Tuesday, June 28, 2011

ROBERT ABELL 1589-1663

[Ancestral Link: Harold William Miller, son of Edward Emerson Miller, son of Anna Hull (Miller), daughter of William Hull, son of Anna Hyde (Hull), daughter of Uriah Hyde, son of Elizabeth Leffingwell (Hyde), daughter of Sarah Abell (Leffingwell), daughter of Joshua Abell, son of Robert Abell.]


Yorkshire, England





Robert and Joanna AbellFrom : http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~edgerton/NorwichFamilies.htm

Robert Abell was born circa 1605 in Stapenhill, County Derby, England, the second son of George and Frances (Cotton) Abell. In 1630, Robert immigrated to New England, presumably with Governor John Winthrop aboard the Winthrop Fleet, which arrived at Charlestown, Massachusetts in June 1630. Robert was mentioned in his father’s will (dated September 8, 1630) as “of New England”. He settled initially in Weymouth, Norfolk Coounty, Massachusetts, where his name is found on a list of those desiring to be made Freeman dated October 19, 1630 and where he took the Oath of Freeman on May 18, 1631. Robert’s name was mentioned in subsequent land records at Weymouth dated October 26, 1642 and May 21, 1644.

Robert Abell was married circa 1638 to Joanna ----, who was born circa 1610, presumably in England. Robert and Joanna Abell had seven children: Abraham, Mary, Preserved, Caleb, Joshua, Benjamin and Experience. The burial of Robert’s eldest son, Abraham, November 15, 1639, and the birth of his eldest daughter, Mary, April 11, 1642, were both recorded in the early Weymouth town records.

Robert removed to Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts circa 1643, where he purchased the land originally allotted to Job Lane. Robert’s name is found on numerous land records and court orders in Rehoboth beginning in February 1646 and continuing until his death in 1663. He was granted permission to keep an ordinary in Rehoboth on February 1, 1654 and was at the Court of Elections at Plymouth and on the Jury of the General Court at Plymouth on June 3, 1657 and June 4, 1657, respectively.

Robert Abell died at Rehoboth, Massachusetts on June 20, 1663, his death being recorded in the early vital records of Rehoboth (see Arnold, James N.; Vital Records of Rehoboth, 1642 – 1895; Providence, Rhode Island: Narragansett Historical Publishing Company; 1897). An “Inventory of the estate of Robert Abell of Rehoboth Deceased” was taken on August 9, 1663 and administration of his estate was subsequently granted to his widow, Joanna, on February 29, 1663/4. Captain Willet was requested to administer an oath to “Widow Abell of Rehoboth” for the tenth of the inventory of the estate on October 5, 1664.

Mrs. Joanna Abell was remarried at Rehoboth on June 4, 1667 to “William Hide of New Norwich”, as recorded in the Vital Records of Rehoboth (see Arnold, James N.; Vital Records of Rehoboth, 1642 – 1895; q.v.). William Hyde was among the original founders of Norwich, Connecticut (see below) and it was presumably upon her remarriage that Joanna removed to Norwich with her four younger children, Caleb, Joshua, Benjamin and Experience – the elder two surviving children, Mary and Preserved, remaining in Rehoboth. “Goody Hide” was among those (along with her son, Preserved and son-in-law, Samuel Luther) who drew for lots in the North Purchase of Rehoboth on May 26, 1668, this being the last known reference to her in Rehoboth.

The four children of Robert Abell who removed to Norwich with their mother were each married and raised large families which are well-documented in the vital records of Norwich. Caleb (~1646 – 1731) married first Margaret Post, daughter of John and Hester (Hyde) Post of Norwich, formerly of Saybrook and second, Mary Miller, daughter of George Miller of New London; Joshua (~1649 – 1725) married first Mehitable Smith, daughter of Nehemiah and Anne (Bourne) Smith of Norwich, formerly of New Haven and second Bethiah Gager, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Gore) Gager of Norwich, formerly of New London; Benjamin (~1650 – 1699) married Hannah Baldwin, daughter of John and Hannah (Birchard) Baldwin of Guilford; and Experience (~1653 – ) married John Baldwin, son of John and Hannah (Birchard) Baldwin of Guilford.

