Wednesday, July 6, 2011

JOHN JACKSON 1602-1675

[Ancestral Link: Marguerite Anderson (Miller), daughter of Hannah Anderson (Anderson), daughter of Mary Margaret Edmiston (Anderson), daughter of Martha Jane Snow (Edmiston), daughter of Gardner Snow, son of James Snow, son of Mary Trowbridge (Snow), daughter of James Trowbridge, son of William Trowbridge, son of Margaret Jackson (Trowbridge), daughter of John Jackson.]



St. Dunstan, Stepney

Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Monument to the First Settler's of Newton. John Jackson was the first person buried in this burial ground. His headstone no longer exists.

Inscription: THIS IS THE MONUMENT TO THE FIRST SETTLERS OF CAMBRIDGE VILLAGE, NOW KNOWN AS NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS


Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA

St. Dunstans, Stepney, London, England

Current church of the 1,000 year old parish of St. Dunstans in the London borough of Stepney...

Bio Findagrave
Birth: June 6, 1602, England
Death: January 30, 1675, Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
WIFE: Margaret Taft
CHILDREN:
Margaret Jackson;
Mary Jackson;
Edward Jackson;
Abigail Jackson;
Abraham Jackson

History of Newton Page 86
John Jackson was baptized in the parish of Stephney, London, June 6, 1602. He was the first settler of Cambridge Village who removed thither and died in the place. He brought a good estate with him from England. He took the freeman oath in 1641. He was one of the first deacons of the church, and gave an acre of land for the church and cemetery, in the centre of which the first meeting-house was erected in 1660. This acre constitutes the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. He labored long and earnestly, by petitioning the General Court and otherwise, to have Cambridge Village erected into an independent town; but he did not live to see the object accomplished. He died January 30, 1674-5, aged about 73 years. His widow, Margaret, died August 28, 1684, aged 60. His son, Edward, was slain by the Indians at Medfield,, in their attack upon and burning of that town, February 21, 1676.

His house was near the place where Mr. Smallwood's shop afterwards stood. The cellar yet remains, and the pear trees now standing there, are supposed to have been planted by him. Abraham was the only one among his sons who reared a family.

From the History of Newton, Page 142, Jackson, Deacon

John (died 1675), the first settler of Cambridge Village, who remained and died in it. In 1639, he bought of Miles Ives, of Watertown, a dwelling-house and eighteen acres of land, situated on the Roxbury road, very near the line which now divides Newton from Brighton. It was he who gave an acre of land for the first meeting-house and burial place, now the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. His old mansion house, which was pulled down about 1800, stood on the spot afterwards occupied by the dwelling-house of Edwin Smallwood. The old pear trees on the estate are supposed to have been planted by his son Abraham, who added an acre to the acre given by his father for the meeting-house and burial place. He left eight hundred and sixty-three acres of land.

Deacon Jackson's Headstone no longer exists at the burying ground.

THIS IS THE MONUMENT TO THE FIRST SETTLERS OF CAMBRIDGE VILLAGE, NOW KNOWN AS NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
found on ancestry.com and findagrave.com

John Jackson
History of Newton, Page 86

John Jackson was baptized in the parish of Stephney, London, June 6, 1602. He was the first settler of Cambridge Village who removed thither and died in the place. He brought a good estate with him from England. He took the freeman oath in 1641. He was one of the first deacons of the church, and gave an acre of land for the church and cemetery, in the centre of which the first meeting-house was erected in 1660. This acre constitutes the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. He labored long and earnestly, by petitioning the General Court and otherwise, to have Cambridge Village erected into an independent town; but he did not live to see the object accomplished. He died January 30, 1674-5, aged about 73 years. His widow, Margaret, died August 28, 1684, aged 60. His son, Edward, was slain by the Indians at Medfield, in their attack upon and burning of that town, February 21, 1676. His house was near the place where Mr. Smallwood's shop afterwards stood. The cellar yet remains, and the pear trees now standing there, are supposed to have been planted by him. Abraham was the only one among his sons who reared a family.

