Tuesday, July 5, 2011

EDWARD JACKSON 1604-1681

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of James Snow, son of Mary Trowbridge (Snow), daughter of James Trowbridge, son of Sarah Ward (Trowbridge), daughter of John Ward, son of Hannah Jackson (Ward), daughter of Edward Jackson.]

Here lyes the body of Edward Jackson Aged 79 years and 5 mon Dec'd June the 17 1681

Old East Parish Burying Ground, Newton, Massachusetts








Jackson Family Farm, Westminster Massachusetts


East Parish Burying Ground, Centre St, Newton, Massachusetts
AKA Centre St Burying Ground or Centre St Cemetery.
Located at the corner of Centre and Cotton Streets, Newton Corner, Middlesex, Massachusetts.
 Behind Loring park which is now on the corner.


Current Jackson Homestead and; Museum, Newton, Massachusetts
Washington Street, Newton Corner, Massachusetts

The black borders on the chimneys indicated that the house was a part of the Underground Railroad, during and after the Civil War. It hid slaves escaping to Canada from the south.

Mansion built in 1809 by Major Timothy Jackson (1756-1814). Today known as The Jackson Homestead, it was donated to the City of Newton December 1949 by descendant Frances Hatch Middendorf and became a museum, accredited by the American Association of Museums in 1992, and celebrated its fifith anniversary in 2000. The black borders on the chimneys were a sign that it was a stop of the Underground Railroad before the Civil War. The Jacksons were abolitionists and they helped runaway slaves reach Canada.
found on ancestry.com

Saltbox House Style
This is an example of the type of house that Edward Jackson built in about 1670 and enlarged before 1690, which increased its length to 39 feet. It was originally 18 feet by 22 feet, with 2 stories. It survived for about 140 years, standing on the same spot now occupied by the mansion of William Jackson, Esq. William demolished the original house in 1809 and used some of the materials for the new mansion.


EParishBG-monument

Samuel Hyde and Edward Jackson names...
1 September 2008, East Parish Burying Ground, Newton, Massachusetts
on Newton founders monument.


Edward Jackson - ship commanded by Captain Parker Settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Assisted Rev. Elliot, with the Indians, Repr. to General Court for 17 years. Selectman, Justice of the Peace, Road Commissioner.
found on ancestry.com

Edward Jackson
Edward Jackson, Cambridge, a nailer from Whitechapel parish in London, where lived his father, Christophe, was baptized 1604 or 5 at Stepney; came about 1643; he was freeman 1645, purchased 1646 the beautiful farm of 500 acres from Governor Bradstreet for 140 pounds, which had been sold to him for 6 cows by Thomas Mayhew in 1638, before he went to the vineyard; represent. 1647 and 15 years more. Several times honored with notice as the aid of Apostle Eliot in the evangeliz. of the Indians; died 1681; by first wife, brought probably from England, named Frances, he had had, says the family tradition, four sons and four daughters, though only six are recorded; others may have been born afterward, however. Israel 1631, died in infancy; Margaret, 1633; Hannah, 1634; Rebecca, 1636; Caleb, 1638; and Joseph 1639. In favor of the tradition one may add Johnathan, Sebas, who was born on passage from Eng., and Frances, who died 1648; but that this is the wife is more probable, though the historian of Newton counters her the child; his second wife, married 1659, was Eliz., daughter of John Newgate of Boston, widow of John Oliver, the scholar (who died 17009); by her head had Sara, 1650; Edward, 1652; Lydia, 1656; Eliz. 1658; another Hannah about 1660; and Ruth, 1664 who died 1692 unmarried.
found on ancestry.com

history
Edward came to New England about 1643, and settled at Cambridge. He was freeman 1645, purchased in 1646 a farm of 500 acres from Govenor Bradstreet for �140, before he went to the Vineyard. He was representative 1647 and for 15 years more. In his will he made large gift of land in Billerica to Harvard College. He lived in what was called the village, now Newton.2
found on ancestry.com