James Savage in his Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Vol. I provides the following entry for Robert Abell:

“ABELL, ROBERT, Weymouth, came, probably in the fleet with Winthrop, desir. adm. 19 October 1630, and was made freem. 18 May foll. had Abraham, bur. 14 Nov. 1639; Mary, b. 11 Apr. 1642; rem. next yr. to Rehoboth, there d. Aug. [sic] 1663, leav. wid. and four more ch. beside Mary.”

References:

- Abell, Horace A. and Lewis P.; The Abell Family in America: Robert Abell of Rehoboth, Mass.; Rutland, Vermont: The Tuttle Publishing Company; 1940.
- Lange, Paul; The Abell Family in America – transcription @ Paul Lange’s Genealogy Homepage - Maxfield King, Marilyn; Abell Family
found on ancestry.com


Robert Abell The ImmigrantThis from the August 24th 1980 pamphlet, from the Robinson-Manning 98th Annual Family Reunion.
Robert Abell Immigrant from England with Gov. Winthrop in 1630. Presumed 32nd in descent from Charlemagne, 18th from Saire de Quincey, 16th from John de Lacie, 15th from Richard de Claire. All Magna Carta surety. Source... Browning's American Royal Decent and Magna Carta Barons.
found on ancestry.com

Grant to Robert Abell (From The Mayflower Descendant)Grant to Robert Abell
"The 28th of March 1653 it was concluded on that Robert Abell shall have three acrees of meddow on the north side of the line next the towne, in the new meddow next the line pteth the lands of the purchasers and the towne of Rehoboth this meddow was given him by Mr Pence Captaine Standishand Mr Winslow "This is the true coppy taken out of the Records of the Towne ot Rehoboth p me Richard Bullocke Clarke" (this is the way it is written in the book) link below.
http://books.google.com/books?id=S4kSUt-FlcYC&pg=PA66&dq=robert+abell+descendan ts&lr=&as_brr=3#v=onepage&q=robert%20abell%20descendants&f=false
found on ancestry.com

Winthrop Society04. Robert Abell, son of George was born in 1589 in Hemington, Leicestershire, England. He was the immigrant who came to New England with John Winthrop on the Winthrop Fleet, in June 1630 and settled at Rehobeth, Massachusetts. He took the Oath of Freeman May 18, 1631. In 1638 he married Joanna whose last name is unknown. Robert removed from Weymouth in 1643, probably following Rev. Samuel Newman, the real founder of Rehoboth. Rev. Newman was minister at Weymouth for four and a half or five years, then with a majority of his congregation, in 1642 removed to a place called by the Indians Seekonk, to which he gave the name of Rehoboth. There are several records documenting his activity in Rehoboth where he lived until he died on June 20, 1663. The Winthrop Society was created for ancestors who came over on the Winthrop Fleet. The 8 children of Robert and Joanna are: not listed on this site.
found on ancestry.com