From the History of Newton, Page 142, Jackson, Deacon

John (died. 1675), the first settler of Cambridge Village, who remained and died in it. In 1639, he bought of Miles Ives, of Watertown, a dwelling-house and eighteen acres of land, situated on the Roxbury road, very near the line which now divides Newton from Brighton. It was he who gave an acre of land for the first meeting-house and burial place, now the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. His old mansion house, which was pulled down about 1800, stood on the spot afterwards occupied by the dwelling-house of Edwin Smallwood. The old pear trees on the estate are supposed to have been planted by his son Abraham, who added an acre to the acre given by his father for the meeting-house and burial place. He left eight hundred and sixty-three acres of land.
found on ancestry.com

John Jackson
The Jackson family associated with the Homestead on Washington Street is one of several who can trace their descent back to two brothers who were among the first settlers on the south side of the Charles River in Cambridge: John, who bought his first piece of land near the Brighton line in 1639, and Edward, who followed three years later. It is with Edward's descendants through his son, Sebas, that we trace the history of the Jackson family in Newton, which was once a part of Cambridge, and the Jackson Homestead.
found on ancestry.com

Deacon John Jackson 1602-1675 May have had two prior wives that died in England. Some say he came over from England on the "Defence" in 1635, others say he immigrated on the Blessing July 13, 1635.

Several different sources suggest he was among the first to settle an area outside Cambridge, Massachusetts, then called Cambridge Village and later incorporated as Newton, Massachusetts.

John Jackson's purchase of 18 acres of land and a dwelling house in what was then Cambridge Village, now Newton, Massachusetts, was the first viable settlement of that town. He is alleged to have brought a "good estate" with him from England. He bought the property from Miles Ives of Watertown, situated on the Roxbury road, very near the line which divided Newton from Brighton in 1854. He took the Freeman's oath in 1641 and was one of the first Deacons of the church. He gave one acre of land for the church and cemetery, upon which the first meeting house was erected in 1660 and which is the oldest part of what was the Centre Cemetery in 1854. His old home was pulled down about 1800, on land occupied by Edwin Smallwood in 1854. He was a proprietor of the Cambridge lands and, in the division of 1662, he had 3 acres, in 1664 he had 30 acres. In the division of the Billerica lands in 1652 he had 50 acres. He petitioned the General Court and others to have Cambridge Village established as a separate town, but died before this was accomplished.

At his death, he owned 863 acres of land. His estate was settled by agreement among the surviving children in December 1676. He was 73 years of age at his death, based upon the baptismal record, but it's not known how old he was when baptized.

This may have been the John Jackson, "wholesale man in Burchen Lane," age 30, who immigrated on the ship "Defense" from London 6 July, 1635. This man's certification was provided from Sir George Whitmore and "minister of ye parish." (See "Register," Vol 14, pg. 319 for passenger list.)
found on ancestry.com

First Settler of Cambridge, Massachusetts.
John Jackson was baptized in the parish of Stephney, London, England, June 6, 1602, He was the first settler of Cambridge Village who removed thither and died in the place. He brought a good estate with him from England. He took the freeman oath in 1641. He was one of the first deacons of the church, and gave one acre of land for the church and cemetery, in the center of which the first meeting-house was erected in 1660. This acre constituted the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. He labored long and earnestly, by petitioning the General Court and otherwise, to have Cambridge Village erected into an independent town; but he did not live to see the object accomplished. He died January 30, 1675 aged about 73 yrs. His widow, Margaret, died August 28, 1684, aged 60 years. His son, Edward, was slain by the Indians at Medfield, in their attack upon and burning of that town, February 21, 1676. His house was near the place where Mr Smallwoods shop afterwards stood. The cellar yet remains, and the pear trees now standing there, are supposed to have been planted by him. Abraham was the only one among his sons who reared a family.

From the History of Newton, Page 142

Jackson, Deacon, John (died 1675), the first settler of Cambridge Village, who remained and died in it. In 1639, he bought of Miles Ives, of Watertown, a dwelling-house and eighteen acres of land, situated on the Roxbury road, very near the line which now divides Newton from Brighton. It was he who gave an acre of land for the first meeting-house and burial place, now the oldest part of the old cemetery on Centre Street. His old mansion house, which was pulled down about 1800, stood on the spot afterwards occupied by the dwelling-house of Edward Smallwood. The old pear trees on the estate are supposed to have been planted by his son Abraham, who added an acre to the acre given by his father for the meeting-house and burial place. He left eight hundred and sixty-three acres of land. Deacon Jackson's headstone no longer exists at the burying ground.
found on ancestry.com

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