whom were born all of his eleven children. He married (second) Margaret Dow, widow of Henry Dow, resident of Hampton, New Hampshire, by whom there was no issue.
Children: 1. Abigail, born in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, England; married, in England, John Severans, and with him came to America; she died at Salisbury, Massachusetts, June 17, 1658; John Severans died at the same place on April 9, 1682. John and Abigail (Kimball) Severans had twelve children: their youngest child, Elizabeth Severans, married, in 1686, Samuel Eastman of Salisbury, Massachusetts; her granddaughter, Abigail Eastman, born July 10, 1737, daughter of Thomas and Abigail (French) Eastman, married Ebenezer Webster, and was the mother of Daniel Webster, the famous statesman. 2. Henry. 3. Elizabeth 4. Richard 5. Mary, born in Rattlesden, England, in 1625; married Robert Dutch, of Gloucester and Ipswich, Massachusetts. 6. Martha, born in Rattlesden, England, in August, 1629; married Joseph Fowler, born in England in 1622, and was killed by the Indians May 19, 1676, near Deerfield, Massachusetts. 7. John, born in Rattlesden, England, in 1631, and died on May 6, 1698. 8. Thomas, born in 1633, and died on May 5, 1676. 9. Sarah, born at Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1635, died on June 12, 1690; married, on November 24, 1658, Edward Allen, of Ipswich, Massachusetts. 10. Benjamin, of whom further. 11. Caleb, born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1639, and died in 1682.
(II) Benjamin, tenth child and fifth son of Richard Kimball, was born in 1637, which was coincident with the time during which his father, Richard, removed from the settlement at Watertown to the village of Ipswich, Massachusetts; Benjamin died on June 11, 1695. He is believed to have resided in Exeter, New Hampshire, in the year 1659, engaged in his trade as carpenter. It is known that Benjamin became identified with Salisbury, Massachusetts, in the year 1622 or prior to same, and was residing in Rowley, Massachusetts, on May 12, 1663, at which time he purchased lands that are now within the corporate limits of the present town of Bradford. He became overseer of the community, through selection for that post at a meeting, the first of its kind, which was called to order on February 20, 1668, and is on record as having continued in that town on March 16, 1670, and on March 15, 1674. He purchased several tracts of land on November 23, 1667, one of which had formerly belonged to his brother, Thomas Kimball, who had been slain by an Indian on May 3, 1676. Benjamin was a wheelwright and farmer, and was, for his generation, exceedingly well-to-do. A cornet of house troops, he bore the rank of "Cornet" Kimball. He, with his brother, Richard, served as soldiers in 1683 and 1684, under Captain Appleton. Benjamin Kimball married, in April, 1661, at Salisbury, Mercy, daughter of Robert and Ann Hazeltine, who was born on the "sixteenth day, eighth month, 1642," and who died on January 5, 1708; she was one of the first women, among sixteen, received into the first church in Bradford, in which town the gravestones of Benjamin and Mercy (Hazeltine) Kimball may still be deciphered. Children: Anna; Mercy; Richard; Elizabeth; David; Jonathan; Robert, of whom further; Abraham; Samuel; Ebenezer; and Abigail.
found on ancestry.com

Will of Richard Kemball 1674/75
1675 , Ipswich, Essex, Massachuesetts Colony
Richard Kimball, sr., of Ipswich made his will on March 5, 1674/5, and it was proved September 28, 1675.
He directed that his wife should live in his house, have the improvement of the land belonging thereto and the increase in the stock for a year after his decease. At the end of the year the £40 due her and the goods she brought to their marriage were to be paid to her. After that she was to have the parlor end of the house to live in, a part of the cellar, one cow, firewood and a quarter of the fruit of the orchard, but if she desired to move to her own house she was “to be sett in itt” by the executors and allowed 40 s. a year for life.
The his eldest son Henry, £90.
To his son Richard, £40. To his son John £20..
to his son Thomas, £25, and to his children £7 divided equally among them as they came of age.
To his son Benjamin beside two oxen already given him, £25, and to his children £6 to be divided equally among them as they married or came of age.
To his son Caleb, land known as Ting’s lot, land at Wattle’s neck, marsh known as Wiat’s marsh and working tools except two axes. To Caleb’s children, £14 to be divided equally as they married or came of age. To his son-in-law John Severance, £10. To his daughter Mary £10. To his daughter Sarah, £40, and to her children £7:10:0 as they married or came of age. Also to Sarah, the bed he lay on with its furnishings. To his wife’s children Thomas and Mary, 40s. each, and to Jeremiah, £15.
To the two eldest daughters of Giles Cowes that he had by his first wife (the testator’s great-granddaughters) £8 to be equally divided when they reached sixteen.
To his cousin Haniell Bosworth, £4. Executors: his sons Richard and John Kimball.
Overseer: cousin Haniell Bosworth.
Witnesses: Moses Pengry, sr., Aaron Pengry, sr.
The homestead was worth £200 and there was a good stock of animals, utensils, furnishings and linen, the total value being £737.
found on ancestry.com