Robert AbellFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert Abell was born in about 1605[1] in Stapenhill, Derbyshire, England and died at Rehoboth, Massachusetts on 20 June 1663.[2] He was among the early settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first person with his surname to emigrate from England to the American colonies.[3] He traveled from his home to New England in 1630 as part of the first wave of a mass exodus of Puritans called the Great Migration.[4]
This initial expedition was known as the Winthrop Fleet, which consisted of 11 ships carrying around 700 immigrants. Robert Abell was “related to the Cotton family and probably emigrated under influence of Rev. John Cotton [1585–1652] or Rev. Arthur Hildersham [1563-1632] of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, who lived a few miles from the home of Abell. Derby, the home of the Cotton family, was only five miles distant.”[5]
According to Charles Henry Pope, author of Pioneers of Massachusetts, “all who came after 1650 found Massachusetts a reality, a single state, practically, although under two fraternal governments; all who came before that date helped essentially to make it.”[6]
Robert was the second son of George Abell (1561-1630)[7] and Frances Cotton (born about 1573-died by 1646).[8] On his mother’s side, he was descended from a long line of English, Norman and French aristocrats and royalty.[9]
His maternal grandfather, “Rt. Hon. Sir George Cotton,” was “Vice-Chamberlain of the Household to the Prince of Wales, (later King Edward VI) . . . a Privy Counsellor . . . [and] Esquire of the Body to King Henry VIII.”[10] Henry knighted him before or in 1542.[11]
Robert’s father, George Abell, came from a family whose English progenitor is believed to have arrived as part of the Norman Invasion of 1066.[12] At the age of 17, George enrolled in Oxford University’s Brasenose College (8 December 1578).[13] By November of 1580, he had become a barrister and a member of the Inner Temple.[14] Before June 1630, he arranged an apprenticeship in London for his son, but Robert decided to try his luck in the New World, instead. This was a move that his father disapproved of, but, nevertheless, financed.
In his will, dated 8 September 1630, George Abell states (original spelling retained), “I bequeath unto my second sonne Robert Abell onelie a Twentie shilling peece for his childs parte in regard of ye charges I have beene at in placeing him in a good trade in London wch hee hath made noe use of and since in furnishing him for newe England where I hope he now is.”[15][ edit] New Life in America
Robert Abell’s first recorded act in America (19 October 1630) was to apply to be a freeman in the recently founded village of Weymouth.[16] On 18 May 1631, he took the freeman’s oath. “This act endowed him with full privileges and responsibilities of citizenship in the new colony, including ownership of lands, in the exercise of which he continued to acquire holdings.”[17]
Most of the early settlers of Massachusetts Bay Colony had at least two major preoccupations: (1) helping build Winthrop’s “City upon a Hill,” a model Christian society, and (2) surviving and prospering in the New World. It is not known exactly how committed Abell was to the first objective, but municipal and court records show him participating in the life of his community, slowly building up his land holdings and eventual establishing a business.
During his time as a resident of Weymouth (1630-1643), his civic duties included serving on various types of juries (grand, petit and coroner’s), and records indicate that he accumulated a small amount of land (about 7 acres).[18] Like many immigrants, Robert Abell did not stay indefinitely in the first place he landed. In 1643, when the opportunity to join a newly founded town presented itself, he followed Reverend Samuel Newman (and the majority of his congregation) to a place the local Wampanoag tribe called Seekonk (a portion of which was later renamed “Rehoboth”).[19 ] Some of Abell’s activities while living there can be found in the following extracts from the minutes of various Rehoboth town meetings and Plymouth colonial records:
18 February 1646: “At a meeting of the towne it was agreed to draw lots for the new meadow, and to be divided according to person and estate, only those that were under £150 estate to be made up 150. They were drawn as followeth: [Robert Abell was number 41 on a list of 46 people].”[20]
26 February 1651: “It was agreed that Robert Abell and Richard Bullock should burn the commons round about, from the Indian fence, all the neck, to the new meadow near, and so far about the fresh meadows as may be convenient; and they are to have 20s. for their pains.”[21]
28 March 1653: “It was concluded and agreed upon, that Robert Abell should have three acres of meadow on the north side of the line, next the town, next the line that parteth the land of the purchasers and the town of Rehoboth. This meadow was given by Mr. Prince, Captain Standish and Mr. Winslow.”[22]
1 February 1654: “Robert Abell was ordered to keep the Ordinary.”[23] An "ordinary” is variously defined as a tavern or an inn. An establishment of this type was an important social institution in a small New England community and vital to the town’s economy.
3 July 1656 (Plymouth): “Robert Abell is allowed to keep an ordinary at Rehoboth.” [Bliss, Leonard.[24]
1657: Abell’s name appears in a list of persons who “have taken oath of fidelities.”[25]
22 February 1658: “At a town meeting lawfully warned, lots were drawn for the meadows that lie on the north side of the town, in order as followeth, according to person and estate: [Abell’s name is third on the list of 49 people]”[26]