Brief History Edward Jackson
Added by MICHOLZ on 11 April 2008
Originally submitted by carrpool1 to Carr Trettis Family Tree on 3 August2007 Edward Jackson, Cambridge, a nailer from Whitechapel parish in London, where lived his father, Christophe, was baptized 1604 or 5 at Stepney; came about 1643; he was freeman 1645, purchased 1646 the beautiful farm of 500 acres from Governor Bradstreet for 140 pounds, which had been sold to him for 6 cows by Thomas Mayhew in 1638, before he went to the vineyard; represent. 1647 and 15 years more. Several times honored with notice as the aid of Apostle Eliot in the evangeliz. of the Indians; died 1681; by first wife, brought probably from England, named Frances, he had had, says the family tradition, four sons and four daughters, though only six are recorded; others may have been born afterward, however. Israel 1631, died in infancy; Margaret, 1633; Hannah, 1634; Rebecca, 1636; Caleb, 1638; and Joseph 1639. In favor of the tradition one may add Johnathan, Sebas, who was born on passage from England, and Frances, who died 1648; but that this is the wife is more probable, though the historian of Newton counters her the child; his second wife, married 1659, was Eliz., daughter of John Newgate of Boston, widow of John Oliver, the scholar (who died 17009); by her head had Sara, 1650; Edward, 1652; Lydia, 1656; Eliz. 1658; another Hannah about 1660; and Ruth, 1664 who died 1692 unmarried.
found on ancestry.com

nail maker
Edward (1602-81) came from White Chapel, London, England, to Newton, Massachusetts, about 1642. Took the freeman's oath in May, 1645. Edward's trade was a nail maker. He purchased a farm of Governor Bradstreet in 1646 of 500 acres for ?140, which farm Governor B. bought of Thomas Mayhew of Watertown in 1638, the consideration of which was six cows (see Suffolk deeds vol. 1), it being the same farm, in part, recently held by Jonathan Hunnewell, and the same in part by William Jackson and several others at Newton Corners. He is said to be one of the first men of the Colony. He was chosen Representative from Cambridge in 1647 and was elected to that office for sixteen years, and was otherwise much engaged in public life. He was constantly present with the Reverend John Eliot at his lectures to the Indians at Nonantum, to take notes, both of the questions made by the Indians and the answers by Mr. Eliot.Edward Jackson of Cambridge was a prominent citizen and younger brother of Deacon John. Edward owned lands in both Cambridge, and Newton, Massachusetts and was Deputy to the General Court, 1647-63. He left 1,700 acres of land at his death. He willed 10 shillings to each of his grandchildren and great grandchildren to buy Bibles. Forty-four of Edward Jackson's descendants were in the American Revolutionary War from Newton, Mass. He also willed 400 acres of land to Harvard College and 30 1/2 acres for the use of the ministry in Newton. His children were all born in England except Sebastian. His first wife was Frances, he married 2d, 1649, Elizabeth, daughter John Newgate, and widow of John Oliver.

Children by Frances, born in London, England-
1. Isreal baptized 9 March 1631 died young.
2. Margaret baptized 1 January 1633.
3. Hannah baptized 1 May 1634 Whitechapel, London; married John Ward of Newton, Massachusetts 13 Ch.
4. Rebecca baptized 12 October 1636 Whitechapel, London; married Thomas Prentice.
5. Caleb baptized 10 October 1638.
6. Joseph baptized 13 September 1639.
7. Frances died October 5, 1648.
8. Jonathon born 1641 died 1693 Boston; merchant in Boston; member of Old South Church; July 1670 married 1st Elizabeth Baker daughter Thomas; 15 ch
9. Sebastian (Seaborn) born during voyage to America; 1643-1690; married Sarah Baker daughter Thomas of Roxbury; settled Newton, Massachusetts.

Children by Elizabeth--
10. Sarah born January 5, 1649 Cambridge, Massachusetts died 1711; married 1678 Reverend Nehemiah Hobart son of Reverend Peter Hobart.
11. Edward Jr. born 1652; married 1st Grace (???) died 1685; 2nd Abigail Wilson daughter Nathaniel.
12. Lydia 1656-1726; married 1679 Joseph Fuller son of John.
13. Elizabeth born 1658; married 1677 1st John Prentice, 2nd Jonas Bond.
14. Hannah born 1660; died 1690; married Nathaniel Wilson.
15. Ruth born 1664; died unmarried 1692.