Granted a Lot (Feb 1637)
23 Feb 1637 , Ipswich, Massachusetts
The town granted him a house lot, 23 Feb 1637, "next adjoining Goodwin Simons at the west end of the town."
He was also granted at the same time "40 acres Beyond the North River near the land of Robert Scott."
found on ancestry.com

To AMERICA
Richard - arrived in America aboard the Elizabeth which had embarked from Ipswich, Suffolk England on 10 Apr 1634, William Andrews, master. Included on the passenger list were Richard, age 39, wife Ursula and children Henry age 15, Elizabeth age 13, Richard age 11, Mary age 9, Martha age 5, John age 3 and Thomas age 1. The family apparently came with Richard's brother Henry Kimball and Ursula's mother (Martha) and brother's family (Thomas and Elizabeth, both age 40). Worked as a mechanic and wheelwright in Suffolk. They settled in Watertown MA before moving to Ipswich, MA about 1637. Richard was listed as a freeman in Watertown in 1635. He was a selectman for Ipswich in 1645 and the surveyor of fences in 1653. He later moved back to Watertown. from Reflections from a Busy Life by Ivory G. Kimball I am a descendant of Richard Kimball, who with his brother Henry sailed from Ipswich, Suffolk County, England, April 10th, 1634, on the ship Elizabeth, William Andrews, Master, and settled in Watertown, Mass. Richard, being a wheelwright, removed to Ispwich, Mass. in 1837, at the request of the inhabitants of that town. All the Kimballs in the United States are believed to be descendants of these two brothers. Richard Kimball became one of the prominent citizens of Ipswich, being frequently mentioned in its records and dying there in 1675.
found on ancestry.com

Wheelwright
Richard Kimball, decided to leave England on account of the religious upheaval which was then at its height in the mother country, sought a home in New England, was among the passengers on the ship "Elizabeth," which sailed from Ipswich, England, for Boston, April 10, 1634. He, at the age of 39 was accompanied by his large family, and as he was a wheelwright by trade and a skillful mechanic, he proved a most welcome addition to the infant colony. A wheelwright is a person who builds and repairs wheels. Historically, these tradesmen made wheels for carts and wagons by first constructing the hub, the spokes and the rim/fellows segments, and assembling them all into a unit working from the center of the wheel outwards. Most wheels were made from wood. He was proclaimed freeman on 6 May 1635, and was a proprietor in 1636-7. Soon after this date he was invited to remove to Ipswich, where they were in need of a competent man to act as wheelwright to the new settlement. Here he spent the remainder of his days. On 23 Feb 1637 the town granted him a house lot, and granted him "40 acres. In 1639 he had liberty to pasture "two cows free His services as wheelwright were appreciated by his townspeople, for he was permitted "to fell such White Oaks as he hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use."
found on ancestry.com