At the time of his death, Abell’s estate “amounted to £354 17s. 9d. of which ‘an house and land’ accounted for £130.”[27][ edit] Second Generation of Robert Abell’s Family
Robert Abell and his wife Joanna (d. aft. 1682) [Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 43] had eight children: Abraham (died 1639), Mary (1642-1724), Preserved (born circa 1644), Caleb (born circa 1647), Joshua (born circa 1649), Benjamin (born circa 1651), Experience (born circa 1660) and a daughter whose given name and date of birth is unknown.[28]
Circa 1662, their daughter Mary married Reverend Samuel Luther (1636-1716), son of an adventurous mariner named Captain John Luther (d.1645),[29] “a focal figure in the colonies mentioned several times in Winthrop's Journal and other colonial accounts.”[30] Robert Abell’s new son-in-law was already famous in New England for having survived a massacre and kidnapping by a small group of Lenape tribesmen when he was only nine years old (1645) and went on to become (1685) the highly respected “settled pastor” of the First Baptist Church (still extant) of Swansea, Massachusetts for 31 years.[31]
Mary’s sister Experience also married a churchman (1680), Deacon John Baldwin (1654-1705), an early settler of Lebanon, Connecticut, with whom she had five children.[32]
Robert’s son Lieutenant Preserved Abell (d. 1724) was among those soldiers listed as having not only “served under Major [William] Bradford (1624-1703)” in King Philip’s War, but also “advanced money to sustain it.” (£7, 15s, 1d.)[33]
Sergeant Caleb Abell (died 1731) moved to Norwich, Connecticut in 1668 and was a selectman in 1682, constable in 1684 and 1706, townsman in 1689 and was Sergeant of the Norwich Train Band in 1701. “In the book of Grants in Norwich, there are 38 or more items to Caleb Abell.”[34]
Joshua Abell (died 1725) “was constable in Dedham, Massachusetts and frequently chosen townsman there. He moved to Norwich, Connecticut in 1667 and became a ‘considerable landowner,’ with 44 grants listed in his name.”[35]
Benjamin Abell (died1699) also held substantial property adjacent to or near his older brothers in Norwich.[36]
All of the Abell brothers had sizable families (seven to ten children each), helping to perpetuate the family name in New England. Writing in 1940, genealogist Horace Abell claimed that “probably all the present day Abells of New England stock are descended from Robert’s three sons, Preserved, Caleb and Benjamin Abell. His forth son, Joshua, did not leave any male descendants.”[37][ edit] Genealogical Significance
Robert Abell’s lineage has long been subject to intense scrutiny by historians and genealogists. Details about his heritage and legacy have been recorded in at least a dozen books (see Bibliography for complete details), including:
The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County (1836)
Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896, (1897)
The Pioneers of Massachusetts, (1900)
The Winthrop Fleet of 1630, (1930)
The Abell family in America, (1940)
Ancestors of American Presidents, (1989)
The Great Migration Begins, (1995)
Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, (2001)
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, (2004)
Plantagenet Ancestry, (2004)
The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies, (2004)
Magna Carta Ancestry, (2005)
The litany of Abell’s direct ancestors includes Charlemagne,[38] Alfred the Great, Malcolm of Scotland, William the Conqueror, Henry II of England and Edward I of England.[39] As well as being descended from the king who signed Magna Carta, John of England (1166-1216), Abell is also descended from 12 of the 25 “surety barons” whose charge it was to enforce the terms of this seminal social contract, i.e., William d'Albini, Roger Bigod, Hugh Bigod, Henry de Bohun, Richard de Clare, Gilbert de Clare, John de Lacie, William Malet, William de Mowbray, Saire de Quincey, Robert de Roos and Robert de Vere.[40]
Because of his thoroughly documented royal pedigree, Robert Abell is considered a “gateway ancestor” by a number of heritage organizations, including the Winthrop Society, Order of the Crown of Charlemagne of the United States of America, Order of Americans of Armorial Ancestry, and the National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons. This means that any individual who can prove that they are directly descended from Robert Abell has met one of the requirements for admittance into these organizations.
Robert Abell was a direct ancestor of Grover Cleveland (1837-1938), 22nd and 24th president of the United States.[41][ edit] Notes
^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, p. 66
^ Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896. p.789
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 11
^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
^ Banks, Charles Edward. The Winthrop Fleet of 1630. p. 57
^ Pope, Charles Henry. The Pioneers of Massachusetts, p. 4
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 41
^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, p. 66
^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700
^ Mosley, Charles, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, Vol. 1, p. 871
^ Boyer, Carl. Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 71
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p.13
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 41
^ Cooke, William Henry. Students admitted to the Inner Temple, 1571-1625, p. 35
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 42
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p.43