Source: ABRIDGED COMPENDIUM, Frederick Virkus, Page 3497.Autobiography of W S Tyler, DD,LLD, Page 257.Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Vol II, Page 528.Samuel Richardson and Josiah Ellsworth, Pages 162-3, Author: Ruth Ellsworth Richardson, Call Number: CS71.R52.Lineage and Family Records of Alfred Wyman Hoar and His Wife Josephine Jackson, Pages 36-7, Call Number: CS71.H679.Jackson Family Records, Pages 25-6, Author: J. Mongomery Seaver, Call Number: CS71.J13.
found on ancestry.com

Monument to John Jackson and his Brother Edward Jackson. A monument stands in Newton, Massachusetts dedicated to the early settlers of the town. It was dedicated in 1852 and honors Deacon John Jackson and his brother, Edward Jackson. The monument is inscribed with the following words: "Dea. John Jackson gave one acre of land for this burial place and the first church which was erected upon this spot 1660. Edward Jackson gave 20 acres for the parsonage, 1660, and 3 acres for the ministerial woodlot, 1681". Source: Greenwood, Frederick. Greenwood Genealogies, 1154-1914. New York: The Lyons Genealogical Company, 1914.
found on ancestry.com

Edward Jackson: Brief History 1643-1681, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Came to Newton, Massachusetts in 1643, freeman in 1645, purchased a farm of 500 acres from Governor Bradstreet in 1646 for L 140. "A large body of lands at Shawshine (now Billerica) was granted by the General Court to the Proprietors of Cambridge. The Billerica lands were divided among the proprietors in 1652."2 Of which Edward Jackson was granted 400 acres. At his death he willed the 400 acres of land to Harvard College in Billerica. 1"Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts," by Colonial Society of Massachusetts, p. 251 2"History of Newton, Massachusetts: town and city, from its earliest...", by Samuel Francis Smith, p. 46. 3"Genealogical and family history of western New York: a record of..." Volume 2, by William Richard Cutter, p. 581.
found on ancestry.com

Edward Jackson
Edward Jackson, the son of Christopher Jackson, was baptized in 1604 at Stepney, Whitechapel, London, England. He was a nailer from Whitechapel parish in London, where his father lived. He came to America in about 1636 and settled at Newton, Massachusetts in 1643. He was made a freeman in Newton in 1645. In 1646 he purchased a beautiful farm of 500 acres from Governor Bradstreet for 140 pounds. Edward Jackson was one of the deputies to the General Court from Newton, 17 years in all, commencing in 1647. His service covered a greater number of years than was covered by any other representative of the town in his day. He was a Selectman of Newton in 1665; one of the commissioners to end small causes in Newton for several years, and filled many other offices in the town. Edward was part of a committee composed of the Governor, Deputy Governor, the Honorable Richard Bellingham, Simon Brandstreet, Captains William Hathorn, Humpfrey Atherton, and Surveyor Johnson, which was appointed to peruse the articles of confederation of the United States Colonies and the acts passed by that body, and to propose amendments of the same to the Congress of the United Colonies. He was also part of a group (including Simon Willard) that settled the boundary dispute between Subury and Watertown, Massassachusetts. He and Captain Robert Keayne surveyed the boundary of Dedham Village, and again with Simom Willard, he laid out the town of Billerica. Other duties included service on a committee appointed to 'examine into the affairs of Harvard College with the view of its proper maintenance, and to take cognizance of all and every matter and thing concerning the college, in reference to the welfare thereof of outward things." Davis. Several times he was honored for his service as the aid of Apostle Eliot in the evangelizing of the Indians. Johnson in his "Wonder Working Providence", says, "He (Edward) could not endure to see the truths of Christ trampled underfoot by the erroneous party." Edward married Frances Taft on December 2, 1629 in Stepney, London, England. They had, says the family tradition, four sons and four daughters, though only six are recorded; others may have been born afterward, however. Frances died on October 5, 1648, in Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Edward married his second wife in 1659. She was Elizabeth, daughter of John Newgate of Boston, widow of John Oliver, the minister. Elizabeth was baptized in January 1617 at St. Olive Church, Southwark County, Surrey, England. Edward and Elizabeth had 6 more children. Edward Jackson died 17 June 1681 at Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts. Elizabeth Newgate Jackson died on 30 September 1709 at Newton, Middlesex, Massachusetts. They both are buried at Center Street Cemetery. Edward Jackson's will, dated 11 June, probated 26 August bequeathed to his wife; sons Edward, Jonathan and Sebiss; daughters, Ruth J., Hannah Ward, Rebecca Prentice, Lydia Fuller, Sarah Hobart, and Hannah Wilson; grandchildren and great- grandchildren, to the number of 36; sons-in-laws John and Thomas Oliver and daughter-in-law Elizabeth Wiswall; to the College; to the use of the ministry; to friend Captain Thomas Prentice; sons-in-law Joseph Fuller, John Prentice, Nathaniel Wilson, John Ward, Nehemiah Hubart. The inventory of his estates proved him to be a man of wealth. He had 1600 acres of land. His property was prized at 2,477.19.6 pounds, including two slaves valued at 5 pounds each. It is a remarkable fact, taken in connection with his life and the character of his descendant, Francis Jackson, who was such an uncompromising abolitionist, that Edward, his ancestor, was a slaveholder...probably the first slaveholder in Newton, Massachusetts."