kimball in ipswitch/plum island
Richard Kimball(1-1)
Richard came to this country in the ship Elizabeth, William Andrews, master, in 1634. He appears to have gone, soon after landing, to Watertown, Mass. He settled in a different part of the town from that occupied by Henry Kemball (1). According to Bond and other writers Richard and Henry were brothers. There is but little evidence to support this supposition, and it seems to be mainly founded on the fact that they both came over on the same vessel. Richard is said on the shipping list to be thirty-nine years old, but he was probably somewhat older. He was, however, in the prime of life, and soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement.
He first settled in Watertown, and his home lot is thus given by Dr. Henry Bond: "Richard Kimball, six acres, bounded on the north by Cambridge, east by the land of W. Hamlet, south by the highway, and west by land of Edward White."
This lot was situated a long way from the centre of the town. It is now in Cambridge, which many years ago annexed the eastern part of Watertown. The lot was situated near what is now the corner of Huron avenue and Appleton street, and near springs of water.
He was proclaimed freeman on 6 May 1635, and was a proprietor in 1636-7. Soon after this date he was invited to remove to Ipswich, where they were in need of a competent man to act as wheelwright to the new settlement. Here he spent the remainder of his days. The town granted him a house lot, 23 Feb 1637, "next adjoining Goodwin Simons at the west end of the town." He was also granted at the same time "40 acres Beyond the North Riuer near the land of Robert Scott." In 1639 he had liberty to pasture "two cows free." On "the last day of the last month 1641" he is mentioned as "Among the Commoners of Ipswich." He was appointed one of the seven men on 1 Mar 1645. On the "22nd day of the tenth mo. 1647" he was allowed two Pounds for killing two foxes.
His services as wheelwright were appreciated by his townspeople, for he was permitted in January, 1649, "to fell such White Oaks as he hath occasion to use about his trade for the town use."
19 Dec 1648, he contributed with others three shillings as his annual proportion toward the sum of £27, 7s, as a rate for the service of their military leader, Major David Dennison, then commander of the military forces of Essex and Norfolk counties.
In September, 1652, he was one of the appraisers of the estate of John Cross, one of the earliest settlers of Ipswich.
On the "25th day, 11 mo 1652," he and his son Richard, Wheelwrights, "for £14, seel 30 acres upland bounding on the land of Mr. John Winthrop," also another lot of land of ten acres of "medow." 1653 he was one of a committee of three to survey fences in the common fields north of the river. His brother-in-law, Thomas Scott, died Feb. 1653-4 and he was joint executor with Edmund Bridges of his will. On May 25, 1654, their official position was recognized by Thomas Scott, Jr., then a resident of Stamford, Conn.
In 1660 he was granted the right "to fell 20 white oak trees to make wheels for the townsmen their use." In 1664 he owned 43 shares in "Plumb Island."
Ri chard Kimball was of the parish of Rattlesden, county of Suffolk, England, as is shown by the following entry on the parish register: " Henry Kemball ye sonne of Richard and Vrsula his wife baptized 1615 12 of August."
Ursula Scott, Richard's first wife, and mother of all his children, was the daughter of Henry Scott of Rattlesden. The Scott family had been in Suffolk county almost as long as the Kemball family. George Scott, grandfather of Henry, was buried at Bradsfield, St. George, 30 Aug 1562. Ursula was baptised at Rattlesden 14 Feb 1596-7, and married Richard Kemball in 1613. The will of Henry Scott, Ursula's father, serves to establish the relationship between the families.
"To Abigale Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Henrie Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Elizabeth Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21 to Richard Kemball my grandchild twenty shillings to be paid at 21." He also mentions his wife Martha, and sons Roger and Thomas Scott. Thomas Scott came with his wife, Elizabeth (Strutt) Scott and children to this country on the same vessel as Richard and his family, and they brought Martha (Whatlock) Scott with them. Elizabeth Strutt was also of Rattlesden; her parents were probably Christopher and Anne (Waller) Strutt. She married Thomas Scott at Rattlesden, 20 Jul 1620. Among the children of Thomas Scott was Elizabeth, bapt. 18 Nov 1623, in Suffolk, and given in the shipping list as 9 years of age. This Elizabeth Scott married in Rowley, MA in 1647, John Spofford, from an ancient Yorkshire family (pre-dating 106, according to the records). John Spofford was the son of another John Spofford, who, in 1662, lost his ministery in Silkston, Yorkshire for "non-conformity." He was, of course, a Puritan. A daughter of John and Elizabeth (Scott) Spofford, Sarah Spofford, born 22 Mar 1661-2, married Richard Kimball(3). The passengers on the Elizabeth were very much an inter-related group; it also included Munnings, undoubtedly related to Richard Kimball.
Henry Scott's will was made "24 Sept. 1625 in the 21st year of James of England by Henry Scott of Rattlesden in the Co. of Suffolk and the diocese of Norwich." It was proved in the court of the Arch deacon of Sudbury 10 January 1624-5. As Thomas Scott settled in Ipswich this may have had some influence in causing Richard's removal from Watertown. Henry Scott was buried in Rattlesden 24 Dec. 1624. (Parish Register.)
Ursula (Scott) Kimball apparently died in Ipswich 1 Mar 1660, although another record gives her death as 17 June 1656. Richard Kimball married second, 23 Oct 1661, Margaret (Cole) Dow, widow of Henry Dow of Hamptom, New Hampshire. There were no children from this marriage, although, from his will, Richard evidently held Margaret Dow's children from her first marriage in great affection. (NEW&GR), (Hotten), (Spofford)
found on ancestry.com

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