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, pp. 14-15
^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 43
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, pp. 38-39
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, pp. 42-43
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 43
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 45
^ The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 47
^ Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896, p. 917
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 48
^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
^ Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy, p. 30
^ Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy, p. 29
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 47
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 56
^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 117
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 50
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 52
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, pp. 54-55
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 15
^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, pp. 37-38
^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700
^ Brookfield Ancestor Project - Immigrant Ancestor Pages[1]
^ Roberts, Gary Boyd. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States Who Were Themselves Notable or Left Descendants Notable in American History, p. 312 [edit] Bibliography
Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America: Robert Abell of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, his English ancestry and his descendants, other Abell families and immigrants, Abell families in England. Rutland, VT: Tuttle Pub. Co., 1940.
Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. Vol. 1-3. Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.
Anderson, Virginia DeJohn. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK: 1991. ISBN: 052144764X
Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896. Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing, 1897.
Banks, Charles Edward. The Winthrop Fleet of 1630: An Account of the Vessels, the Voyage, the Passengers and their English Homes, from Original Authorities. 1930. ISBN: 0806300205
Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts: Comprising a History of the Present Towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, and Pawtucket, from Their Settlement to the Present Time; Together with Sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, and a Part of Swansey and Barrington, to the Time that They Were Severally Separated from the Original Town. Boston, Massachusetts: Otis, Broaders, and Co., 1836
Boyer, Carl. Medieval English ancestors of Robert Abell: Who died in Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony, 20 June 1663: with English ancestral lines of other colonial Americans. C. Boyer, 2001.
Cooke, William Henry. Students admitted to the Inner Temple, 1571-1625. London: F. Cartwright, 1868.
Finley, R. Mainwaring. A Short History of the Mainwaring Family. London: Griffith, Farran, Okeden and Welsh, 1890.
Fischer, David Hackett. Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1989. ISBN: 0195069056
Rider, Fremont. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, Connecticut, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.
Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy: a history of the descendants of Captain John Luther who arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630-1635. Lakeland, FL: G.A. Luther, 2001.
Mosley, Charles, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 107th Edition, 3 Volumes. Wilmington, DE: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003.
Pope, Charles Henry. The Pioneers of Massachusetts: A Descriptive List, Drawn from Records of the Colonies, Towns, and Churches, and Other Contemporaneous Documents. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1998. Originally published in 1900. ISBN: 0806307749
Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 2005. ISBN: 0806317590
Richardson, Douglas, Kimball G. Everingham, and David Faris. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 2004. ISBN: 0806317507
Roberts, Gary Boyd. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States Who Were Themselves Notable or Left Descendants Notable in American History. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. ISBN: 0806317450
Roberts, Gary Boyd, Julie Helen Otto, and New England Historic Genealogical Society. Ancestors of American Presidents. 3rd Edition. Boston, Massachusetts: C. Boyer, 1989. ISBN: 0936124148
Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England: Showing Three Generations of Those who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. Vol. 1-4. Boston, Massachusetts: Little, Brown and Co., 1862.
Thompson, Neil D. "Abell-Cotton-Mainwaring: Maternal Ancestry of Robert Abell of Weymouth and Rehoboth, Massachusetts," The Genealogist, Vol 5, No 2 (Fall 1984): 158-71, 9 (1988): 89
Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other Historical Individuals. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. ISBN: 0806313676
Winthrop, John. Winthrop's Journal, "History of New England" 1630-1649. Vol. 1 and 2. New York, NY: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1908. [edit] External links
Great Migration Study Project [2]
Luther Family Association [3]
Winthrop Society [4]
Order of the Crown of Charlemagne in the United States of America [5]
The National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons [6]
found on ancestry.com