The children of Edward and Frances Taft Jackson were:
Israel, baptized 9 March 1631 at Whitechapel Parish, London, England.
Sebas, who was born on passage from England.
Margaret, born 1633.
Hannah, born 1634.
Rebecca, born 1636.
Caleb, born 1638.
Joseph, born 1639.
Johnathan

The children of Edward and Elizabeth Newgate Jackson were:
Sara, born 1650. Edward, born 1652.
Lydia, born 1656.
Elizabeth, born 1658.
Another Hannah, born about 1660.
Ruth, born 1664; died 1692 unmarried.

Sources: " New England Historical and General Register", Vol. 1, 1862, pg.94. "Warren, Jackson, and Allied Families" by Betsey Warren Davis (Lippencott, 1903). "Genealogical Guide to the Early Settlers of America". THE "PIONEERS OF MASSACHUSETTS"; page 254.
found on ancestry.com

Newton History
From Newton History website --
Jackson Homestead Edward Jackson (dates are listed 1602-1681) was born in the East End of London and, like his father before him, was a nail-maker. He amassed a substantial fortune so that soon after arriving in New England he was able to buy a house with several acres of land in Newton Corner. This was the first of many transactions that would, in time, make him the largest landowner in Newton. He was admitted as a Freeman in 1645, became a Cambridge Proprietor and, almost immediately, became involved in the civil and religious life of both colony and town. For nearly two decades Edward was Deputy to the General Court where he served on various committees, many of them charged with surveying and laying out new settlements. Among them was Natick, established by John Eliot for the Praying Indians. He was a Commissioner for Small Causes for Middlesex County, held a number of responsible town offices, and was frequently called upon to lay out new highways. When, by about 1654, the dozen or so families living south of the river, tired of the long journey to the Cambridge meeting house, started holding their own services, they probably met in the new mansion house Edward had built near the Brighton line. This was the beginning of the movement for the separation of Newton from Cambridge in which Edward later played a leading part. He died before the town achieved complete political independence. In addition, he found time to accompany John Eliot to Waban's wigwam at nearby Nonantum and recorded the questions of the Indians and Eliot's answers. Edward was married twice: to Frances, who apparently died shortly after they arrived, and to the widow Elizabeth Oliver who is said to have been present at every local birth for fifty years, earning herself the title of Mother of the Village. Edward gave much of his property to his children during his life time. Among these gifts, which were confirmed in his will, was one of a house and 150 acres to his son Sebas.
found on ancestry.com

2 comments:

  1. I am the 10th great grand daughter of Wolstone Childe. Would love to hear from relatives! Not sure my last note was published-I offered info from the Sawyer Tradition by Harry Sawyer 1943 if anyone needs info and my other greats were Trowbridge, Prescott, Jackson among others. Mary Martin

    ReplyDelete