Gateway AncestorThe litany of Abell’s direct ancestors includes Charlemagne,[38] Alfred the Great, Malcolm of Scotland, William the Conqueror, Henry II of England and Edward I of England.[39] As well as being descended from the king who signed Magna Carta, John of England (1166-1216), Abell is also descended from 12 of the 25 “surety barons” whose charge it was to enforce the terms of this seminal social contract, i.e., William d'Albini, Roger Bigod, Hugh Bigod, Henry de Bohun, Richard de Clare, Gilbert de Clare, John de Lacie, William Malet, William de Mowbray, Saire de Quincey, Robert de Roos and Robert de Vere.[40]
Because of his thoroughly documented royal pedigree, Robert Abell is considered a “gateway ancestor” by a number of heritage organizations, including the Winthrop Society, Order of the Crown of Charlemagne of the United States of America, Order of Americans of Armorial Ancestry, and the National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons. This means that any individual who can prove that they are directly descended from Robert Abell has met one of the requirements for admittance into these organizations.
found on ancestry.com


robert abell geneology family namesthese are all links to storys about the abell family from lockington yorkshire and leicestershire and joanne hyde and the hyde family

http://todmar.net
http://www.renderplus.com/hartgen/htm/abell.htm
http://www.freepages.family.rootsweb.an cestry.com/~bridges2/surmames.html
http://wwwlangeonline.com
http://home.earthlink.net/~ herblst
found on ancestry.com

bio infohttp://www.aritek.com/hartgen/htm/abell.htm#name609 Robert - occupation: tavern keeper - was the immigrant who came to New England with John Winthrop on the Winthrop Fleet, in June 1630 and settled at Rehobeth, Massachusetts. He took the Oath of Freeman May 18, 1631. The first record of Robert in America is at Weymouth, Massachusetts where his name appeared on a list of persons who desired to be made freemen on October 19, 1630. On May 18, 1631 he took the Oath of Freeman. His name appears in court records of the Quarterly Court, held at Boston, in 1638 and 1640. In Weymouth his name appears in land transactions between October of 1642 and May of 1644.
found on ancestry.com

genealogy
http://todmar.net/ancestry/abell_main.htm#Robert
The earliest recorded appearance of the family name so far discovered is on the roll of knights and men-at-arms under William the Conqueror in 1066, preserved in Battle Abbey, England, where it is inscribed in the form of ABELL. King William, after he had gained possession of the lands in England by conquest, and in order better to protect his followers in their acquired rights to the soil, sent commissioners into each county for the purpose of accumulating exact statements of the property and revenue of the kingdom wherever rents and services were due to the crown. These inquisitions or surveys were completed in the year 1086, and afterwards arranged in proper order in a record called Domesday. Through the means of this record we learn that estates or manors were managed for the crown by stewards or lords as sub-tenants. Many Normans who had rendered assistance to the Conqueror were rewarded by being made tenants-in-chief to the king. Of these tenants-in-chief there were about fourteen hundred in number. They were considered the most distinguished men of that period, and stood ready at a moment's notice to render any service that the king might require of them, whether of a civil or military nature. We find the name of ABELL inscribed in this Domesday book as an under-tenant living in the county of Kent. This may have been the progenitor of the English families that flourished in various parts of England from the conquest to the Stuart period and to the present time." Source: "Abell Family In America"

GENERATION 1
01. Robert Abell, the first Abell mentioned in the book "Abell Family in America" and "Burke's American Families" was born in 1500 in Stapenhill, Derby, England. He was named circa 1533-8 as of Stapenhill, in a complaint of Walter Blount (Chancery Proc. Early 725/38, 738/10). He is mentioned in a deed 1547, and in the will of his son George 1596. A Robert Abell, gent., was a servant or tenant to Sir Wm. Gryseley and was at Bryslincote, county Derby, in 9 Henry VIII (1517-8) (Star Cham. Proc. 19/159). He is shown to have married Helene in 1521 in Derby.

GENERATION 2
02. Robert Abell, son of Robert was born in 1531 in Derby. His spouse was unknown. Robert is mentioned in the wills of Brother Anthony in 1559, and of his brother George 1596 as then deceased. He died on May 17, 1588 in Derby.

GENERATION 3
03. George Abell, son of Robert was born in 1561 in Derby. He was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford and admitted to the Inner Temple in 1581. He was Executor to his father's Will in 1588. He married Frances Cotton, daughter of Richard Cotton, of Combermere and Mary Mainwaring. It is through Frances that this family connects to royalty through the Mainwaring line.
The 4 children of Frances and George are:
1George Abell (Born about 1587)
2Robert Abell (See Below)
3Richard Abell (Born about 1591)
4Mary Abell (Born about 1593)

GENERATION 4
04. Robert Abell, son of George was born in 1589 in Hemington, Leicestershire, England. He was the immigrant who came to New England with John Winthrop on the Winthrop Fleet, in June 1630 and settled at Rehobeth, Massachusetts. He took the Oath of Freeman May 18, 1631. In 1638 he married Joanna whose last name is unknown. Robert removed from Weymouth in 1643, probably following Rev. Samuel Newman, the real founder of Rehoboth. Rev. Newman was minister at Weymouth for four and a half or five years, then with a majority of his congregation, in 1642 removed to a place called by the Indians Seekonk, to which he gave the name of Rehoboth. There are several records documenting his activity in Rehoboth where he lived until he died on June 20, 1663. The Winthrop Society was created for ancestors who came over on the Winthrop Fleet.
The 8 children of Robert and Joanna are:
1Abraham Abell (Born on November 14, 1639 in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts - Died November 14, 1639)
2Mary Abell (Born on April 11, 1642 in Weymouth, Massachusetts) Married Rev. Samuel Luther
3Preserved Abell (Born in 1644 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts - Died August 18, 1724 in Rehoboth) Married Martha Redway
4Caleb Abell (See Below)
5Joshua Abell (Born in 1649 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts - Died March 1, 1725 in Norwich, Connecticut) Married Mehill Smith
6Benjamin Abell (Born about 1651 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts - Died June 6, 1699 in Norwich, Connecticut) Married Hannah Baldwin in 1678 in Topswich, Connecticut
7Experience Abell (Born in 1653 in Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts - Died in January 1706) Married John Baldwin
8James Abell (Born about 1755 in Weymouth, Massachusetts) Married Sarah Bowen on December 27, 1656

GENERATION 5
05. Caleb Abell, son of Robert was born in 1646 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. In 1668 he moved to Norwich, Connecticut where he married Margaret Post on July 1669. In the original purchase of land when Norwich was settled, six acres having 16 rods front was assigned to Robert Wade, this he sold to Caleb Abell in 1677, and it was afterwards known as the Abell homestead. This property abutted on Town Street 16 rods, on the home lot of Morgan Bowers 72 rods, on the river 18 rods and on John Birchard land 74 rods. The location may be seen in a map on page 67 of "Caulkins' Norwich." On December 18, 1694 Caleb was appointed to keep his house as "an ordinari or of entertayment" for the year, or until another be chosen.
In 1697 Caleb and ten others were allowed to build a seat on the east side of the meeting house on the Leanto beams for their convenient sitting on the Lord's Days. Rev. Huntington's book of "Old Houses of the Ancient Town of Norwich" names 36 men whom he supposes to have been original proprietors; but one of these was Richard Wallis and another was Caleb Abell, who in 1660 was only 14 years of age. On May 2, 1728 Caleb deeded 12 1/4 acres of land to his daughter, Experience Hide. On January 12, 1727-8 Caleb deeded to his son Noah his home lot, dwelling house and barn, all lands adjoining his home lot and lands over the river (Yantic) his pasture land lying northerly and northeasterly of William Hide dwelling house (which house was on the other side of Town Street and a little to the east) lying in two parcels, together with land on both sides of Bradford brook on north side of road leading to Lebanon, except 1 1/2 acres on south east of brook and land near Benjamin Abell's dwelling house which he gave to his son Samuel, reserving to himself and his wife Marey the dwelling house during his life and for hers after his decease, also liberty to his daughter Hannah to dwell in said house so long as she remains unmarried and a passageway across home lot to his son Samuel to Samuel's own land.
Caleb joined the first church of Norwich before 1701. He was Sergeant of the Norwich Train Band in 1701 and Selectman in 1682, Constable in 1684 and 1706 and Townsman in 1689. In the books of Grants in Norwich, there are 38 or more items to Caleb Abell. Caleb died on August 17, 1731 in Norwich.
The 9 children of Caleb and Margaret are:

1Samuel Abell (Born October 1672 - Died November 26, 1781 in Norwich, Connecticut) Married Elizabeth.
1.Elizabeth Abell (February 11, 1697-) Married Elizabeth on November 3, 1696
2. Margaret Abell (February 27, 1700-)
3. Samuel Abell (October 9, 1702-)
4. Capt. Joshua Abell (November 23, 1706-)
5. Sarah Abell (October 13, 1711-)

2Experience Abell (Born on December 24, 1674 in Norwich, Connecticut - Died October 24, 1763 in Norwich) Married John Hyde 1. James Hyde (February 28, 1706-) Married Sarah Marshall
2. John Hyde (December 5, 1698 - October 22, 1762) Married Sarah Haskins on September 21, 1721
3. Experience Hyde (September 7, 1700-) Married Samuel Gifford
4. Margaret Hyde (August 16, 1702 - February 6, 1789) Married John Tracy III on January 21, 1723
5. Eliezar Hyde (December 12, 1704 - May 11, 1772) Married Sarah Hewitt on February 8, 1733
6. Ester Hyde (February 16, 1708-)
7. Matthew Hyde (April 28, 1711-)
8. Luce Hyde (April 16, 1713-)
9. Deborah Hyde (January 22, 1715- )

3Caleb Abell (Born on April 8, 1677 in Norwich, Connecticut - Died after 1646) Married Abigail Sluman
1. Daniel Abell (February 3, 1705-Before December 3, 1794) Married Sarah Crane on December 21, 1727
2. Caleb Abell (April 25, 1709-November 23, 1804) Married Mary Clark on February 7, 1738
3. Abigail Abell (April 11, 1711-September 15, 1784) Married Joseph Sluman on March 13, 1739
4. Mary Abell (August 4, 1714-)

4John Abell (Born on December 1678) - Married Rebecca Sluman
1. John Abell (March 10, 1703 - March 10, 1703)
2. Sarah Abell (Machr 2, 1704-)
3. Solomon Abell (January 7, 1707-) Married Mary Northum in 1747
 4. Rebecca Abell (January 18, 1710-)
5. Hannah Abell (September 26, 1716-)
6. Bethiah Abell (October 18, 1718-) Married Amos Randall on February 19, 1740
 7. David Abell (April 7, 1722-June 23, 1781) Married Alice Roberts on July 12, 1742

5Theophilus Abell (Born on November 20, 1680 in Norwich - Died August 31, 1724 in Norwich) Married Anne
1. Anne Abell (July 2, 1717-February 27, 1744) Married Hezekiah Edgerton
2. Zerviah Abell (January 29, 1722-) Married Elisha Edgerton

6Joanna Abell (See Below)

7Margaret Abell (Born in 1689 in Norwich, Connecticut - Died April 18, 1752 in New London, Connecticut) Married Richard Douglas
1. Jonathan Douglas (October 30, 1705-)
2. William Douglas (January 1, 1708-)
3. Abiah Douglas (December 11, 1710-)
4. Caleb Douglas (November 7, 1714-)
5. Margaret Douglas (September 1, 1717-)
6. Richard Douglas (May 1, 1720-)
7. Samuel Douglas (May 10, 1722-)
8. Elizabeth Douglas (May 27, 1726-)

8Abigail Abell (Born on March 16, 1689 in Norwich, Connecticut - Died June 2, 1736 in Norwich, Connecticut) Married Barnabus Lathrop on January 12, 1709.

9Hannah Abell (Born on October 12, 1692 in Norwich, Connecticut)

GENERATION 6
06. Joanna Abell, daughter of Caleb and Margaret was born in November, 1682 in Norwich, New London, Connecticut. In 1707 she married Zachariah Loomis, son of John Loomis. They had 10 children. Joanna died on November 25, 1759 of smallpox in Lebanon, Tolland, Connecticut. She is buried in the Loomis Cemetery there.
found on ancestry.com

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